against which all future images will be referenced for 
radiometric and geometric normalization. This image is 
then split by aspect, clipped to the study area, and applied 
to a tasseled-cap transformation (SOP 2). For each aspect 
class, the methods of SOP 3 are applied to create a map of 
physiognomic classes for this image. These classes are then 
summarized using the field data collected in approximately the 
year 2005. The classes also are used to build the POM image 
for each aspect class for the field-collection era. These two 
POM images become the baseline images on which all further 
change detection will be based.
Once the startup phase is complete, the “Type 1 change 
detection” phase begins (fig. 7). Each year, a new image is 
purchased (SOP 1), preprocessed (SOP 2), and the POM rules 
for the baseline field-collection era image applied (SOP 3). 
Figure .  Steps in Type 1 change detection. An image from current year is normalized and applied probability-of-membership 
(POM) algorithms developed for the baseline images. From these POM baseline images, the POM images from the prior year are 
subtracted, creating POM difference images. These are translated into satellite-to-satellite (S2S) labels, which allows direct S2S 
validation.
III. Methods    1
These POM images are compared to the existing POM images 
from the prior year for detection and labeling of Type 1 
changes, and then validated using S2S (SOP 4).
When a new airphoto mission is acquired, the “Type 2 
change detection” phase can begin (fig. 8). In this case, the 
two images being compared must match the years of airphoto 
acquisition. The image for the year corresponding to the new 
airphoto mission already will have been processed under 
ongoing Type 1 change detection. The image for the year 
corresponding to the prior airphoto mission must be processed, 
however. The most recent year of airphoto acquisition is 2003, 
2002, and 1998 for Olympic, Mt. Rainier, and NCCN parks, 
respectively. Images from these years must be identified and 
processed to POM images, and the POM images compared 
with those derived for the year of the new airphoto acquisition. 
Pdf make text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf reader; search text in multiple pdf
Pdf make text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search text in pdf image; find and replace text in pdf
Figure .  Steps in Type 2 change detection. When a new airphoto mission occurs in the current year, Type 2 change detection 
occurs in addition to Type 1 change detection. The end date POM image from Type 1 change detection in the current year is 
compared to a POM image developed for the year corresponding to the prior airphoto acquisition (see text for dates of prior 
airphoto acquisition). Validation can include both S2S validation for Type 1 changes as well as airphoto validation for Type 2 
changes.
Standard S2S interpretation will be conducted on this decadal 
difference POM image (SOP 4). By matching images and 
airphotos, direct airphoto interpretation (SOP 4) also can be 
used for validation of Type 2 changes, which are by nature 
more difficult to unambiguously interpret from satellite 
imagery alone.
16    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
The steps are summarized in table 5. Although the 
details of the imagery years may vary slightly depending on 
availability of imagery and airphotos, the flow of the overall 
monitoring program should be very similar to the steps 
detailed in table 5.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
What should be noted here is that our PDF to text converting library Thus, please make sure you have installed VS 2005 or above versions and .NET Framework
how to select text on pdf; search pdf files for text
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp following sample codes demonstrate how to extract text from bmp of image file formats, so you can make all desired
search multiple pdf files for text; pdf select text
IV. Data Handling, Analysis, and 
Reporting
Because final change maps are the result of a long 
cascade of processing steps, accurate data handling is critical 
to the success of this protocol. Each step in the processing 
flow has different requirements.
Metadata
Metadata requirements for all steps in the image 
processing flow are in SOP 5. The goal of the metadata is 
to provide a means of replicating the processing steps. This 
allows better error tracking when problems arise.
IV. Data Handling, Analysis, and Reporting    1
Table .  Sequential phases in the monitoring program.
[Abbreviations: POM, probability of membership; NA, not applicable]
Phase
Description
Type of change 
monitored
Baseline 
image year
POM
Start year End year
Startup
Establish baseline 
image
NA
2005
Type 1 change 
detection
Change detection
Type 1
2005
2005
2006
Type 1 change 
detection
Change detection
Type 1
2005
2006
2007
Type 1 change 
detection
Change detection
Type 1
2005
2007
2008
Type 2 change 
detection
Change detection
Type 2 
2005
1998
2008
Type 1 change 
detection
Change detection
Type 1, etc.
2005
2008
2009
Database Design
Image processing does not use a database design. 
However, S2S interpretation (SOP 4) occurs within the 
confines of an ArcGIS geodatabase. Data entry within this 
database contains fields that allow full reconstruction of steps. 
Details of the database setup are in SOP 4.
Error Reporting
Reporting of error is an important consideration in 
validation. Error rates are often reported as summarized 
statistics, but many of these are deceptive and do not provide 
a full picture of true accuracy of a map (Congalton and Green 
1999). Therefore, full error matrices must be reported at the 
end of S2S interpretation. These are generated in SOP 4 using 
the ERDAS Imagine accuracy assessment tool, and can be 
summarized in a grid format (error matrix) as in shown in 
figure 9. Error matrices describe the counts of occurrences 
of agreement and disagreement between two types of 
classification.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a certain page to text and easily save Before you get started, please make sure that you have installed the
how to make pdf text searchable; text select tool pdf
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
We try to make it as easy as possible to Professional PDF to text converting library from RasterEdge PDF for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to
pdf text search; search pdf files for text
Figure .  An example of a full error matrix used to report validity of a change product.
Data Archival Procedures
Because of the large size of images, archiving of data is 
often necessary when immediate processing has finished. Final 
products (as defined in SOP 5) should be retained in their 
original format. Original imagery and intermediate products 
should be compressed and archived rather than deleted. This 
is especially important if later comparison reveal errors or 
new comparisons that require reprocessing of part or all of the 
image stream.
V. Personnel Requirements And 
Training
This protocol involves a wide range of detailed remote-
sensing interpretation, image processing, data analysis, 
field measurement, and photo interpretation. The authors 
have attempted to provide sufficient detail in the steps that 
personnel with moderate familiarity with computers and 
remote sensing can undertake most steps. Many of the detailed 
1    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
steps can thus be carried out by nonspecialists. However, the 
level of detail needed for image processing provides many 
opportunities for error that can be solved only with significant 
understanding of the satellite imagery being examined and the 
methods being used for its analysis. Moreover, integration of 
field, remote sensing, and other datasets requires significant 
understanding of each component.
Therefore, the authors envision a personnel structure that 
involves a single specialist who can provide overall guidance 
for processing teamed with other nonspecialists who can carry 
out many of the steps for each park. In the multipark setting 
of the NCCN, it may be efficient for a single group to take 
primary responsibility for technical processing of all imagery, 
and for pieces of the validation or interpretation to be carried 
out by each individual park. Because interpretation of change 
signals requires an understanding of the mechanisms causing 
the change, park ecologists, geomorphologists, and other 
specialists should be involved in the interpretation process at 
early stages.
Qualifications for a specialist overseeing this work 
include significant direct expertise in satellite-image 
processing and analysis, in geographic information-system 
processing, and in basic multivariate and univariate statistics. 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that the PDF file cannot be
how to search pdf files for text; pdf text select tool
OCR Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
page provides detailed information for recognizing text from scanned or doucments in Web Document Viewer, make sure that you Build, Save a Scannable PDF, PDF/A.
how to select text on pdf; text searchable pdf
The specialist also must have significant experience in 
airphoto interpretation. Nonspecialists will need less 
direct experience with image processing, but experience 
with geographic information systems and basic statistical 
knowledge are critical. Field technicians must be familiar 
with basic map concepts, and must have enough familiarity 
with geographic information systems and aerial photography 
to be trained in the interpretation of satellite imagery for field 
analysis.
The specialist can receive sufficient training from the 
protocol itself and from the image library associated with 
the protocol. The specialist will then take responsibility 
for training nonspecialists and field technicians in image 
interpretation, which forms the core of much of the 
processing. The specialist also must train nonspecialist and 
field technicians in airphoto interpretation, to the extent that 
each will be using it.
VI. Operational Requirements
Equipment
The primary requirement of this protocol is a computing 
system that can be used to carry out the image analysis. The 
protocol requires the following software: ERDAS Imagine, 
ESRI ™ ArcGIS, Microsoft Access (or equivalent), Microsoft 
Excel (or equivalent), and Microsoft Word (or equivalent). 
ERDAS Imagine should be purchased with the Vector 
Module, if at all possible. To allow processing of large image 
datasets, computers should have memory of at least 1Gb 
(gigabyte). Image processing requires the production of many 
intermediate image products, each of which can be hundreds 
of megabytes, making hard disk storage of many 10s of 
gigabytes essential. Facilities for printing of color maps are 
essential, especially for field validation efforts. Large-area 
plotters (>36 in.) are extremely useful for production of maps, 
but are not essential.
Airphoto interpretation requires facilities for storing and 
analyzing large numbers of airphotos. Stereo interpretation of 
photos is essential. Good quality stereoscopes make for good 
stereo interpretation, and are thus desirable.
Field validation requires basic field equipment (SOP 4), 
plus a Global Positioning System (GPS) and a digital 
camera. Good quality GPS units may work better under poor 
VI. Operational Requirements    1
conditions (such as in dense canopies), but even recreational-
grade GPS units can be sufficient for the accuracy of pixel 
location required here. A digital camera is needed only for 
field documentation, and thus can be an inexpensive unit 
designed for recreational use.
Startup Costs and Budget Considerations
Startup costs primarily involve purchase of data and 
software for image processing. Landsat imagery is currently 
$425 per image for historical data, and purchase of a mid-
1990s image likely is necessary for each park. Except for the 
extreme northwest coastal section of OLYM and, in certain 
TM images, the extreme southeast portion of North Cascades 
National Park, each park can be captured within the footprint 
of a single Landsat TM/ETM+ scene. ERDAS Imagine is an 
expensive software package, but has been purchased already 
by at least one GIS shop (Roger Hoffman, OLYM). Costs 
of airphoto acquisition may not be included as part of this 
protocol, since decadal airphoto acquisition already is planned 
for the airphoto-based monitoring program.
Annual Workload
The initial workload will be higher than the sustaining 
workload, as the specialist overseeing this work trains on each 
of the steps. After Landsat images have been acquired, initial 
processing of the first set of change images for a single park 
may take 2 months or more. Once this has occurred, several 
of the time consuming steps are reduced, and familiarity with 
the process should increase the proficiency of the specialist 
and nonspecialists in the processing. The time required for 
S2S validation will depend on the size of the park and the 
number of samples needed (determined in SOP 4). In testing 
for this project, nonspecialists trained in validation were able 
to validate eight validation box areas, each 1.5 by 1.5 km in 
size, in 1 day. Airphoto interpretation will take about twice 
as long. Final data analysis and map preparation will require 
approximately 1 month of the specialist’s time. Therefore, 
initial workloads for yearly change detection may be as much 
as four- or five-person months in the first year, but this should 
be reduced to 3 or fewer months in subsequent years. At the 
decadal scale, when airphoto interpretation is undertaken, an 
extra month or more will need to be added.
VB.NET Image: Start with RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK in Visual
dll: With this dll, users are capable of recognizing text from scanned documents, images or existing PDF documents and creating searchable PDF-OCR in VB.NET.
search pdf documents for text; how to select text in pdf reader
VII. References Cited
Bolstad, P., 2002, Eider Press, White Bear Lake, MN: GIS 
Fundamentals.
Bradley, B.A., and Mustard, J.F., 2005, Identifying land cover 
variability distinct from land cover change: Cheatgrass in 
the Great Basin: Remote Sensing of Environment 94, p. 
204–213.
Canty, M.J., Nielsen, A.A., and Schmidt, M., 2004, Automatic 
radiometric normalization of multitemporal satellite 
imagery: Remote Sensing of Environment 91, p. 441–451.
Chander, G., and Markham, B., 2003, Revised Landsat-5 
TM radiometric calibration procedures and postcalibration 
dynamic ranges: IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and 
Remote Sensing 41, p. 2674–2677.
Chavez, Jr., P.S., 1996, Image-based atmospheric 
corrections—revisited and improved: Photogrammetric 
Engineering & Remote Sensing 62, p. 1025–1036.
Civco, D.L., 1989, Topographic normalization of Landsat 
Thematic Mapper digital imagery: Photogrammetric 
Engineering & Remote Sensing 55, p. 1303–1309.
Cohen, W.B., Fiorella, M., Gray, J., Helmer, E.H., and 
Anderson, K., 1998, An efficient and accurate method for 
mapping forest clearcuts in the Pacific Northwest using 
Landsat imagery: Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote 
Sensing 64, p. 293–300.
Cohen, W.B., and Goward, S.N., 2004, Landsat’s role in 
ecological applications of remote sensing: Bioscience 54, p. 
535–545.
Cohen, W.B., Spies, T., Alig, R.J., Alig, D.R., Oetter, 
Maiersperger, T.K., and Fiorella, M., 2002, Characterizing 
23 years (1972–95) of stand replacement disturbance in 
western Oregon forests with Landsat imagery: Ecosystems 
5, p. 122–137.
Cohen, W.B., and Spies, T.A., 1992, Estimating structural 
attributes of Douglas-fir/western hemlock forest stands 
from Landsat and SPOT imagery: Remote Sensing of 
Environment 41, p. 1–17.
Collins, J.B., and Woodcock, C.E., 1996, An assessment of 
several linear change detection techniques for mapping 
forest mortality using multitemporal Landsat TM data. 
Remote Sensing of Environment 56, p. 66–77.
20    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Conese, C., Gilabert, M.A., Maselli, F., and Bottai, L., 1993, 
Topographic normalization of TM scenes through the use 
of an atmospheric correction method and digital terrain 
models: Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing 
59, p. 1745–1753.
Congalton, R.G., and Green, K., 1999, Assessing the accuracy 
of remotely sensed data: principles and practices: Lewis 
Publishers, Boca Raton, 137 p.
Coppin, P., Jonckheere, I., Nackaerts, K., Muys, B., and 
Lambin, E., 2004, Digital change detection methods in 
ecosystem monitoring: a review: International Journal of 
Remote Sensing 25, p. 1565–1596.
Crist, E.P., 1985, A TM tasseled cap equivalent transformation 
for reflectance factor data: Remote Sensing of Environment 
17, p. 301–306.
Crist, E.P., and Cicone. R.C., 1984, A physically-based 
transformation of thematic mapper data—The TM tasseled 
cap: IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 
GE 22, p. 256–263.
Egbert, D.D., and Ulaby, F.T., 1972, Effect of angles on 
reflectivity: Photogrammetric Engineering 38, p. 556–564.
Foody, G.M., 1996. Approaches for the production and 
evaluation of fuzzy land cover classifications from remotely 
sensed data: International Journal of Remote Sensing 17, p. 
1317–1340.
Foody, G.M., 2002, Status of land cover classification 
accuracy assessment: Remote Sensing of Environment 80, 
p. 185–201. 
Gu, D., and Gillespie, A., 1998, Topographic normalization of 
Landsat TM images of forest based on subpixel sun-canopy-
sensor geometry: Remote Sensing of Environment 54, p. 
166–175.
Gumbricht, T., McCarthy, T.S., McCarthy, J., Roy, D., Frost, 
P.E., and Wessels, K., 2002, Remote sensing to detect 
sub-surface peat fires and peat fire scars in the Okavango 
Delta, Botswana: South African Journal of Science 98, p. 
351–358.
Hayes, D.J., and Sader, S.A., 2001, Comparison of change-
detection techniques for monitoring tropical forest clearing 
and vegetation regrowth in a time series: Photogrammetric 
Engineering and Remote Sensing 67, p. 1067-1075.
Holben, B.N., and  Justice, C.O. , 1980, The topographic 
effect on spectral response from nadir-point sensors: 
Photogrammetric Engineering & Remote Sensing 46, p. 
1191–1200.
Kennedy, R.E., and Cohen, W.B., 2003, Automated 
designation of tie-points for image-to-image coregistration: 
International Journal of Remote Sensing 24, p. 3467–3490.
Kimes, D.S., 1983, Dynamics of directional reflectance factor 
distributions for vegetation canopies: Applied Optics 22,  
p.  1364–1372.
Kriebel, K.T., 1978, Measured spectral bidirectional reflection 
properties of four vegetated surfaces: Applied Optics 17,  
p. 253–259.
Lambin, E.F., and Strahler, A.H., 1994, Change-vector 
analysis in multitemporal space: A tool to detect and 
categorize land-cover change processes using high 
temporal-resolution satellite data: Remote Sensing of 
Environment 48, p. 231–244.
Maiersperger, T.K., Cohen, W.B., and Ganio, L.M., 2001, 
A TM-based hardwood-conifer mixture index for closed 
canopy forests in the Oregon Coast Range: International 
Journal of Remote Sensing 22, p. 1053–1066.
Malila, W.A., 1980, Change vector analysis: An approach for 
detecting forest changes with Landsat, in Burroff, P.G., and 
Morrison, D.B., eds.: West Lafayette, IN, Purdue University 
Laboratory of Applied Remote Sensing, p. 326–335.
Michener, W.K., and Houhoulis, P.F., 1997, Detection of 
vegetation changes associated with extensive flooding in 
a forested ecosystem: Photogrammetric Engineering & 
Remote Sensing 63, p. 1363–1374.
Muchoney, D.M., and Haack, B.N., 1994, Change detection 
for monitoring forest defoliation: Photogrammetric 
Engineering & Remote Sensing 60, p. 1243–1251.
Norman, J.M., Welles, J.M., and Walter, E.A., 1985, Contrasts 
among bidirectional reflectance of leaves, canopies, and 
soils: IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote 
Sensing GE-23, p. 659–667.
Oetter, D.R., Cohen, W.B., Berterretche, M., Maiersperger, 
T.K., and Kennedy, R.E., 2000, Land cover mapping in an 
agricultural setting using multiseasonal Thematic Mapper 
data: Remote Sensing of Environment 76, p. 139–155.
Parmenter, A.W.,Hansen, A., Kennedy, R.E., Cohen, W.B., 
Langner, U., Lawrence, R., Maxwell, B., Gallant, A., 
and Aspinall, R., 2003, Greater Yellowstone Land Cover 
Change: Ecological Applications 13, p. 687–703.
VII.  References Cited    21
Ranson, K.J., Irons, J.R., and Williams, D.L., 1994, 
Multispectral bidirectional reflectance of northern 
forest canopies with the advanced solid-state array 
spectroradiometer (ASAS): Remote Sensing of 
Environment 47, p. 276–289.
Richards, J.A., 1993, Remote sensing digital image analysis: 
An introduction: Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 340 p.
Roy, D.P., Lewis, P.E., and Justice, C.O., 2002, Burned area 
mapping using multi-temporal moderate spatial resolution 
data — a bi-directional reflectance model-based expectation 
approach: Remote Sensing of Environment 83, p. 263–286.
Royle, D.D., and Lathrop, R.G., 2002, Discriminating Tsuga 
canadensis hemlock forest defoliation using remotely 
sensed change detection: Journal of Nematology 34, p. 
213–221.
Sader, S.A., Bertrand, M., and Wilson, E.H., 2003, Satellite 
change detection of forest harvest patterns on an industrial 
forest landscape: Forest Science 49, p. 341–353.
Teillet, P.M., Guindon, B., and Goodenough, D.G., 1982, On 
the slope-aspect correction of multispectral scanner data: 
Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 8, p. 1537–1540.
Trigg, S., and Flasse, S., 2001, An evaluation of different bi-
spectral spaces for discriminating burned shrub-savannah: 
International Journal of Remote Sensing 22, p. 2641–2647.
Viedma, O., Meliá, J., Segarra, D., and García-Haro, J., 1997, 
Modeling rates of ecosystem recovery after fires by using 
Landsat TM data: Remote Sensing of Environment 61,p. 
383–398.
Weber, S., Woodward, A., and Freilich, J., 2005, North Coast 
and Cascades Network Vital Signs Monitoring Report: 
National Park Service.
Wilson, E.H., and Sader, S.A., 2002, Detection of forest 
harvest type using multiple dates of Landsat TM imagery: 
Remote Sensing of Environment 80, p. 385–396.
Woodward, A., Acker, S.A., and Hoffman, R., 2002, Use of 
Remote Sensing for Long-term Ecological Monitoring in 
the North Coast and Cascades Network: Summary of a 
Workshop: U.S. Geological Survey, available online at: 
http://fresc.usgs.gov/olympic/research/rswkspsummary.pdf.
This page left intentionally blank
22    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
I. Choosing Landsat Imagery
For the purposes of this protocol, we assume that 
image orders are for continuation of monitoring forward 
from the year 2005, and that images prior to 2005 already 
are in the possession of the parks. Two options for future 
Landsat imagery exist: Landsat 5 and Landsat 7. Landsat 
5 has been in operation well beyond its planned mission, 
and is therefore soon to be retired. Despite its age, it still 
provides reliable imagery, although slow deterioration of its 
mechanical components has required continual monitoring 
and readjustment (see http://edc.usgs.gov/products/satellite/
tm.html). Indeed, it was taken offline for 2 months at the 
end of 2005 to deal with a solar-array problem, but has been 
reinitiated as of January 30, 2006. Landsat 7 has superior 
technical specifications, but unfortunately suffered a major 
instrument malfunction in May 2003 that diminishes its utility. 
The choice of imagery will thus depend on whether Landsat 5 
imagery is available, and on the characteristics of the available 
Landsat 7 imagery. Landsat data continuity is mandated by 
Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Vegetation at 
North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) 1
Acquiring Landsat Imagery
Version 1.01 (September 1, 2006)
Revision History Log:
Previous 
VersionNumber
Revision Date
Author
Changes Made
Reason for Change
New Version 
Number
n.a.
07-05-06
REK
Final version under 
agreement
1.0
1.0
09-15-06
REK
Minor wordsmithing; 
separation of figures 
for publication
Preparation for 
publication
1.01
SOP 1.  Acquiring Landsat Imagery    2
statute, and plans exist for data continuity after Landsats 5 and 
7 cease functioning (http://ldcm.usgs.gov/). The Operational 
Land Imager (OLI) will be the immediate successor to Landsat 
7, and is planned for launch in 2010.
For the present, Landsat 5 imagery is preferable to 
Landsat 7 imagery because all pixels in a given scene will be 
from a single acquisition date. Imagery purchased as recently 
as 2004 has been reliable and geometrically robust. Eventually, 
Landsat 5 will no longer be functional. This could happen at 
any moment, and may be soon (although it has enough fuel 
to stay in orbit until 2008). Even if Landsat 5 imagery is still 
available, it may not be sufficiently free of clouds to be usable. 
In either case, Landsat 7 imagery likely will need to be used 
(although see note at the end of this section on Advanced Land 
Imager (ALI) and Advanced Spaceborn Thermal Emission and 
Reflection Radiometer (ASTER).
Therefore, discussion of the malfunction of the Landsat 
7 instrument is necessary. The instrument malfunction was 
the failure of the scan-line corrector of the satellite, and is 
discussed at http://landsat.usgs.gov/slc_enhancements/slc_off_
background.php. The following is taken directly from that web 
site:
This SOP explains the procedures for acquiring Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery for use in image-based 
monitoring. Procedures are provided for ordering imagery from the EROS Data Center (EDC).
“An instrument malfunction occurred onboard Landsat 7 on May 31, 2003. The problem was caused by failure of the 
Scan Line Corrector (SLC), which compensates for the forward motion of the satellite. Subsequent efforts to recover 
the SLC were not successful, and the problem appears to be permanent. Without an operating SLC, the ETM+ line of 
sight now traces a zig-zag pattern along the satellite ground track” (fig. 1).
“The Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) is still capable of acquiring useful image data with the SLC 
turned off, particularly within the central portion of any given scene. Landsat 7 ETM+ therefore continues to acquire 
image data in the “SLC-off” mode. Please note that all Landsat 7 SLC-off data will be of the same radiometric and 
geometric quality compared to data collected prior to the SLC failure.
“The SLC-off impacts are most pronounced along the edge of the scene and gradually diminish toward the center of 
the scene ….. The middle of the scene (approximately 22 kilometers with a L1G product) contains very little duplica-
tion or data loss, and this region should be very similar in quality to previous (“SLC-on”) Landsat 7 image data.”
Figure 1.  Effect of the Landsat 7 scan-line correction error.
Taken from 
http://landsat.usgs.gov/slc_enhancements/slc_off_background.php
.
2    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
USGS is continually updating approaches to deal with 
the gaps caused by the SLC failure. The general strategy 
is to merge image pixels from two or more different dates 
to provide a composite image without gaps. Because this 
results in a single image with pixels from different points 
in the growing season, it may introduce errors because of 
phenological progression of vegetation through the season. 
The effect of this gap filling is not known in advance for any 
given scene, since it depends on the images used to fill the 
gaps.
After November 18, 2004, gap filling was provided 
using the so-called “Phase 2” approach, which allows for 
filling from multiple scenes. A detailed description of this 
process is found at http://landsat.usgs.gov/documents/
L7SLCGapFilledMethod.pdf.
That document provides guidance on choosing which 
scenes should be used for gap-filling:
“The following scene selection guidelines are 
roughly in order of priority:
1.  Select fill scenes that are as free of clouds as possible 
and that contain as few obvious changes in scene content 
(e.g., different snow cover, waterbody ice cover/sun glint 
differences) as possible.
2.  Select SLC-off scenes that are as close in time to the 
primary scene as possible to minimize changes in 
vegetation conditions. Failing this, select fill scenes (SLC-
off or SLC-on) that are as close to an anniversary date as 
possible to take advantage of the similarities in seasonal-
vegetation cycles.
3.  Select scenes that provide good predicted gap coverage 
based on the gap phase statistics. These statistics predict 
the locations of the scan gaps in each scene relative to 
the Worldwide Reference System (WRS) scene center. 
Computing the difference between the fill scene gap phase 
and the primary scene gap phase makes it possible to 
predict (to within a few pixels) the gap overlap geometry.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested