how to open pdf file using itextsharp in c# : Select text in pdf file software Library dll windows asp.net web page web forms tm2g110-part1491

c. Convert the grid coverage to a polyline.
i.  In ArcToolbox, select Conversion Tools/From 
Raster/Raster to Polyline.
(1)  Input raster:  The grid just created.
(2)  Output polyline:  <park>_1500pl.
d.  Convert the polyline to a coverage.
i.  In ArcToolbox, select Conversion Tools/To 
Coverage/Feature Class to Coverage.
(1)  Input Feature Class:  The polyline dataset 
just created.
(2)  Output coverage:  <park>_1500arc
e.  Build topology for the Arc coverage.
i.  This approach uses Arc Workstation—the 
command line oriented version of Arc that 
comes with ArcGIS. If Arc Workstation was not 
installed with ArcGIS, consult documentation on 
installing it. Alternatively, users of ArcGIS may 
be aware of other means of building the topology 
for the coverage. 
ii.  Start Arc Workstation.
iii.  Change the workspace to the one where the 
coverage just created exists. 
iv.  Type:  build <park>_1500arc poly
f.  In ArcMap, load the coverage into the same map 
composition. 
i.  Confirm that the boxes fall within the study area. 
3.  Select a random subset of those grids.
a.  The process above created a polygon coverage where 
each 1.5-km box has a unique ID.  Those IDs can 
then be used to develop a random subset. 
b.  Calculate a new column for the IDs.
i.  In the build in Arc, the polygon IDs were 
assigned to an item (column header) with the 
name of the coverage and a # at the end.  We 
want to lock those numbers into the column with 
the coverage name followed by “-ID”, which will 
be stable (fig. 3).  Right now, it is set to zeros. 
ii.  In ArcMap:  With the coverage open in ArcMap, 
right-click on the name of the coverage in the list 
of layers on the left of the ArcMap interface, and 
select “Show Attributes.”
(1)  The table with the attributes for all of the 
1.5 km boxes will pop up. (fig. 3). 
iii.  Left-click on the title of the column with the 
ending “-ID”.
(1)  The column should be selected (see 
figure 3).
iv.  Right-click on the column header and choose 
“Calculate.” 
(1)  Answer “Yes” when queried about editing 
outside of the editor.
(2)  A Field Calculator window will pop up  
(fig. 4)
(3)  In the “Fields:” area, simply click on the 
field label with the # symbol at the end.
(a)  In figure 4, it is the field “MORA_
1500_PL#”.
(b)  The field should show up in the bottom 
area, indicating that the “-ID” field will 
be calculated to be equal to the “#” 
field. 
Figure :  A portion of an attribute window, showing the 
appropriate column to select.
Figure .  Field Calculator window.
SOP .  Validation of Change-Detection Products     
Select text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert pdf to word searchable text; how to select text in a pdf
Select text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
searching pdf files for text; convert pdf to searchable text
c.  Export the table
i.  Still in the Attributes window, select “Options/
Export.” (Options is a button near the bottom on 
the right.)
(1)  Select “All Records” from the pulldown at 
the top of the window.
(2)  Click on the folder icon to change the name 
and type of the output.
(a)  Change the type from .dbf to text.
(b)  Change the name and location of the 
file to one such as:  <park>_1500arc.txt
(c)  Do not add the table to the current map 
when prompted. 
(1)  Optional: In a file explorer, change the name 
of the exported file.
(a)  Although ArcMap calls this file a text 
file, and assigns the extension .txt, it 
actually is a comma-delimited file. 
(b)  Using a file explorer, change the 
filename extension from .txt to .csv
ii.  In Excel or a similar spreadsheet:
(1)  Open the text file.  
(a)  If the extension was changed to .csv, it 
can be read directly into Excel, but if 
the filename extension is not changed, 
the import dialog will guide user 
through the steps. 
(b)  Five columns will appear. 
(c)  The column with increasing sequential 
numbers is the one from which random 
samples will be chosen. 
(2)  Create a column of random numbers.
(a)  In a sixth column, type “random_
number” in the first cell.
(b)  In Excel: Type and paste to all cells the 
function RAND()
(i)  Because this number changes each 
time it is pasted, it must be captured 
once.
1.  Once all cells have had a random 
number generated, copy the entire 
column, paste special,  and select 
“Paste Values Only.” 
a.  The random numbers will 
become locked. 
(3)  Create a column with the rank of the random 
numbers.
(a)  In a seventh column, type “Rank” in the 
first cell.
(i)  Copy and paste the rank formula into 
all cells.
1.  In Excel:  Use ANK(<cell>, <all 
cells>, 1) to sort ascendingly.
a. Or use “Insert/Function,” type 
 Rank in the search window, and 
 use the help wizard to select the 
 correct cells.
b. Regardless of the method used 
 for the first cell, the address for 
 the range of cells against which 
 to rank must be locked.
i.   Put dollar signs ($) before 
the number components of the 
beginning and ending of  
the range of cells for the rank  
calculation.  
Example: change  
=RANK(F2,F2: F1786,1) to  
=RANK(F2,F$2: F$1786,1).
(4)  Determine how many validation boxes will 
be used for validation.
(a)  Because the size of the change events 
is small and unknown, and the rate of 
change is unknown, it is difficult to 
know how many validation boxes are 
necessary. 
(b)  Aim for a 5 percent sample. If there 
are 2,000 boxes in the spreadsheet, this 
would mean 100 boxes for sampling. 
(c)  All boxes with a rank from the random 
number generation less than 101 will be 
used for validation.  
(5)  Create an indicator for those boxes that will 
be used for validation.
(a)  In a new column, type “Use_it” in the 
first cell.
(b)  Insert a conditional formula into the 
next cell .
6    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
how to select text on pdf; search text in multiple pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
pdf find text; cannot select text in pdf file
i.  In Excel:  use the formula =IF(rank < 
101, 1, 0)
1.  This will set the Use_for_
validation column to 1 if the box 
is to be used for validation, and 0 
otherwise. 
2.  Copy the entire column and paste 
special, values only, to lock in the 
values. 
3.  Delete all columns except for the 
column with unique IDs and the 
column “Use_it” 
that was just created. 
(6)  At this point, the file should have two 
columns – one for the unique identifier of 
the boxes, and one with the “use label.” 
(7)  Save this file (maintain it in the .csv format).
(8)  Close the file in Excel.
(a)  This is important!  ArcMap will not 
allow joins if the file is open in the 
spreadsheet program. 
(b)  This Excel file will then be linked to the 
coverage, once the coverage has been 
imported into the geodatabase. 
4.  Import the coverage of boxes into the feature dataset 
created in section IV.c. above in the geodatabase. 
a.  Start ArcCatalog.
i. Navigate to the directory with the geodatabase 
created in section IV.c. above. 
(1)  Expand the database to see the feature 
dataset associated with this change interval 
(i.e. “mora_96_02”).  
(a)  Right-click on the feature dataset, and 
select “Import/Feature Class (single).
(b)  Navigate to the polygon coverage 
just created in steps 1–3, and select 
the polygon-feature class from that 
coverage to import.
(c)  For simplicity, name the Output Feature 
Class Name in a manner that allows 
identification of the park, the year of the 
change detection, and the fact that this 
coverage is of the validation boxes. 
b.  In ArcMap, remove the stand-alone polygon coverage 
from display by right-clicking on it in the layers 
window, and then select Delete.  This will prevent 
later confusion. 
c.  In ArcMap, bring in the newly imported feature class.
5.  Add new fields to this feature class.
a.  See section IV, step 1.e. for how to add an item to a 
feature class (table 1).
i.  Add these items and types: 
6.  Then join this feature class to the Excel file indicating 
which polygons should be used for validation.
a.  In ArcMap:
i.  Join the .csv data back to the original boxes.
ii.  Right-click on the polygon coverage of the 1.5 
km boxes, and select “Joins and relates/Join.”
(1)  The Join Data dialog will pop up (fig. 5).
iii.  Choosing answers to the three fields needed.
(1)  The field in this layer that the join will be 
based on is the one with unique IDs for each 
box. This is the column whose values were 
calculated in step 3.b. above. 
(2)  The table to join to this layer is the 
spreadsheet just created. 
(3)  The field in the table should be the same 
name as in the first field, since it was created 
from the layer    
in part 1. 
Figure .  Join data dialog window in ArcMap.
SOP .  Validation of Change-Detection Products     
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
how to select text in pdf and copy; make pdf text searchable
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Enable users abilities to adjust color and transparency while scraping text from PDF file. Able to redact selected text in PDF document.
how to select all text in pdf file; how to search a pdf document for text
b.  After this join, the column with the label “Use It” 
will contain ones and zeros.  The feature class will 
then be subset so that only the polygons with a use-it 
value of 1 remain.
i.  In ArcToolbox, select Analysis Tools/Extract/
Select.
ii.  The input feature is the feature class on which 
the join was just done.
iii.  The output feature class is the name of the 
layer that will be used to do the actual S2S 
interpretation. Name it with the park, the year of 
the change interpretation, and “S2S” to indicate 
that it is for the S2S.
iv.  Use the Expression to select only the polygons 
that have a Use It value of 1.
(1)  Click on the button with the letters 
“SQL” on it.  In the expression builder, 
select the “Use It” column by double-
clicking (to make it appear in the 
expression window in the bottom half 
of the window), then add “= 1” after it.  
Click OK. 
(2)  This will create a new layer with only 
the randomly selected polygons. 
c.  Load this layer into ArcMap to ensure that only 
a subset of polygons remains. (See fig. 6 for an 
example at MORA.)
d.  Indicate in each box the baseline condition of No 
Change (S2S type 1).
i.  Enable editing on the layer just created (Editor/
Enable Editing). 
ii.  Open the attribute editor for the layer.
(1)  Click on the first cell in the “Change_type” 
column, which currently should have the 
<Null> value. 
(a)  Type in the number 1 in this cell. 
(b)  Use the down arrow to select the next 
cell down, and type a 1. Do this for all 
of the boxes.  This sets the background 
value of 1 to be no-change for all of the 
boxes that will be interpreted. 
Method 2:  Selecting Validation Boxes Based on 
Airphoto Availability 
If airphotos are available and are to be used later to 
validate the S2S process, then S2S must be conducted at 
locations where airphotos can be used for such a validation.  
1.  Determine candidate airphoto pair.
a.  If airphotos are to be used to validate the S2S 
process, airphotos from the same areas must be 
available in both the early and late image dates.  
Because of missing airphotos, difficulty matching 
flightlines, etc., this is not possible for every single 
photo in a flightline. 
b.  Determining the appropriate set of airphotos will be 
highly dependent on the particular airphotos available 
at a given park, and thus cannot be written in specific 
detail.  Rather, we present here a sketch of the typical 
steps. 
c.  Locate the center points of all airphotos in both years 
(early year and late year). 
i.  This already has been done for most parks, as 
digitized flightlines are available for most current 
airphoto acquisitions. If not, photo-center points 
must be digitized by hand into a point coverage 
where the airphoto name and unique identifier on 
the photo itself are stored as one of the fields in 
the point-coverage database. 
d.  Methodically search through all of the airphotos in 
1 year and determine which photos in the prior year 
cover the same area. These will be candidates from 
which to draw samples for S2S validation. 
i.  The airphoto validation of the S2S process will 
be matched to the size of the S2S validation 
boxes, which are 1.5 km on a side.  This size was 
chosen to capture a large enough area on most 
1:12,000 airphotos, but not so large as to require 
sampling on the edges of individual photos, 
where distortions are greatest. 
Figure 6.  An ArcMap session showing the distribution of 
randomly selected validation boxes.
    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
how to search pdf files for text; how to select text in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
search pdf for text in multiple files; pdf text select tool
ii.  Therefore, when looking for overlap areas 
between years, prioritize areas of overlap that are 
nearer to the centers of photos from at least one 
of the 2 years. 
(1)  It likely will be useful to produce a mylar 
overlay with a 1.5-km box on it for 
reference. It typically is easiest to draw a 
box in a graphics program where the size 
of the box in centimeters can be specified, 
print the box on a piece of paper, then use a 
photocopier to copy the box onto a mylar or 
overhead transparency sheet. 
(2)  The size of the box will be determined by 
the scale of the airphotos. For a 1:12,000 
airphoto set, the length of 1,500 m on 
the ground corresponds to a line 12.5 cm 
long, or a box 12.5 cm on a side. Note that 
the scale of a given photo will be slightly 
different than the desired scale of the 
acquisition for the entire photoset, since 
the elevation under the plane will change. 
This will be handled later in the image 
interpretation, so the point of the mylar 
box is simply to provide a guide for the 
approximate area being interpreted later. 
iii.  If at all possible, stereo viewing will be used 
for validation later, so it is best in this process 
to consider areas where stereo viewing can be 
achieved in both image dates. This requires that 
two sequential airphotos along a flightline are 
needed for an area to be a candidate for selection. 
2.  Develop a spreadsheet of possible airphoto-candidate 
pairs.  
a.  Each area determined in step 1 will occupy a single 
row in the spreadsheet.  For each of the two airphoto 
years, keep two columns to list the two photo IDs that 
will be used for the stereo interpretation of that year. 
b.  It may be advantageous to include another column 
that will allow this area to be found easily again 
on the landscape, because once the photo areas are 
subsetted, 1.5-km boxes will be drawn manually for 
the area of overlap. Thus, the area used to determine 
possible candidate-airphoto pairs should be stored in 
some manner. 
i.  The flightline information from each photo may 
be sufficient.
ii.  Or the X and Y coordinates of the upper-left 
corner of the 1.5-km box may be useful as well.  
To do this, the airphotos would need to be on 
a Geo-referenced dataset, such as one of the 
tasseled-cap images develop in SOP 2.  
(1)  Open the tasseled-cap image.
(2)  Open the digitized flightline.
(3)  Use the flightline information to find the 
point on the landscape corresponding to the 
candidate area, and then use the cursor to 
note the X and Y coordinates of the upper-
left corner of the box. 
(4)  Store the X and Y coordinates in columns 
for that purpose. 
3.  Determine how many areas can be photointerpreted under 
budget considerations. 
a.  Again, with no sense for the rate of disturbance, 
it is impossible to know how many samples will 
be needed to characterize the accuracy of the S2S 
process.  More is always better, of course, and if 
only 1 change is captured per validation box, then 
a sample smaller than 30 likely will be inadequate 
for anything but the coarsest estimates of error 
rate.  In determining this number, recall that only a 
small number of plots on any given airphoto will be 
photointerpreted, so the time per photo is relatively 
small.  
b.  A sample covering approximately 5 to 10 percent of 
the park is an excellent target.  
4.  From the spreadsheet, use the random number generation 
and ranking process described in section 1 to pick 
a random subset of the candidate airphoto pairs for 
validation. 
a.  In the spreadsheet developed in step 2 in this section, 
follow the sequence in method 1, steps 3c.(ii) above. 
5.  Create 1.5-km boxes for the validation areas.
a.  Because the grid of boxes is not available as it was in 
section 1 above, each 1.5-km box must be drawn in a 
new feature class in the geodatabase.
i.  Create a new feature class in the S2S feature 
dataset. 
(1)  The S2S feature dataset was created in 
section IV.1.c.
(2)  Follow the steps for creating a new S2S 
feature class within this dataset.
(3)  Name this feature class with components of 
the name that indicate the park, S2S, and the 
years for which change is occurring.  This 
feature class will first be used to conduct the 
standard S2S interpretation, and then a copy 
will be made for later interpretation with 
airphotos. 
SOP .  Validation of Change-Detection Products     
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online, convert CSV to save signatures to OpenOffice and CSV file. Viewer particular text tool can select text on all
convert pdf to searchable text online; text searchable pdf file
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
pdf text search; pdf select text
Table 2.  Satellite-to-satellite interpretation change 
classes.
Satellite-to-
satellite code
Description
1
No change.
2
Water to rock/soil.
3
Water to partial vegetation cover.
4
Water to complete vegetation cover.
5
Rock/soil to water.
6
Partial vegetation to water.
7
Complete vegetation to water.
8
Increase in broadleaf.
9
Increase in conifer.
10
Increase in vegetation.
11
Decrease in broadleaf.
12
Decrease in conifer.
13
Decrease in vegetation.
14
Increase in snow.
15
Decrease in snow.
(4) When creating the feature class, add the 
same 7 fields that are listed in table 1 
above (in method 1). 
b.  Bring a single date tasseled-cap image into ArcMap 
for reference. 
c.  Bring the new feature class into the ArcMap session 
and make it editable. 
i.  Select the Editor pulldown menu from the 
ArcMap session (see fig. 7), and select “Enable 
Editing.”  Ensure that the new feature class 
is selected as active in the layers list before 
enabling editing (i.e. its name is in the “Target:” 
window).
d.  For each area selected for validation, do the 
following:
i.  Draw a 1.5-km box to delineate the interpretation 
area.  As noted above, because these areas must 
be found from the spreadsheet of candidate areas, 
it is useful that those candidate areas have a tag 
or a coordinate pair that allows easy location.
(1)  To draw the box, ensure that the “Task:” 
window shows “Create new feature.” 
(2)  Click on the Pencil icon for sketching. 
(3)  Left-click on the image to position the first 
vertex of the box that will define the first 
corner.
Table 1.  Fields to add to feature classes used 
in satellite-to-satellite interpretation.
Field name
Field type
Change_type
Short integer
Dist_agent
Short integer
Certscore_change Short integer
Certscore_dist
Short integer
Box_id
Short integer
Event_id
Long integer
Comments
Text
Interpreter 
Text
(4)  Click on the first point of the box.  Right-
click and select Distance and Direction 
fields to ensure a square box with lengths of 
exactly 1,500 m.  
(a)  Tip:  When the third vertex is drawn, 
right-click and select ‘Square and 
Finish’ to draw the fourth vertex. 
(5)  Open the Attribute window for this layer (if 
not already open), and find the box that was 
just created (its row will be highlighted). 
(a)  Click on the cell corresponding to the 
“change_type” column.  Type in the 
number 1 in this box, indicating that 
the baseline condition of the box is no-
change (see S2S codes in table 2). 
ii.  Save after each box is coded. 
iii.  At the end of this process, all of the boxes 
that will be used for S2S validation and the 
subsequent airphoto validation will be digitized 
and saved into the feature class within the 
accuracy assessment geodatabase. 
Figure .  ArcMap interface, with a red oval indicating the area with 
editing options referred to in this section. 
100    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
pdf find and replace text; how to search text in pdf document
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Default create. Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page.
how to make a pdf document text searchable; search pdf documents for text
VI. Satellite to Satellite 
(S2S) Interpretation of 
Changes
Once validation boxes have been 
located and entered into the geodatabase, 
interpretation of changes can begin.  S2S 
interpretation is based on the principles 
applied to airphoto interpretation.  The 
human brain brings in spatial context to 
help interpret patterns of shape, color, 
and text to determine what is happening 
in an image. 
The differences between aerial 
photo and satellite interpretation are the 
scale of the analysis and the spectral 
depth of the respective image types. In 
high-resolution aerial photos, individual 
elements on a landscape (i.e. trees, 
small patches of rock, or small streams) 
are interpretable at a scale familiar to a 
human. In satellite imagery at the scale 
of Landsat TM/ETM+, such detailed 
features individually are not discernible. 
This requires some degree of retraining 
for interpretation.  Satellite imagery 
provides an important advantage over 
aerial photos in its increased spectral 
depth. Landsat imagery provides spectral 
information about the surface in the 
near infrared and midinfrared regions, 
both of which are extremely useful for 
distinguishing different cover types. The 
tasseled-cap transformation captures the 
variation in the six visible, near-infrared, 
and midinfrared bands of TM with just 
three axes, allowing display on standard 
The S2S process also requires that the interpreter 
understand how to interpret spectral patterns in images of the 
mathematical differences between two tasseled-cap images. 
Table 3 provides an interpretation key for difference imagery. 
This assumes that the image is displayed in a viewer with 
brightness in red, greenness in green, and wetness in blue.  See 
SOP 2 if this has not been set as the default for viewing. 
The interpretations in table 3 provide a first 
approximation of the likely change that has occurred.  The 
interpreter must then apply knowledge of the conditions 
before and after the change (using direct interpretation of the 
tasseled-cap images), knowledge of the ecosystem, and spatial 
context to further hone the interpretation.  Finally, reference to 
a single-date, high-resolution digital orthoquad can improve 
understanding of the potential land-use condition in which 
Table .  Interpreting tasseled-cap difference images when early image is subtracted 
from late image.
Color
Direction of tassled-
cap change:  
early to later
Interpretation
Grey
No change
No change
Bright red
Increase in 
brightness
Dramatic loss in vegetation, either because of 
disturbance or because of phenology; OR presence 
of cloud in later date.
Dark red
Subtle increase in 
brightness
Often associated with loss of vegetation from areas 
that were very bright and green at early date—a 
good example is a disturbance in shrub field or 
young hardwood/conifer plantation
Light blue 
to white
Increase in all  
bands, wetness 
especially
Increase in vegetation, especially conifer. Common 
in clearcuts that were vegetated partially in early 
date and which are increasing in HW and conifer; 
OR an increase in snow from a relatively vegetated 
starting point; OR presence of cloud in early date 
and conifer in later date.
Dark blue
Increase in wetness, 
potential decrease 
in brightness
Increase in conifer percent cover.  Common in 
clearcuts transitioning from hardwood or shrub 
dominance to conifer dominance; OR increase 
in shading in later date (take into account date of 
image); OR presence of cloud in later date; OR 
increase in water (channel changes).
Bright 
yellow
Increase in 
brightness and 
greenness
Typically, increase in broadleaf component, either 
shrub, grass or hardwood tree, caused either by 
recovery from disturbance or by phenology; OR 
presence of cloud shadow in the early date and 
vegetation in the later date.
Bright green Increase in 
greenness
Increase shrub/grass/hardwood cover from a 
condition that was bright before, but not green—
typically found when river beds come back to 
vegetation, but also common where snow was 
present before and now is gone. 
digital monitors in the three color guns (red, green, and blue). 
Color-infrared photography, when available, could provide 
insight into the near-infrared reflectance of the surface, but 
not typically into the midinfrared reflectance. The added 
spectral depth and interpretability afforded by the tasseled-
cap transformation of TM/ETM+ imagery requires further 
training to interpret, but increases the ability of an interpreter 
to describe conditions. 
Because of the need for training, the authors have 
provided an image library to be used in conjunction with the 
S2S interpretation process.  Before S2S interpretation begins, 
interpreters should use this library to gain familiarity with 
the main cover types and their representations in tasseled-cap 
space.  The library associated with this version of the protocol 
is “NCCN_Image_library_v1.0.ppt”.
SOP .  Validation of Change-Detection Products    101
Table .  Satellite-to-satellite disburbance agents.
Satellite-to-satellite 
disturbance 
agent code
Agent
1
Landslide.
2
Avalanche chute.
3
Fire.
4
Insect.
5
Fire or insect.
6
River disturbance.
7
Clearcut.
8
Unknown.
Table .  Certainty scoring for change classes.
[Score is assigned by the relative degree of agreement with the conditions 
statement, with zero indicating that the condition is not found. Change call: 
Total certainty score ranges from 0 to 4; Disturbance agent: Total certainty 
score ranges from 0 to 3]
Condition
Certainty points
Change call
Spectral change vector is distinct from change 
vector of similar starting types in surrounding 
area
0, 1, or 2
Area of spectral change is large and consistent 
within “patch”
0 or 1
Spectral condition of endpoints is interpretable 
and consistent with change call
0 or 1
Disturbance agent
Shape is consistent with disturbance agent
0 or 1
Size is consistent with disturbance agent
0 or 1
Landscape position and context are consistent 
with disturbance agent
0 or 1
interpretation is occurring.  A final change call is made and 
categorized into one of 15 categories, listed in table 2. This 
table can be printed out separately to provide an easy reference 
when onscreen editing is done.  
In addition to determining the change class, the 
interpreter makes a call about the disturbance agent (table 4). 
This is drawn from the combination of the spatial context and 
the observed spectral change.  
In assignment of both change class and disturbance agent, 
the interpreter may have varying degrees of certainty.  Degrees 
of certainty can be quantified using simple rules that describe 
the elements of the decision-making process when a change 
call and disturbance agent are identified.  Table 5  lists the 
conditions and scoring for certainty scores in the change calls 
and the disturbance agents. 
A variety of factors could lead to false positives in the 
automated change algorithms, and these must be filtered 
out by the interpreter.  To achieve this, the interpreter must 
be aware of the factors that can lead to false positives in the 
automated algorithms.  The following is a partial list of four 
major effects that the interpreter can take into consideration 
when evaluating the spatial patterns of spectral change. 
Geometric Misregistration
Even with excellent image-wide geometric registration 
of two images, local distortions can remain. These are 
mostly inconsequential, but if they occur at a boundary 
with sharply contrasting spectral types, even a small 
geometric shift can result in large apparent shifts in 
spectral value.  Thus, misregistration will manifest 
itself most strongly around small patches and linear 
features that contrast with their surrounding matrix 
(i.e. avalanche chutes, rivers, or small openings 
in the forest). A difference image will show that 
large change has occurred, but examination of the 
two source images separately will show that the 
shape and color of the area has not changed.  This 
indicates that misregistration has caused the spectral 
change.  Another clue comes from the shape of the 
apparent spectral change in the difference image.  If 
the difference is only at the margins of a small patch, 
and the complementary spectral change occurs on 
the other side of the patch, then misregistration also 
is implicated.  In cases where it is unclear whether 
misregistration plays a role, indicate the change type 
but give a correspondingly low confidence score. 
Illumination Differences:
After the summer solstice, the sun is lower at the time 
of each successive Landsat image acquisition, so the 
shadows get longer. Landsat images are acquired at 
approximately10:30 a.m. local sun time, meaning that 
the sun is approximately in the southeast, although 
the azimuth of the sun also varies with the seasons.  
The illumination variability caused by the different 
angles of the sun is sometimes subtle, but can cause 
some shadowing effects on the northwest aspects of 
slopes. For example, a small opening in the forest in 
1 year may appear to go away in another year, simply 
because the patch has fallen into shadow in the latter 
date. This can happen even with a difference of just 
a week or 10 days in the date of image acquisition, 
especially as days change more rapidly in late August 
and September. If it seems likely that shadow may have 
caused difference, do not include it.
102    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
The decision is not always straightforward. 
Illumination will cause bulk changes in reflectance for 
entire hillsides, but so can other effects. For example: 
Insect infestation can affect entire hillsides in forested 
areas.  
If it is difficult to tell, label the change, but score 
the certainty appropriately. In this case, because the 
spectral condition is not interpretable easily and 
because the signal may or may not be similar to other 
conditions, table 5 would indicate a certainty score of 
2. 
Year-to-Year Phenology Changes
Because the date at which cloud-free imagery can 
be acquired varies from year to year, and because of 
climatic variations between years, the phenological 
state of deciduous vegetation often varies from image 
to image.  This is true especially at the alpine/subalpine 
interface, where snowpack duration drives much of 
the timing from year to year. Changes in phenological 
state will have spectral manifestations that, although 
corresponding to an actual change in the state of the 
vegetation, do not represent a change in cover type 
or quality that is of interest in this work. Automated 
spectral change-detection methods will be fooled by 
this spectral change, but a human interpreter can often 
account for such phenological change by comparing 
the spectral changes in deciduous vegetation in one 
location with the overall spectral changes of similar 
vegetation in other similar parts of the landscape.  
If spectral changes are definitely associated with 
phenology, change should not be labeled.  If the 
change call is difficult, the certainty score should 
be adjusted accordingly. If all of the vegetation in a 
given type is experiencing similar changes, then the 
first change-call condition in table 5 is not met, so the 
maximum certainty score is 2, with likely lower scores 
because the other conditions are not met.  
Problems With Radiometric Normalization
Radiometric normalization with the MADCAL 
algorithm appears to be quite robust, but no automated 
normalization process is perfect.  The magnitude of 
errors in the fit between the two image years often 
scales with the brightness of the target. Thus, small 
errors in radiometric normalization can lead to spectral 
differences that are quite evident in the difference 
imagery used for interpretation.  When the two end-
point images also are referenced, however, there is 
often no apparent difference in the condition, because 
each image is displayed according to its own display 
scaling equation that compensates for the scaled error.  
Thus, it is often possible to rule out the apparent 
changes that are caused by radiometric error. 
VII. Imagery Setup and Satellite-to-
Satellite Interpretation Process
The actual setting up of imagery and S2S interpretation 
process is as follows:
1.  Create a tasseled-cap difference image for interpretation.
a.  In ERDAS Imagine, do the following steps:
i.  From the main icon panel, click the Image 
Interpreter button. 
(1)  This is the icon with the magnifying glass 
over a small raster box.
ii.  Select Utilities/Operators
(1)  The Two Input Operators dialog window 
will pop up (fig. 8)
(2)  The “Input File #1:” is the LATER date 
image (the changed image).
(a)  Use the entire study area, tasseled-cap 
image used in SOP 3 for the change 
detection (not the aspect-subsetted 
image). 
Figure .  Window used to create difference images. 
SOP .  Validation of Change-Detection Products    10
(3)  “Input File #2” is the EARLY date image 
(the baseline image).
(4)  The output file should be named to indicate 
both parent images, and should include the 
word “minus” in it, to clearly indicate that it 
is a difference image.
(a) This image is the “Difference Image” 
referred to subsequently in this section. 
(5)  Change the “Operator:” to the minus sign.
(6)  Change the output type to Signed 16-bit.
(7)  Click OK. 
2.  All of the interpretation is done in ArcMap. 
a.  Ensure that the following layers are present in the 
ArcMap project.
i.  The baseline tasseled-cap image (the baseline 
image was defined in SOP 3). 
ii.  The changed tasseled-cap image (the image from 
the later year). 
iii.  The difference image. 
iv.  A DOQ specific for the area being interpreted. 
(1)  Install the Terraserver add-in to ArcMap.
(a)  Terraserver provides free access to 
digital orthoquads that will be used to 
aid the interpreter to understand landuse 
in an area.
(i)  If Terraserver is not already installed 
in ArcMap, see information at the 
ESRI web site for instructions. 
(ii)  Generally, the steps for ArcGIS 9.0 
are as follows:
1.  At the ESRI support website 
(support.esri.com), click on 
downloads and search for 
 Terraserver.
2.  Download and install according to 
ESRI instructions
3.  This will involve the .NET 
architecture, which, if not already 
installed, also will  
need to be installed. 
4.  Once Terraserver is installed, it 
can be viewed within ArcMap 
using View/Toolbars/Terraserver.
v.  The feature class that holds the validation boxes. 
(1)  Select this layer and then enable editing on 
this layer, if not done already.
(a)  Select Editor/Enable editing.
b.  Begin with the first validation box where 
interpretation is to begin (created either by method 1 
or 2).  It likely is that a systematic interpretation from 
top to bottom or left to right in the study area will be 
easiest.  
i.  Open the attribute table in the feature class that 
holds the validation boxes.
(1)  Locate the current validation box in the 
attribute table.
(a)  The selection tool in ArcMap (a small 
white arrow next to a square with three 
small polygons inside) can be used to 
click and drag over the area of the box, 
selecting it. 
(2)  Fill-in the information on the box itself.
(a)  Label the box with a unique numerical 
sequential ID, beginning with 1.
(b)  There is no event ID for the box, which 
is no-change. 
(c)  Assign a change type of 1 (no-change; 
see table 2) by typing directly into the 
“change_type” cell for the row of this 
box, if the number is not already there.
(d)  Assign a certainty score of 4.  
(i)  This sets the background to the no-
change value. 
c.  With the difference image as the visible layer 
(checkmark in the Layers window), methodically 
work through the entire 1.5 km by 1.5 km box 
looking for spectral evidence of change. 
i.  In the difference image, no-change is shown with 
grey tones. 
ii.  Bright and colored areas in the difference image 
indicate large spectral change between years.   
Examine each patch of such potential change. 
(1)  Zoom into the area with the potential 
change. 
(2)  Turn off the difference image by unchecking 
the box.  Note which of the two tasseled-cap 
images is now visible – it will be the image 
that is higher up in the list of the layers. 
(3)  Then turnoff that image by checking its box 
10    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested