how to open pdf file using itextsharp in c# : Search text in pdf image Library software component .net winforms azure mvc tm2g11-part1490

Strategy for Monitoring
The authors’ original plan relied on the identification 
of baseline maps from which change areas could be mapped 
forward in time for monitoring. At the January 14, 2004, 
meeting in Seattle, a key problem became apparent: Among 
the parks there is a sense that the mid-1990s era Pacific 
Meridian Resources (PMR) maps, which are the most detailed 
of the available maps, have inadequate detail to be useful 
to field ecologists, and that these maps should not form 
the basis of a monitoring plan. Roger Hoffman (OLYM; 
Olympic National Park) raised an idea that evolved into a 
new direction for evaluation. Rather than build a change map 
based on a particular base map, the focus should be instead a 
methodology for detecting change that is —to the maximum 
extent possible—separated from any particular baseline map. 
The goal of protocol development would shift from creation 
of new maps of landcover to development of maps strictly 
focusing on areas that have changed (see notes in app. 1 from 
the January 14, 2004, meeting). Under this “change-focused” 
strategy, the remote-sensing data would serve as a filter for the 
Parks, highlighting areas that appear to be changing and which 
can be investigated in further detail either on the ground or 
with more detailed imagery (airphotos, high resolution satellite 
data, etc.).
The change-focused approach is attractive for several 
reasons:
Errors in baseline maps are not incorporated into the 
analysis—all errors will be traceable solely to the 
change detection methodology. Although the end goal 
I. Background and Objectives    
Table 2.  North Coast and Cascades Network 
monitoring goals grouped by change interval 
needed for detection.
Type 1:  Monitor yearly
Avalanche chute clearing
Landslides
Fire
Insect/disease defoliation in forest
Windthrow
Riparian disturbance
Clearcuts
Rural development
Type 2: Monitor decadally
Alpine tree encroachment
Hardwood/conifer forest composition
Forest structure 
may be to attach the change products to a particular 
map, which will have errors, the errors will be 
separable.
By focusing on areas that have changed, field sampling 
of the landscape may be more efficient. Nevertheless, 
the need to validate areas labeled “no-change” still 
may require considerable sampling effort.
By making the change methodology as modular as 
possible, it can be “bolted on” to any map or maps 
at either the beginning or ending of a given change-
detection interval. This gives substantial flexibility 
to adapt the change products to the needs of different 
users within the parks, or as new maps become 
available.
Challenges to Utilizing a Change-Focused 
Approach
There are several challenges to the change-focused 
approach. In remote-sensing technology, the changes seen 
over time are spectral, which have no inherent meaning 
ecologically, as they represent relative quantities of reflected 
light energy. While the goal of the change-focused approach 
was eliminating dependence on any particular landcover map, 
it is not possible to understand the spectral changes without 
reference to some sort of reality or truth.
Search text in pdf image - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
select text in pdf; can't select text in pdf file
Search text in pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf make text searchable; search pdf files for text
The importance of “truth” data is illustrated in 
figure 2, which lists the conceptual steps needed to move 
from remote-sensing data to actual ecological information. 
The base layer in figure 2 represents the digital numbers 
returned from a remote device. These raw data have no 
inherent physical meaning or location information. They also 
incorporate undesirable effects of atmospheric conditions, 
sun illumination and surface orientation, that are often 
unrelated to the properties of the surface materials that are 
the ultimate target of sensing. Raw images must undergo 
several so-called preprocessing steps to move them from a 
raw to a clean format that better characterizes actual surface 
Figure 2.  A schematic view of the steps needed to convert raw remote-sensing data into information useful to 
natural-resources professionals. Raw remote-sensing data are digital numbers arriving from satellite or other 
digital-recording devices, and have no inherent physical meaning. Cleanup of these data requires information on 
engineering specifications of the instrument and on conditions of the atmosphere, sun, and surface at time of data 
collection. These clean remote-sensing data are related to surface conditions with the aid of ancillary data from 
ground measurements or from basic models. In some cases, further application of models and rules is needed to 
infer spatial pattern and underlying processes.
   Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
conditions. These clean data are still one step removed from 
the information content required in this project, because 
they characterize the surface only in terms of its reflectance 
properties. Assigning meaningful labels to those reflectance 
qualities requires that the clean data be linked through models 
or rules to observations made at the surface. The result of this 
process is a map of surface properties, such as a landcover 
characterization, that has meaning to the end user. Change 
detection and labeling involve tracking these properties over 
time, resulting in maps of landscape change. Without reference 
to maps, some other source of truth data must be used to link 
reflectance information to surface conditions.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
search pdf files for text programmatically; how to select text in pdf and copy
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
find and replace text in pdf; search pdf for text
The processing steps illustrated in figure 2 expose 
another challenge to change-detection studies in the parks 
of the NCCN. Moving from raw to clean remote-sensing 
data in a single date requires that the effects of sensor, 
atmosphere, illumination, and topography be removed 
from the signal. As noted in the October 2002 meeting that 
preceded this study (Woodward and others, 2002), the parks 
of the NCCN experience frequent cloud cover and contain 
steep terrain. Atmospheric and terrain correction were 
considered potentially very challenging steps, but necessary. 
These challenges are amplified when changes over time are 
sought. Conceptually, when images from different dates have 
different spectral values, those different spectral values could 
be the result of artifacts in either sensor or viewing condition 
(the result of technological noise that cannot be cleaned, 
or of atmospheric, illumination, or topographic effects that 
change apparent spectral properties of the surface), the 
result of changes on the ground that are spectrally real but 
that are uninteresting for the change analysis (for this study, 
phenological changes), or the result of real changes of interest 
for the analysis (fig. 3). Separating real changes from the other 
two categories can be difficult.
A third challenge arises when change detection maps 
are completed. Since the product being tested is a map 
of change, not a map of landcover, validation requires an 
Figure .  Conceptual description of the relation between apparent spectral change and real, 
meaningful change on the ground. Some spectral changes are artifacts caused by variation in 
illumination, atmospheric, sensor calibration, or geometric-registration conditions. Some spectral 
changes are real changes to the spectral condition of the cover on the ground, but which are not 
of interest in monitoring (i.e. phenological state at the date of image acquisition). Finally, some 
spectral changes are real and of interest to the parks.
I. Background and Objectives    
accurate assessment not only of current conditions, but also of 
conditions at some point in the past. Thus, field measurements 
of current conditions alone will not be sufficient, and other 
approaches must be included.
Finally, the parks require monitoring of a suite of 
landscape dynamics simultaneously (tables 1  and 2). The 
multiple goals of ecological monitoring contrast with much 
of the remote-sensing research literature in change detection, 
where typically only a single attribute is tracked (Bradley 
and Mustard, 2005; Cohen and others, 2002; Collins and 
Woodcock, 1996; Coppin and others, 2004; Gumbricht 
and others, 2002; Hayes and Sader, 2001; Michener and 
Houhoulis, 1997; Muchoney and Haack, 1994; Roy and 
others, 2002; Royle and Lathrop, 2002; Sader and others, 
2003; Trigg and Flasse, 2001; Viedma and others, 1997; and 
Wilson and Sader, 2002). In many methods documented in 
the literature, analytical tools appropriate for one type of 
monitoring goal would not be appropriate or useful for another 
monitoring goal. Additionally, future monitoring questions 
may require retrospective analysis of as-yet-unknown 
processes or attributes. Therefore, any tools developed for this 
protocol must be flexible and retain as much information as 
possible, even if beyond the currently recognized monitoring 
goals.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
search text in pdf using java; search pdf files for text
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
search a pdf file for text; find text in pdf files
Tracking Change in Physiognomic Types
At the second project meeting in May 2004, the authors 
and the parks agreed on a general strategy for implementing 
the change-focused approach. Rather than derive truth 
information from existing landcover maps or from expensive 
new photo- or field-interpretation programs, cover-type labels 
would be defined in broad physiognomic categories that could 
be interpreted directly from spectral data alone. The strategy 
was based on the tasseled-cap transformation of TM/ETM+ 
data. The tasseled- cap transformation compresses the six 
nonthermal bands of Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery into 
three spectral axes, originally named brightness, greenness, 
and wetness (Crist and Cicone, 1984). Although spectral 
interpretation of Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery can be 
achieved by trained interpreters in any spectral space, the 
tasseled-cap transformation’s use of three standardized axes 
makes it especially useful for interpretation using standard 
three-color theory. Based on the authors’ experience with 
tasseled-cap imagery from many different biomes, it appears 
possible to make general interpretations of landcover based on 
tasseled-cap spectral character alone in every system (Cohen 
and others, 1998; Cohen and Spies, 1992; Maiersperger and 
others, 2001; Oetter and others, 2000; and Parmenter and 
others, 2003). For example, conifer and broadleaf forest, soil 
and rock, water, and snow and ice display predictable spectral 
characteristics in every ecosystem examined (fig. 4). As cover-
type definitions become more finely described for a particular 
ecosystem, spectral ambiguity increases. If definitions of 
physiognomic character are kept relatively generalized, 
Figure .  Tasseled-cap spectral space, showing regions where physiognomic types 
approximately are consistent across ecosystems.
    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
however, changes likely are to be tracked with relatively high 
confidence. The theme of the change-focused approach, then, 
becomes one of tracking changes among physiognomic types 
using general knowledge of the spectral properties of those 
types. Several broad categories of change detection based on 
tasseled-cap imagery were to be evaluated in Task 2.
A second theme of testing in Task 2 involved 
preprocessing. As figure 2 shows, each successive step in 
processing is built on the layer below it. Many monitoring 
objectives require detection of changes with very small 
footprints (windthrow) or with linear features that contrast 
with their surroundings (rivers, avalanches). Therefore, 
geometric registration was presumed to be of paramount 
importance. Additionally, the change-focused approach 
requires that the spectral space of images from the two dates 
be aligned. Radiometric correction, which accounts for 
effects that cause misalignment of spectral space, including 
engineering, sun angle, and atmospheric effects, thus also was 
expected to be critically important. Radiometric correction 
also is necessary to build consistent and robust long-term 
datasets.
Therefore, the goals of Task 2 were to develop pilot 
studies to examine approaches to implement the change-
focused strategy and to investigate best practices for 
preprocessing of Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery in support of the 
parks’ monitoring goals. Additionally, because snow and ice 
questions were acknowledged to require more than Landsat 
TM/ETM+ data alone, a separate pilot study investigating the 
potential use of MODIS snow products was needed.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
select text pdf file; text select tool pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
how to select text in pdf; pdf searchable text converter
Key Findings of the Pilot Studies in Task 2
A brief overview of the findings of Task 2 is relevant. 
First, the authors determined that typical tolerances for 
geometric coregistration of images (Richards, 1993) are often 
inadequate for the monitoring goals desired by the parks. The 
authors have included specific recommendations for ordering 
and processing imagery standard operating procedures 1 
and 2 (SOP 1 and 2) that improve geometric properties of 
coregistered images. Included is a version of automatic tie-
point software that finds hundreds of image tie points quickly, 
allowing excellent coregistration of images. These approaches 
will minimize, but never entirely eliminate, artifacts of 
misregistration.
Second, detecting subtle changes caused by insect 
defoliation, encroachment of woody vegetation into 
herbaceous zones, and recovery or transition in forest 
type requires that radiometric and atmospheric differences 
between images be removed. The authors found that excellent 
radiometric normalization of images can be achieved with 
the MADCAL algorithm (Canty and others, 2004), an 
implementation of which is included with this protocol 
(SOP 2).
Third, spectral separation of forest age and structure 
information requires large sets of photo-interpreted reference 
data, which was determined by the parks to be beyond the 
scope of the work desired under this protocol. Therefore, 
changes in forest structure would not be modeled explicitly 
in terms of objective age or structure attributes. Rather, they 
would need to be wrapped into general change-detection 
procedures and separated in a relative sense.
Fourth, the authors found that standard change detection 
approaches in the literature must be adapted to handle the 
diversity of changes being sought. The change-detection 
method most attractive to the parks at the February 2005 
meeting was a directed change-vector approach, which 
allowed more intuitive labeling of change than the standard 
change-vector approaches in the literature (Lambin and 
Strahler, 1994 and Malila, 1980). The method ultimately was 
considered inadequate because of the lack of connection to 
real quantities on the ground. Therefore, it was used as the 
model for development of a final method for change detection 
based on fuzzy classification approaches (see “Methods” 
section below, as well as details in SOP 3).
Fifth, validation methods must be based on direct 
interpretation of satellite imagery because airphotos will not 
be available for yearly assessments, and because exhaustive 
field validation is too costly for the future budgets of the parks. 
Therefore, the authors have described an approach to validate 
directly from satellite imagery (SOP 4) that allows followup 
with airphoto or field validation.
Finally, monitoring goals for rural development and 
snow and ice extent were determined infeasible with Landsat 
technology alone. Rural development, especially near the 
smaller parks of the NCCN, likely is better achieved through 
more focused investigations that revolve around tax-lot 
information and monitoring of specific locales of interest 
to the parks. The authors showed that raw MODIS data 
may be useful for tracking regionwide temporal and spatial 
patterns of snow extent, but that the MODIS snow product 
itself was not suitable for the parks’ needs. In a pilot study 
for a year of MODIS imagery (water year 2002/MODIS 
data version 4, obtained from EDC in November 2004), the 
8-day maximum snow extent product contained significant 
false positives and false negatives distributed across the 
landscape, and these patterns of error changed for each 
8-day period visually examined, indicating that there was 
no predictable bias that could be corrected. Examination of 
individual day data indicated that cloud cover may have been 
a significant complicating factor. A detailed snow-extent 
mask was extracted for two single dates that coincided with 
Landsat 7 imagery (one in 2001 and one 2002). Relative 
to the fine-grained Landsat data, the MODIS snow product 
underestimated snow extent significantly. However, a simple 
unsupervised classification of the raw MODIS imagery from 
those same dates suggested that the snow signal was present 
in the spectral information of the MODIS imagery, indicating 
that its use may be appropriate if specialized products can 
be developed for the NCCN. Further development of snow-
monitoring goals with MODIS will need to be addressed 
separately.
II. Sampling Design
Because the maps of change are produced for every pixel 
in a park, the sample used for the final product is spatially 
exhaustive. Temporal sampling of imagery depends on the 
type of monitoring goal being tracked: Type 1 monitoring 
goals require yearly sampling of imagery, while Type 2 
monitoring goals require decadal sampling.
Various parts of the processing methodology (see 
Methods below) require that sample sites be used for training 
and validation. For example, the radiometric-normalization 
approach requires identification of many thousands of pixels 
that have not changed over time and the validation approaches 
require sampling of the landscape for intensive satellite-to-
satellite (S2S) validation or field sampling. These sampling 
issues are confined to the discussions within each SOP.
II. Sampling Design    
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR component. Professional PDF to text converting library
select text in pdf reader; how to make a pdf file text searchable
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
The following demo code will show how to replace text in specified PDF page. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Set the search options.
pdf make text searchable; converting pdf to searchable text format
III. Methods
Overview of Methodology
At the end of the February 2005 meeting, the parks and 
the authors agreed upon a general structure for Landsat-based 
monitoring of landscape dynamics. The structure was an 
amalgam of approaches tested in Task 2, with several new 
components determined at the end of the February meeting. 
The basic purpose for the change-focused approach would 
remain as it had throughout much of the project: create maps 
of change in cover type that could be used as an alarm to 
indicate where more focused monitoring should occur. Of the 
methods tested in Task 2, the directed change-vector approach 
was attractive to the parks because it captured the complexity 
of change on the landscape in a manner that was relatively 
intuitive to understand. The primary drawback was that the 
relative changes captured by this approach had no inherent 
meaning, either in terms of physical quantities or class-based 
membership. For many management needs, resource managers 
would need summarized versions of these changes that sorted 
the information according to change type and labeled it 
according to certainty thresholds. Traditional classification-
based change methods were attractive in their ability to 
describe spectral space in terms of membership in classes with 
physical or ecological meaning. However, these approaches 
did not capture the complexity of change adequately, and were 
too constrained to allow later reinterpretation if monitoring 
needs were to change. Therefore, the desired approach was 
one that would retain the key characteristics of the directed 
change-vector approach while allowing more explicit 
characterization of the physical characteristics of the changes 
being captured.
Core Approach
After the February 2005 meeting, the authors developed 
an approach to meet those needs. Geometric and radiometric 
preprocessing steps are defined according to those found most 
useful in Task 2. Images on either end of the change interval 
are normalized using the MADCAL approach of Canty and 
others (2004). For a baseline image, expert interpretation of 
k-means, nonparametric-classification procedure is used to 
partition tasseled-cap space into broad physiognomic classes. 
These classes can be mapped onto the landscape, and thus can 
be linked with any appropriate reference dataset (ground plot, 
airphoto interpretation, etc.) to describe the classes in terms 
deemed relevant to managers.
10    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
More importantly, these spectral classes also are used to 
develop multivariate-normal probability distributions for the 
baseline image. Based on the multivariate-normal distribution, 
probability of membership (POM) in all physiognomic classes 
is calculated for every pixel in the baseline image. Because 
the original k-means classification is based on image data, 
classes are distributed across the entire spectral space, such 
that few points on the landscape are far in spectral space from 
a class centroid. With robust radiometric normalization, the 
second image in the change interval can be mapped directly 
into the POM space of the baseline image. By subtracting 
POM images from the two dates, changes on the landscape are 
expressed in terms of changes in the POM classes.
The method is based on well-established classification 
approaches. The POM calculation comes directly from a 
standard maximum likelihood classification process (Richards, 
1993). In the typical incarnation, however, each pixel would 
be assigned to the class in which it had the highest POM. In 
a fuzzy-classification approach for single-date mapping, the 
POM in all classes are retained, allowing pixels to take on 
fuzzy membership in several classes (Wang, 1990; Foody, 
1996). Here, we extend the single-date, fuzzy-mapping 
paradigm into two-date change mapping. When events on the 
ground result in a spectral change, those changes are expressed 
as n-dimensional vectors of changes in class membership 
likelihood, where n is the number of physiognomic classes. 
Essentially, changes in spectral space are converted to 
changes in an n-dimensional POM space, where probability 
is expressed on a 0.0 to 1.0 basis. It is important to emphasize 
our method does not ascribe a single-class label to the class 
with the highest POM; these POM values are carried forward 
for all classes. This avoids the problem of a typical hard 
classification, where change is captured only if it happens to 
cross a discrete boundary in spectral space. Because the POM 
space is defined according to easily grasped physiognomic 
classes, this method provides a descriptor that is more intuitive 
to a nonspecialist audience than descriptors based solely on 
spectral values.
One of the attractive properties of this approach is 
its ability to produce maps of change at different levels of 
probability. By accepting only changes where probability of 
class membership changes dramatically, only high-certainty 
changes are mapped. Lowering the threshold includes changes 
that are increasingly more ambiguous. An example from Mt. 
Rainier National Park is shown in figure 5, where change 
maps at two levels of thresholding are shown (figs. 5B and 
5D). As long as the POM threshold is stated explicitly, there is 
no one correct threshold for change detection. In practice, it is 
likely that only one or two thresholds are of actual interest to 
individual parks, but until this protocol has been implemented 
over time and at different parks, the authors will not prescribe 
a particular threshold for change. Regardless of the threshold 
of change chosen, it must be validated.
Figure .  Tasseled-cap images and associated change products for an area adjacent to Mount 
Rainier National Park. (A) Tasseled-cap imagery from 1996. Aspect classes are processed 
separately; this imagery shows only northwest aspects. Tasseled-cap brightness is shown in 
red, greenness in green, and wetness in blue. Conifer forest appears as light cyan to dark blue, 
broadleaf vegetation as yellow, and open areas as red or orange. (B) The product of the fuzzy-
change-detection approach for the 1996 to 2002 period, shows only areas where probability of 
membership (POM) in a given class has changed by more than 70 percent. Red, green, and blue 
color guns correspond to bare soil, broadleaf, and conifer physiognomic types. Insect mortality 
results in negative conifer values and  broadleaf values, leaving yellow (G+R color guns positive) 
or green (only G color gun positive) tones. (C) As in part A, but for the year 2002. (D) As in part B, 
but for a change threshold of 50 percent rather than 70 percent.
III. Methods    11
Translating POM Images
Validation of the POM change image is difficult. 
Quantitative validation of a continuous-variable, 
n-dimensional product requires independent estimates of a 
similar n-dimensional space, which is largely impractical. 
Even if these spaces could be validated, the changes in 
physiognomic class membership do not correspond directly 
to the monitoring goals of the parks listed in tables 1  and 
2. Therefore, to increase utility to the parks, physiognomic 
changes expressed in the POM difference images should be 
translated into change labels that can be validated and that can 
be linked more logically to monitoring goals.
For the purposes of both validation and linkage to 
monitoring goals, differences in POM are compressed into 15 
categories of change (table 3 ) that can be interpreted directly 
from interpretation of tasseled-cap data.  Rules for linking 
changes in physiognomic class POM to S2S change classes 
(see below) are presented in SOP 3. Using these rules, an 
image of S2S change class is created from the difference in 
POM images. This categorical map of change labels greatly 
simplifies use of the change products for nonspecialists.
Additionally, the S2S categorical maps can be validated 
directly from satellite imagery. The classes in table 3  form 
the core of the S2S validation approach (described in SOP 4). 
Validation is achieved by visual interpretation of tasseled-cap 
imagery at the start and end of the change interval, as well as 
a tasseled-cap-difference image and a high-resolution digital 
orthoquad (DOQ). Rules are used to aid in interpretation and 
to score the confidence of the interpreter in change calls.
S2S change classes encompass two types of change. S2S 
classes two through seven all involve change to or from water. 
These changes are categorical: if water was present at one time 
period and not the other, the change falls into one of these 
classes. These changes refer entirely to changes in riparian 
areas, not to shoreline changes in stationary water bodies. The 
remaining classes describe changes occurring elsewhere on 
the landscape, and are considered to be relative-change types. 
Classes 10 and 13 are used if vegetation quantity is changing, 
but cannot be determined to be solely change in conifer or 
broadleaf types. As defined here, broadleaf types encompass 
not only broadleaf-forest vegetation, but all non-needleleaf 
herbaceous and woody vegetation.
12    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Table .  Satellite-to-satellite interpretation 
change classes.
Satellite-to-
satellite code
Description
1
No change
2
Water to rock/soil
3
Water to partial vegetation cover
4
Water to complete vegetation cover
5
Rock/soil to water
6
Partial vegetation to water
7
Complete vegetation to water
8
Increase in broadleaf
9
Increase in conifer
10
Increase in vegetation
11
Decrease in broadleaf
12
Decrease in conifer
13
Decrease in vegetation
14
Increase in snow
15
Decrease in snow
The S2S classes listed in table 3  represent just one 
approach to labeling change from imagery, and are described 
in more detail in SOP 4. Although suggested for use in this 
protocol, future evaluation of products may lead to addition or 
subtraction of some categories.
Most of the monitoring goals in tables 1 and 2 can be 
described according to labels used in the S2S change classes 
(table 4). As table 4  lists, the physiognomic cover-type 
changes associated with many monitoring goals are the same. 
Loss of vegetation broadly describes many disturbances, for 
example. Ascribing agents of change requires analysis of 
the spatial pattern of the change and its context, as well as 
understanding of the processes that drive landscape dynamics. 
These require contextual pattern analysis and process-based 
rule building, the algorithms for which are not included as 
part of this protocol. Rather, the goal of this protocol is to 
produce maps that highlight and label changes in terms of their 
physiognomic type. These form a strong foundation on which 
to build any number of spatial analyses.
Table .  Linking monitoring goals to satellite-to-satellite interpretation classes.
Agent
Description of change
Satellite-to-satellite  
interpretation class
Group 1:  Monitor yearly
Avalanche chute clearing
Avalanche occurs in a chute with broadleaf shrubs
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Avalanche occurs in a chute with conifer stands
Conifer, 
Vegetation
Landslides
Landslide clears broadleaf trees or shrubs
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Landslide clears conifer forest
Conifer, 
Vegetation
Fire
Fire occurs in herbaceous, shrub, or broadleaf tree community
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Fire occurs in conifer-shrub/conifer-tree community
Conifer, 
Vegetation
Insect/disease defoliation in forest Defoliation occurs in broadleaf forest
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Defoliation occurs in conifer forest
Conifer, 
Vegetation
Windthrow
Windthrow occurs in broadleaf forest
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Windthrow occurs in conifer forest
Conifer, 
Vegetation
Riparian disturbance
Shifting stream channel removes or covers sandbar/rock/gravel
Rock/soil 
Water
Shifting stream channel builds  sandbar/rock/gravel
Water 
Rock/soil
Shifting stream channel removes broadleaf trees or shrubs or 
conifer trees
Partial vegetation 
Water,
Complete vegetation 
Water
Shrub/grass cover quickly recovers on newly deposited sandbar
Water 
Partial vegetation cover
Water 
Complete vegetation cover
Shifting stream allows recovery of shrub cover on gravel bars
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Longer term recovery of conifer occurs along riparian corridor
Conifer
Clearcuts
Clearcut in broadleaf forest
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Clearcut in conifer forest
Conifer, 
Vegetation
Rural development
Conversion from agriculture to developed
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Conversion from broadleaf to developed
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Conversion from conifer to developed
Conifer, 
Vegetation
Group 2: Monitor decadally
Alpine tree encroachment
Broadleaf shrub encroachment into rocky glacial outwash
Broadleaf, 
Vegetation
Conifer shrub/tree encroachment into rocky areas
Conifer,  
Vegetation
Hardwood/conifer forest 
composition
Succession from broadleaf shrub to broadleaf tree
Broadleaf
Succession from broadleaf shrub or tree to conifer shrub/tree
Conifer
Conversion from conifer to broadleaf
Broadleaf
Forest structure 
Transition from broadleaf shrub to broadleaf tree
Broadleaf
Transition from semi-open to closed conifer canopies
Vegetation
Transition from young, dense conifer stands to vertically 
structured older stands
Conifer
III. Methods    1
Detailed Flow of Methods
In a general sense, the flow of methods of image 
processing is captured in the sequence of the first four SOPs 
provided with this document. Preprocessing is applied to 
images at the start and the end of the change interval, and 
includes geometric and radiometric processing (Canty and 
others, 2004; Kennedy and Cohen, 2003; Richards, 1993). 
The change interval is only 1 year for Type 1 monitoring goals 
and a decade or more for Type 2 goals. The change-detection 
approach described above is applied to the images to produce 
a map of changes in POM in nine physiognomic classes 
(SOP 3). Thresholds are applied to the map of change in 
probability, and change types are compressed into one of the 
15 S2S classes listed in table 3 . Validation (SOP 4) requires 
Figure 6.  Steps in the startup phase. An image from the era corresponding to the date of recent field validation (approximately 
2005) is normalized to reference images, classified, and translated into probability-of-membership (POM) images for two aspect 
classes. These baseline POM images are then used in Type 1 and Type 2 change-detection phases (
figs. 7
and 
8
).
1    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
independent interpretation of the imagery at a sample of areas 
across the park, and can be followed by airphoto-based or field 
validation.
The images involved in these steps will differ during 
three distinct phases of the project. The “startup” phase 
focuses on establishing a foundation image that can be 
linked with the field data collected by the NPS in the current 
era under a project designed to validate maps developed in 
the past by PMR (henceforth named “field-collection era.” 
around 2005). Figure 6 provides a flow diagram describing 
this process. First, a Landsat image most appropriate for 
linkage with the field data is identified, purchased (SOP 1), 
and is normalized to a reference ETM+ image acquired from 
the LEDAPs  (using methods of SOP 2; LEDAPS reference: 
http://ledaps.nascom.nasa.gov/ledaps/products2005_new.
html). The resultant image becomes the reference image 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested