XI. Summary
The processing steps described in this document take 
Landsat TM imagery from its original state when purchased 
from EDC (at the end of SOP 1) to the state that can be used in 
change detection (SOP 3). The following files are to be used in 
later steps:
1.  Study area AOI and vector coverages (section V).
2.  DEM clipped to the study area (section V).
3.   Aspect masks (both raster and AOI) for the NW and SE 
aspects (section X).
4.  Tasseled-cap imagery, split by aspect, for the study area 
(section X).
SOP 2.  Preprocessing Landsat Imagery    6
Pdf find and replace text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
select text pdf file; pdf select text
Pdf find and replace text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
find text in pdf files; convert pdf to word searchable text
This page left intentionally blank
66    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
and ASP.NET webpage. Find and replace text in PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
text select tool pdf; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for .NET, you can unzip the package to find the RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll in the bin folder under the root
search pdf for text; pdf text searchable
Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Vegetation at 
North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) 
Physiognomic Change Detection
Version 1.0 (July , 2006)
Revision History Log:
Previous 
VersionNumber
Revision Date
Author
Changes Made
Reason for Change
New Version 
Number
n.a.
07-05-06
REK
Final version under 
agreement
1.0
This SOP explains the procedures for detection changes in the physiognomic properties of the surface over time. It follows 
and relies on outputs from SOP 2 (Preprocessing Imagery). 
This SOP describes three phases in change detection. In the startup phase, the spectral space of a reference image for the 
parks is converted into probability-of-membership in physiognomic classes, and this forms the basis for all change detection in 
all subsequent years. For the type 1 phase of change detection, yearly changes are converted to that reference probability-of-
membership space and converted to S2S classes for interpretation (SOP 4). For the type 2 phase of change detection, images 
from years corresponding to dates of airphoto acquisition are referenced to that probability-of-membership space, differenced, 
converted to S2S classes, and then optionally backed up with direct airphoto interpretation. 
SOP .  Physiognomic Change Detection    6
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf search and replace text
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. you can download the RasterEdge .NET Image SDK and find the PDF processing component DLL
how to make pdf text searchable; pdf searchable text converter
Processing Datasheet
There are many detailed and sometimes complicated steps in this SOP. Because the analyst may need to split work between 
this work and other responsilities, we provide table 1 that can be printed out separately for the analyst to keep track of steps that 
have been completed. This should facilitate easier recovery from interruptions
Table 1.  Datasheet to keep track of steps in Standard Operating Procedure 3. 
[Abbreviations: SOP, standard operating procedure; TC, tassel cap; IMG, Erdas Imagine File; POM, probability of membership; CSV, comma-delimited text 
file; TXT, text file; PMR, Pacific Meridian Resources; S2S, satellite to satellite]
General information
Park being processed  
Analyst  
Change interval being processed  
Start of processing  
End of processing  
Section
Step
Filename 
SE
Section II (Startup Phase Only) Identify baseline TC image from SOP 2
IMG:
Create 25-class unsupervised classification image 
IMG:
Section III (Startup Phase Only) Collapse 25-class image into 9-class physiognomic image
IMG:
Section IV
Develop POM spreadsheets (Startup Phase only)
CSV:
Set up POM runfile template
TXT:
Section V
Calculate POM difference image
IMG:
NW
Section II (Startup Phase Only) Identify baseline TC image from SOP 2
IMG:
Create 25-class unsupervised classification image 
IMG:
Section III (Startup Phase Only) Collapse 25-class image into 9-class physiognomic image
IMG:
Section IV
Develop POM spreadsheets (Startup Phase only)
CSV:
Set up POM runfile template
TXT:
Section V
Calculate POM difference image
IMG:
Merged aspects
Section VI
Merge aspects
IMG:
Section VII
Tabulate plot data from PMR database (Startup phase only)
Plot Database:
Link PMR data with physignomic classes (Startup phase only) Summarized data:
Section VIII
Create S2S images
IMG:
Section IX
Sieve S2S images
IMG:
Section X
Convert to vector layer
Vector:
6    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK deployment on Visual Studio .NET
Unzip the download package and you can find a project XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Viewer Demo or XDoc.PDF.HTML5 Editor Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
how to select text in pdf reader; how to select text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF - Deploy VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer on Visual Studio.NET
to How to Build Online VB.NET PDF Viewer in Unzip the download package and you can find a project named XDoc Once done debugging with x86 dlls, replace the x86
make pdf text searchable; pdf editor with search and replace text
I. Required Input Imagery From SOP 2
Several of the images and associated spatial datasets from SOP 2 are required for SOP 3 They are listed here again for 
clarity:
1.  Study area AOI and vector coverages (section V).
2.  DEM clipped to the study area (section V).
3.  Aspect masks (both raster and AOI) for the NW and SE aspects (section X).
4.  Tasseled-cap imagery, split by aspect, for the study area (section X). One image must be defined as the baseline image (the 
early image) and one as the changed image (see Narrative, table 5, for more detail). 
Confirm that these files exist and that the locations are known. 
Figure 1.  Unsupervised classification window.
II.  Unsupervised Classification of Baseline 
Image
The baseline image must first be classified according to the spectral 
variation present in the image. This step will occur only in the Startup 
Phase of monitoring, and should be applied only to the baseline image 
(see Narrative, Methods section). Unsupervised classification using 
the k-means classifier is a common nonparametric approach to split a 
multivariate space into an arbitrary number of regions. For conventions 
on describing the steps and methods in Imagine, see section I of SOP 2
Carry out the steps in this section separately for both NW and SE 
aspects. 
1.  From the main Imagine icon panel, select “Classification” and then 
“Unsupervised Classification” from the list of options. 
a.  NOTE:  The following assumes that the tasseled-cap image has 
been displayed in your viewer with brightness in red, greenness 
in green, and wetness in blue.  If you did not change the 
defaults for display of three-layer images in SOP 2, section IX, 
change the default first, and then restart the classification. 
b.  The “Unsupervised Classification” window will pop up (fig. 1).
c.  In the “Input Raster File:” field, navigate to the aspect-
appropriate baseline tasseled-cap image.
i.  This image is the baseline tasseled-cap image created in 
the Startup Phase of monitoring (fig. 5 in the Narrative). 
Ensure that this image has been clipped to the study area 
and aspect masks (SOP 2). 
d.  In the Output Cluster Layer field, navigate to the desired directory and name the output file.
i.  Follow the conventions in SOP 5 Data Management for naming and locating this file. 
e.  Uncheck the box for “Output signature set.”
f.  Click on the “Initializing Options” button.
i.  Select “Initialize from Principal Axis.”
(1)  This option finds the dominant axis of variation in the spectral data and seeds the classes along that axis. 
ii.  Other options can be left as default values.
SOP .  Physiognomic Change Detection    6
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; In the following code table, you will find a piece of
how to select text in pdf; search pdf for text in multiple files
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
to PDF. Text: Delete Text from PDF. Text: Replace Text in PDF. In the following code table, you will find a VB NET code sample for how to set PDF file permissions
pdf searchable text; search a pdf file for text
g.  Click on “Color Scheme Options.”
i.  Select “Approximate True Color” and leave the 
band combinations as default. 
h.  In the Number of Classes field, type “25”.
i.  This will create 25 classes in this spectral space.  
The choice of 25 classes is somewhat arbitrary, 
since these classes will be collapsed later, 
but experience shows that it is a large enough 
number to separate real classes on the ground 
and yet small enough to interpret and integrate 
later. 
i.  In the Maximum Iterations field, type in “20”.
j.  Leave the convergence threshold at 0.950.
k.  Click on the AOI button.
i.  In the window that appears, select the button for 
“AOI File.”
(1)  The file-field dialog will become active.  
(2)  Navigate to the NW aspects AOI that was 
created in SOP 2, section X. 
l.  Click on OK button. 
i.  The progress meter will run as Imagine processes the 
image.  It will take several minutes.
2.  Repeat this process with the baseline image, but use the 
SE aspects AOI instead of the NW aspects AOI, and name 
the output file accordingly.  All other options are the 
same. 
3.  The result of this process will be two images, each with 
25 spectral classes.  
III. Collapsing Spectral Classes Into 
Simple Physiognomic Classes
The 25 spectral classes in section I must be compressed 
down to 9 simple physiognomic types (table 2). 
These types occupy distinct regions of tasseled-cap 
spectral space.  To collapse the 25 classes into the simplified 
classes, the tasseled-cap spectral space must be visualized, 
nearby classes noted, and then classes recoded into 
physiognomic classes. 
Conduct the following steps for both aspect classes. The 
examples below show the NW aspects case.  
Figure 2.  Create Feature Space Images window. 
Table 2.   Physiognomic classes for the North Coast and 
Cascades Network Parks.
Class number
Class description
1
Water/deep shade
2
Closed-canopy conifer
3
Conifer-broadleaf mix
4
Dense broadleaf/grass
5
Broadleaf tree/shrub
6
Mixed
7
Open: dark
8
Open: bright
9
Snow and ice
1.  Viewing spectral space of NW aspects using feature space 
images:
a.  From the main icon panel in Imagine, click the 
Classification button, and then select “Feature space 
image” from the list of options that appears. 
i.  The “Create Feature Space Images” window will 
pop up (fig. 2). 
b.  Input raster layer field:
i.  Use the open-folder icon to navigate to the 
baseline tasseled-cap image that has been 
clipped to the study area and to NW aspects.
(1)  Recall that the baseline image is the one at 
the beginning of the desired change interval. 
(2)  This image was created in section X of 
SOP 2
0    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
c.  Output root name:
i.  Imagine will produce a root name in the default output directory, which likely is not where it belongs. Thus, it is 
necessary to specifically indicate the directory to which the output feature space image should be placed.  
(1)  Navigate to a desired output directory. 
Follow the conventions of SOP 5 Data 
Management for placement of the output 
file.
(2)  Click on OK button. 
d.  Click on the AOI button
i.  Select “AOI File.”
(1)  The “Select the AOI file” field will become 
active.  
ii.  Navigate to the NW aspects AOI created in 
SOP 2 section  X. 
e.  Left-click and drag down through the three rows in 
the table at the bottom of the Create Feature Space 
Images window. All three rows (label 1,2,3) should 
be highlighted in yellow. 
f.  Click on the OK button. 
g.  Examine the image outputs.  For example, the 
feature space image for bands 1 and 2 – tasseled-cap 
brightness and greenness – are shown in figure 3.
h.  In figure 3, brightness (band 1) values are arranged 
Figure .   An example of a greenness/brightness feature space 
image.
from left to right, and greenness values are arranged 
from bottom to top. Color intensity corresponds 
to pixel count—red indicates the greatest number 
of pixels, magenta the fewest. Snow and ice are 
relatively rare and are high in brightness but low 
in greenness, and thus occupy a sparse population 
spread out in a tail from left to right in figure 3
Most of the pixels in this image (taken from the 
area around Mt. Rainier National Park) are forested 
and fall along a diagonal running from lower left to 
upper center in figure 3.  
2.  View the 25 spectral classes in this spectral space. 
a.  From the main icon panel in Imagine, click the 
Figure .   Create thematic feature space images window.
“Classification” button, then select “Feature Space Thematic” from the list that appears. 
i.  The “Create Thematic Feature Space Images” window will popup (fig. 4). 
b.  Thematic Input File:
i.  Use the folder icon to navigate to the unsupervised classification image for the NW aspects that was created in 
section II above. 
c.  Feature Space Files: 
i.  Use the folder icon to navigate to the brightness-greenness feature space image created in step 1 above in this 
section.
(1)  The brightness-greenness feature space image is noted by the phrase “_1_2.fsp.img” in the file name.  
SOP .  Physiognomic Change Detection    1
Figure .   Feature-space thematic image corresponding to the 
feature space image in 
figure 3
Figure 6.   Approximate locations of physiognomic cover 
classes in the brightness/greenness space.
d.  Output Root Name:
i.  Use the folder icon to open the file navigation dialog. 
ii.  As in step 1c above, it is useful to copy the default “output root name” onto the clipboard before navigating to the 
desired output folder. 
iii.  Navigate to the same folder in which the feature 
space images were placed. 
iv.  Follow naming and file location conventions in 
SOP 5 Data Management. 
e.  In the Feature Space Files field, navigate and select 
the greenness-wetness feature space image
i.  This is the feature space image with “_2_3.fsp.
img” in the filename.
ii.  When this is selected, a second row of filenames 
should appear in the table at the bottom of the 
window.
(1)  This second set of files will be placed in 
the correct directory, assuming it has been 
changed in step 2.d. above prior to this step. 
f.  Click on the AOI button and navigate to the AOI for 
NW aspects.  Click OK. 
g.  In the “Create Thematic Feature Space images” 
window, select both rows by clicking and dragging the 
numbers on the left-hand side of the table. 
h.  Click OK. 
i.  View the results.
i.  In a viewer, open the feature space 
thematic image. Figure 5 shows an 
example of the output for the same image 
shown in the feature-space image in 
figure 3.
j.  The colors in figure 5 correspond to the colors 
of the classes in the 25-class unsupervised 
classification image from section I. 
k.  To see which class numbers correspond to a 
given color in the feature space thematic, use 
the cursor utility.
i.  Click the plus sign icon in the viewer (just 
to the left of the hammer symbol; fig. 5). 
The cursor utility window will pop up. 
ii.  A crosshair will appear in the viewer.  
Click and drag at the center of that 
crosshair to move it through the feature 
space.  The class number will be reported 
in the “Pixel Value” column of the cursor 
window. 
2    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Figure .   Approximate locations of physiognomic cover classes in 
the greenness/wetness space (greenness on X axis)
3.  Identifying classes to combine. 
a.  Each of the nine physiognomic classes listed 
in table 2 will be composed of several spectral 
classes. A table of the nine classes and the spectral 
classes that make them up must be determined by 
the interpreter. Two tools can be brought to bear on 
this. 
i.  The shape of the brightness-greenness feature 
space in figures 3 and 5 is typical.  The 
physiognomic classes can be identified based 
on their approximate locations in this feature 
space. Indeed, the relative stability of these 
broad physiognomic classes across different 
systems is one of the key reasons that the 
tasseled-cap transformation was chosen as the 
base for change detection. Figure 6 shows the 
approximate regions of these physiognomic 
classes in brightness/greenness space, while 
figure 7 shows the same in greenness/wetness 
space. These general locations serve as the starting point for determining how to aggregate spectral classes. 
ii.  In addition to noting the position in spectral space of the physiognomic classes, it also is useful to use direct 
interpretation of the imagery to aid in labeling the spectral classes.
(1)  Load the image of the 25 spectral classes into a new Imagine viewer.
(2)  Select Raster/Attributes.
(a)  A Raster Attribute window with a table of the 25 spectral classes will appear, with a column for the color 
of each class in the image. 
(b)  To see where on the landscape a given class falls, use the left-mouse button to select the row of the given 
class, and then right-click on the color patch of that row to change the class colors.  Pick a new color that 
is unlike most of those already on the image–often white or black are useful. 
(c)  Examine where on the landscape the class falls to aid in interpreting the class.  Take into consideration 
known elevation patterns, as well as a general knowledge of the cover types in the system.  See the section 
in SOP 4 Validation on S2S interpretation (section VI) for tips on interpreting directly from tasseled-cap 
images.
(d)  When done with viewing the class, select “Edit/Undo last edit” to return the class to its original colors. 
(i)  When exiting the raster attribute editor, do not save changes. 
(3)  If desired, link the 25-class image with the original tasseled-cap image from which it was formed to aid in 
interpretation.
(a)  In a separate viewer, load the tasseled-cap image for the NW aspects.
(b)  Right-click anywhere in the classified-image viewer, and select “Geo. Link/Unlink.”
(i)  Left-click in the viewer with the tasseled-cap image. 
(c)  Open a cursor window in the classified image, if one is not open already.
(i)  Select the “+” symbol in the viewer with the 25-class spectral image. 
(ii)  Click the center of the crosshairs in the viewer to move the crosshairs around, and note spectral 
patterns in the tasseled-cap image to aid in interpretation of the imagery.
SOP .  Physiognomic Change Detection    
Figure .   Recode window, where the 25-spectral class image is 
recoded into 9 physiognomic classes.
Figure .   An example of record 
keeping for linking the 25-class spectral 
image with 9 physiognomic classes.  
(see 
table 2
).
(d)  Use the interpretation aids in the supplied “spectral library” 
that the authors have provided in an appendix to see examples 
of different cover classes on airphotos, in the field, and on 
imagery. 
iii.  In practice, class calls will not always be clear cut, especially for the 
physiognomic classes that involve mixtures of types.  While good class 
calls will improve the quality of later change detection, the method 
does not assume that the physiognomic classes will be perfect.  The 
classes will be converted later into a statistical representation based on 
these classes, adjusting the boundaries of the classes, and that statistical 
representation will further be described by ground and/or airphoto 
interpretation data to characterize within-class variability.  Finally, the 
method works on directional variation in spectral change and assumes 
overlap of classes.  Therefore, the precise definitions of the classes are 
less critical than in a project where the classified image was the single 
outcome. Nevertheless, the definitions of the class groupings may affect 
outcomes, and it is assumed that lessons learned about class grouping 
for each park eventually will need to be incorporated in a later revision 
of this Protocol.  See the Narrative section for a broader discussion of 
this topic. 
b.  Keep track of the link between the original spectral class number (1 through 25) and the new physiognomic classes (1 
through 9). 
i.  This can be done in a simple word processing document, or in a spreadsheet.  An example in Excel is shown in 
figure 8
4.  Merging classes.
a.  Once a physiognomic class is associated with each of the 25 spectral classes, the 25-class image can be recoded into the 
9 physiognomic classes (table 2).
i.  Open the 25-class image in a Viewer, if not open already.
(1)  NOTE:  This is the geographic image of the 25 classes, not the feature space image of the type shown in 
figure 5
    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested