how to open pdf file using itextsharp in c# : Select text in pdf file SDK software API .net winforms html sharepoint tm2g19-part1501

c. Copy the extracted class values back into the 
database. 
i.  In a Windows Explorer window, change the 
extension name of the .asc file to “.txt.”
ii.  Open the file in Excel.
(1)  Fixed width formatting will be necessary. 
iii.  Copy and past the column under “B1” (band 
1). It should contains numbers from 1 to 9, 
maximum (the nine physiognomic classes). 
It likely is that some of the classes will be 
underrepresented or absent because those regions 
of spectral space were not field sampled. 
iv.  Paste the values into a new column in the 
database.
3.  Group by the class. 
a.  The easiest approach is to conduct a crosstab query 
in the database software to summarize by the class of 
each plot.  
i.  Summarize both by mean and variance of each of 
the plot metrics (conifer DBH, broadleaf DBH, 
percent cover of live vegetation, etc.). 
VIII. Converting Change to Satellite-to-
Satellite Classes
Changes in the physiognomic classes can be viewed 
directly as continuous-variable probability-change images, 
which provide insight into the range of spectral change 
occurring.  However, these continuous-variable images are 
difficult to summarize visually or statistically.  Moreover, 
they are difficult to validate directly without substantial, 
quantitative airphoto interpretation that is beyond the budget 
or scope of the NCCN parks.  Validation of year-to-year 
changes must occur without photos, and thus for this protocol, 
direct interpretation of satellite images will form the core of 
validation (see SOP 4). The authors have developed a structure 
for S2S image interpretation of changes (SOP 4) that relies on 
15 classes of interpretable change and no-change (see table 3).  
To achieve later validation, then, the continuous-variable, 
nine-layer POM images must be converted into classified S2S 
images. 
To link changes in POM to S2S, a matrix of pairwise 
increases and decreases POM of the nine physiognomic 
classes is developed (table 4).  
Each cell in table 4 can be viewed as an hypothesis of 
change. For example, the greater the positive change in POM 
for the closed-canopy conifer and the greater the negative 
change in POM for the open: dark conditions, the more likely 
that S2S change class 9 is occurring (“Increase in conifer,” 
see table 3). By adding the positive POM change for the 
physiognomic class in each cell’s column header with the 
negative of the  POM change for the physiognomic class in 
the cell’s row header, a score for that cell is calculated that is 
more positive as support for that cell’s hypothesis grows. This 
score is the total probability change in support of a given cell’s 
hypothesis.
For each pixel in the study area, all cells from table 4 
that support a given S2S change-class hypothesis are 
compared, and the single best score is taken as the score for 
the hypothesis of that type of S2S change occurring in a given 
pixel. This is done for all 14 S2S change classes for each 
pixel, resulting in a 15-layer image with a 15-dimensional 
S2S score for each pixel. Then, a separate algorithm is used 
to identify the highest score and use it to label the type of 
S2S change occurring.  If that highest score does not pass a 
minimum threshold, then no-change is likely to have occurred 
and the S2S class 1 is assigned.
These steps of detecting and labeling changes have been 
distilled into two graphic models in Imagine. Therefore, 
the steps for conducting this process are achieved easily in 
Imagine using graphic models supplied by the authors. 
1.  Calculate scores for the S2S change classes by applying 
the rules from table 4 to the POM difference image 
created in section VI.
a.  In the main Imagine icon panel, click on the modeler 
button, and select “Model Maker.”
b.  Load the graphic model named “assign_s2s_labels_
to_9physclass_difference.gmd”.
c.  The model is shown in figure 20
Table .  Satellite-to-satellite interpretation change classes.
Satellite-to-satellite code
Description
1
No change
2
Water to rock/soil
3
Water to partial vegetation cover
4
Water to complete vegetation cover
5
Rock/soil to water
6
Partial vegetation to water
7
Complete vegetation to water
8
Increase in broadleaf
9
Increase in conifer
10
Increase in vegetation
11
Decrease in broadleaf
12
Decrease in conifer
13
Decrease in vegetation
14
Increase in snow
15
Decrease in snow
SOP .  Physiognomic Change Detection    
Select text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
select text in pdf file; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
Select text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
text searchable pdf; cannot select text in pdf file
Table .  Linking observed increases and decreases in probability of membership with satellite-to-satellite change classes.
[na, not applicable]
Inceasing
  No increases
  Water/deep shade
  Closed-canopy conifer
  Conifer-broadleaf  mix
  Dense broadleaf/grass
  Broadleaf tree/shrub
  Mixed
  Open: dark
  Open: bright
  Snow and ice
Decreasing
No decreases
1
1
9
10
8
8
10
1
1
14
Water/deep shade
1
na
4
4
4
4
3
2
2
14
Closed-canopy conifer
12
7
na
8
8
8
12
12
12
14
Conifer-broadleaf mix
13
7
9
na
8
8
13
13
13
14
Dense broadleaf/grass
11
7
9
9
na
11
11
11
11
14
Broadleaf tree/shrub
11
7
9
9
8
na
11
11
11
14
Mixed
13
6
9
10
8
8
na
13
13
14
Open: dark
1
5
9
10
8
8
10
na
1
14
Open: bright
1
5
9
10
8
8
10
1
na
14
Snow and ice
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
na
Figure 20.  Model used to calculate satellite-to-satellite scores based on probability-of-membership 
difference-image values. 
6    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
find text in pdf image; pdf searchable text converter
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
find and replace text in pdf file; search text in pdf image
d.  Save this model under a different name that is 
specific to the park and year of change being 
investigated. 
i.  Follow guidelines in SOP 5 Data Management 
for naming and placing the model. 
e.  Update filenames in the model.
i.  In the upper left, double-click on the raster object 
and change the name to the difference image 
created in section VI.
ii.  In the lower right, change the filename to the 
appropriate filename for the “POM to S2S class 
image” listed in SOP 5, Data Management.  
f.  Run the model by clicking on the lightning bolt. 
2.  In the model, select “File/Open” and open the second 
model in the sequence:  “detect_and_label_s2s.gmd” 
(fig. 21). 
a.  Save this model under a new name, again specific 
to the park and years of the images used for change 
detection. 
i.  In the raster layer at the top of the model, change 
to the file just created by the model in step 1 (the 
14-layer S2S score image). 
ii.  On the left is a box containing the scalar value 
that will be used as the threshold of change for 
change labeling.  This value can be changed.  
It currently is set at 80, which means that any 
pixels where the combined POM change exceeds 
80 for any cell in table 4 will be labeled as 
change. 
(1)  NOTE:  As noted in the Narrative, there 
is no single threshold of change value that 
is “correct.”  As long as maps of change 
explicitly describe the threshold used to 
make them, and as long as the error of a 
given map has been assessed using S2S 
(SOP 4) or other similar methods, they 
are legitimate.  It may be useful for parks 
to initially experiment with different 
probability thresholds to determine which 
thresholds appear useful. In practice, 
the parks may find that some threshold 
values are more useful over time for actual 
implementation and use by the various users 
at the parks. Additionally, the parks may 
find that some high thresholds are useful for 
some monitoring goals and lower thresholds 
for others. In either case,  suggested values 
for change thresholds could be added to this 
protocol later (see SOP 6). 
iii.  At the bottom are two raster layers that should 
be changed.  The lower-left image will be a 
single-layer file that records with ones and 
zeros if change has occurred or not, based on 
the threshold value.  The lower-right image is 
the labeled change image.  Name this image to 
include the park, the year of the change interval, 
and the string “_S2Slabel_”.  
(1)  Follow guidelines in SOP 5 Data 
Management for location of the images. 
b.  Run the model. 
Figure 21. Model used to create a change-label layer. 
SOP .  Physiognomic Change Detection    
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
pdf text searchable; search pdf files for text programmatically
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Enable users abilities to adjust color and transparency while scraping text from PDF file. Able to redact selected text in PDF document.
how to search a pdf document for text; select text in pdf reader
Figure 2.  Clump window. 
IX.  Sieving Out Small Changes Based 
on Satellite-to-Satellite Class
The result of the change thresholding and labeling 
process is an image that often contains “speckle”: individual 
pixels that pass the threshold-of-change rule spectrally, but 
whose change likely is the result of small misregistration 
errors. Typically, change-detection products are sieved to a 
minimum mapping unit that is large enough to eliminate most 
of these small occurrences, often 2 ha or more.  In this case, 
many monitoring goals require that small events be retained.  
Therefore, a minimum mapping size of only 6 (0.375 ha) 
pixels is recommended.  
Because there are 14 classes of S2S change, patches 
where change has occurred often contain a mosaic of similar 
S2S labels.  For example, regrowing clearcuts may include 
pixels labeled as increasing in broadleaf, conifer, and general 
vegetation. When individual pixels lie in a matrix of similarly 
themed pixels, they should not be sieved away.  Therefore, the 
14 S2S classes are first grouped before sieving.  The original 
labels will be reassigned after sieving.  
1.  Group S2S labels by theme.
a.  Open the graphic model “group_s2s_for_sieving.
gmd” (fig. 22).
i.  Save this model under a new name specific 
for the image being sieved. See SOP 5 Data 
Management for details. 
b.  Change the name of the two files. 
i.  The top file is the S2S change-label image from 
the prior section. 
ii.  The output will be a classified image with four 
classes. These four classes are regroupings of the 
15 S2S classes into common thematic elements:  
no-change, increase in any vegetation type, 
decrease in any vegetation type, and conversion 
of snow. Place this in a directory below the level 
of the change-detection files named “sieving” 
(create this directory if it has not been done 
before).  This file will be used only for sieving. 
(1)  Click on the AOI button, and navigate to 
the study area AOI (the entire study area, 
not just one of the two aspects) created in 
SOP 2.  
(a)  NOTE: If this AOI step is not done, the 
entire area outside of the study area will 
be assigned a value of 1, indicating no-
change.  
c.  Run the model.
2.  Filter out pixel groups that are smaller than 6 pixels. 
a.  Hit the Image Interpreter button in the main Imagine 
icon panel. 
i.  Select “GIS Analysis/Clump.”
(1)  The Clump window will pop up (fig. 23). 
(2)  The input file is the image created in step 1. 
(3)  The output file should be placed in the 
subdirectory named “sieving.” 
(a)  This is a temporary image that can be 
erased after this SOP is complete. 
Figure 22.  {Screen capture showing} model to group 
satellite-to-satellite labels by theme.
    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
how to search pdf files for text; search pdf for text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
how to search text in pdf document; pdf find and replace text
(4)  Click on OK. 
(a)  This will create an image where all 
connected pixels are assigned a clump 
number.  
ii.  Select “GIS Analysis/Sieve.”
(1)  The Sieve window will pop up. (fig. 24).
(a)  The input file is the clumped image 
from the prior step. 
(b)  The output file should be placed in the 
same “sieving” folder.
(c)  Set the minimum size to 6 pixels.
(i)  This is equivalent to a minimum 
mapping unit of 0.375 ha. 
(d)  Click on OK. 
(2)  The result of this process is an image with 
pixels labeled with the clump number.  This 
number is uninteresting.  But any pixel that 
has a non-zero value is one that survived the 
clumping. By treating this as a mask, the 
original S2S class image can be sieved using 
a simple graphic model.  Areas that did not 
have more than six adjacent S2S change 
pixels will be assigned a value of zero. By 
multiplying this image by the original S2S 
class image, the zeros will eliminate any 
pixels in the original 15-class S2S image 
that are isolated. This multiplication is 
carried out in the next step. 
3.  Apply the sieve filter to the original S2S image.
a.  Open the model “sieve_s2s_labels.gmd” (fig. 25). 
i.  Save this model using naming conventions in 
SOP 5 Data Management. 
ii.  This model multiplies the mask resulting from 
the sieve process by the S2S change-labeled 
image. Where individual pixels have been 
masked out in the sieved image, they are erased 
from the change-labeled image.  
iii.  Change the input files.  The upper-left file is the 
change labeled image from section VIII.  The 
upper-right file is the product of step 2 (the 
sieved image). 
iv.  Change the output file (at the bottom of the 
model).  
(1)  Name the output file using the conventions 
in SOP 5 Data Management. 
(2)  NOTE: The output type should be forced to 
thematic.
b.  Run the model. 
Figure 2.  Sieve window. 
Figure 2.  Model to sieve Satellite-to-Satellite 
labels. 
SOP .  Physiognomic Change Detection    
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online, convert CSV to save signatures to OpenOffice and CSV file. Viewer particular text tool can select text on all
text select tool pdf; how to select all text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
searching pdf files for text; how to select all text in pdf
The result of these steps is an image of S2S change 
labels. Pixels that are labeled with one of the 14 S2S change 
labels are those that meet the threshold of change criterion 
determined in the “detect_and_label_s2s.gmd” model and that 
are labeled according to the observed spectral changes. This 
product will be validated in SOP 4. Keep track of the name 
and location of this file. NOTE: This file directly fulfills one 
of the objectives of the protocol, and as such is considered a 
final product (see SOP 5). 
Errors in this product will be caused by several important 
factors.  Illumination differences, caused by changes in the 
date of image acquisition, will cause the change labeling 
approach to indicate changes to or from the water/shadow 
class when no real change has occurred.  Geometric 
misregistration will cause false positives in all classes 
when contrasting spectral type are adjacent to each other.  
Phenological change will cause the broadleaf classes to either 
increase or decrease in one image, resulting in labels that 
indicate changes in those classes. Note that this effect will be 
widespread if the cause is a phenological difference; therefore, 
if an individual patch shows a label of increase or decrease in 
broadleaf component, and surrounding patches do not, then 
the label likely is real.  
X. Converting to ArcInfo Polygon 
Formats
When change products are to be used in the field or in 
conjunction with other GIS data, it is convenient to convert 
them into an ArcInfo polygon-vector coverage.  
1.  Click on the Vector Utilities button in the main icon panel 
of Imagin.
a.  Select “Raster to vector.” 
i.  For the Input Raster, select the file created at 
the end of section IX—the labeled and sieved 
thematic layer.
ii.  Name the output vector layer and click on OK.
iii.  The Raster to Arc/Info Coverage window will 
popup (fig. 26).
iv.  Click on OK. 
This is the final-change product in this SOP.  
XI. Summary
The steps described in this SOP 3 take tasseled-cap 
imagery derived from SOP 2 to a state that describes change 
on the landscape in several ways.  Key products in this SOP 
are:
1.  POM lookup values. 
2.  Nine-layer POM difference images from the two dates of 
imagery.
3.  S2S-labeled change image(s).
Figure 26.  Window for converting an Imagine image to 
a polygon coverage.
0    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscape Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
convert pdf to searchable text online; pdf search and replace text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Default create. Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page.
select text in pdf; how to make pdf text searchable
Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Vegetation at 
North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) 
Validation of Change-Detection Products
Version 1.0 (July , 2006)
Revision History Log:
Previous 
VersionNumber
Revision Date
Author
Changes Made
Reason for Change
New Version Number
n.a.
07-05-06
REK
Final version under 
agreement
1.0
This SOP explains the steps for validating polygon-based maps of vegetation change and disturbance created in SOP 3.  
Because reference sources are variable among parks and depend on unknown future budgets, the validation strategy chosen 
is hierarchical. Direct validation from satellite imagery is the minimum validation that is necessary for change products, and 
requires minimal additional financial outlay. This approach allows yearly validation for the group of monitoring goals that must 
be monitored on a yearly or near-yearly basis (type 1 monitoring objectives; see Narrative). Photo and field validation of the 
those satellite-based validation steps can follow and provide a better understanding of actual error rates. Field validation is best 
for type 1 monitoring goals, photo validation for type 2 validation. 
Note that SOP 3 will produce a variety of continuous-variable-change products that precede the steps needed to produce 
polygons of change. Validation of such continuous-variable products would require many more field- or photo-validation plots 
than the methods for polygon-based validation, and thus are not considered part of this protocol. 
I. Overview
Validation is the process of determining how accurately 
the product from SOP 3 detects and labels changes. Typically, 
an accuracy assessment is conducted using a large number 
of sample plots where the labels from a change product are 
compared with labels determined by another, more reliable 
method.  For single-date landcover products, accuracy 
assessment can be achieved through a random sample of small 
plots. This is not necessarily the case for change detection. 
Most of a landscape does not change, so randomly placed 
small plots would primarily occur in no-change areas. To 
adequately test whether a change-detection method is accurate, 
a sample design balanced across change and no-change areas 
is desirable.  
Our approach is to use direct human intepretation of 
imagery to exhaustively label change within boxes that are 
much larger than the grain size of most disturbances on the 
landscape. Here, we use boxes 1.5 km by 1.5 km in size. Most 
of the area in these validation boxes will be unchanged, but the 
large size of the boxes will increase the chance of capturing 
change events. Once these events are digitized, random 
samples can be drawn equally from the change and no-change 
areas and used for actual accuracy assessment. 
SOP .  Validation of Change-Detection Products    1
Exhaustive description in 2.25 km
2
areas is difficult by 
most means. Field validation over such a large area essentially 
is impossible. Airphoto interpretation was tested as a means 
of doing such an exhaustive survey, but was found by the 
authors to be unreliable using typical airphoto-interpretation 
procedures. Instead, the authors found that direct interpretation 
of the satellite images, using methods borrowed from airphoto 
interpretation, proved to be a quick and reliable means of 
identifying changes on a landscape. We call the method S2S, 
shorthand for satellite-to-satellite interpretation. The key 
advantage of this approach is the availability of a difference 
image (an image of the mathematical difference in spectral 
values) to highlight areas of potential change.  This necessarily 
limits the accuracy assessment to those changes that can be 
detected and labeled from spectral-imagery alone. In theory, 
many small and subtle changes may go undetected. By testing 
against airphotos, we found that most of the changes of 
interest to the parks were, in fact, captured. 
Once S2S is used to identify change or no-change over 
a set of 2.25 km
2
boxes, small sample plots for accuracy 
assessment can be drawn from those areas using random 
sampling.  Additionally, these plots can be validated 
independently from airphotos if such photos are available.  
II. Required Products From Prior SOPs
This SOP requires imagery from SOP 2 and final 
products from SOP 3 
From SOP 2, the following are needed:
1. Study AOI and vector coverages (section V).
2. DEM clipped to the study area (section V).
3. Aspect masks (both raster and AOI) for the NW and SE 
aspects (section X).
4. Tasseled-cap imagery, split by aspect, for the study area 
(Section X). 
Confirm that these files exist and that the locations are 
known. 
From SOP 3, the following are needed:
1. Final polygon-based S2S change products (section X). 
Note that if two or more thresholds for change are used 
to create change products in SOP 3 (for example, one at a high 
threshold and one at a lower threshold), each must be validated 
independently. Currently, this protocol considers validation of 
only a single product. 
III. Software Used
In this SOP, geospatial-database visualization is more 
important than in prior SOPs. Therefore, here we introduce the 
use of ESRI ™ ArcGIS software for parts of the SOP.  ArcGIS 
provides easy onscreen digitizing and database updating.  
Although these functions can be achieved in ERDAS Imagine, 
they are more efficient in ArcGIS.  Moreover, ArcGIS is 
a software package familiar to most parks because of its 
ubiquitous use in GIS applications.  Therefore, relative to 
SOP 2 and SOP 3, parts of this SOP will contain less detail 
about ArcGIS commands and strategies, as local expertise for 
ArcGIS problem-solving likely is more robust than could be 
reported effectively in this document. NOTE: Within this SOP, 
we also assume that the user has installed ArcGIS components 
(here, version 9.0), specifically ArcCatalog and ArcMap. 
IV. Setting Up Validation Database 
Validation occurs within validation boxes that are 1.5 km 
by 1.5 km on a side. The interpreter will use standardized rules 
(section VI) to fully label the entire 2.25 km
2
area as either 
no-change or one of 14 other change categories. Interpretation 
will be based on the satellite image from the two dates of the 
change interval, a difference image of those images, and a 
high-resolution digital orthoquad for reference. All of these 
steps will occur within ArcMap, a module of ArcGIS.  The 
first step is setting up a database within ArcGIS to record 
and label digitized changes. This involves creation of a 
geodatabase and the feature datasets that will be used to record 
interpreted change calls. 
1.  Set up the database and feature set.
a.  In ArcCatalog, navigate to the desired folder.
i.  Follow guidelines in SOP 5 Data Management 
for naming that folder. 
b.  Right-click on the folder.
i.  Select “New/Personal geodatabase.”
(1)  Name the geodatabase.
(a)  This database will house all of the S2S 
interpretation for this park.  Feature 
datasets will be created that specify the 
years within which change is validated.  
Thus, the name should indicate only the 
name of the park, and the fact that it is 
for validation.
(b)  Follow guidance in SOP 5 Data 
Management for naming and placement 
of this database. 
2    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
c.  Create an S2S feature dataset for the specific years of 
change detection.
i.  This feature dataset will house the feature classes 
(polygon coverage-like datasets) that will house 
the accuracy assessment for this park and year.  
Therefore, this dataset should have a name that 
indicates the park name and the years of change.  
Because the accuracy assessment may include 
both S2S and airphoto and other accuracy 
assessments, the name should only include the 
park and the years of the validation. See SOP 5.   
ii.  Right-click on the new geodatabase.
iii.  Select “New/Feature dataset.”
(1)  Name the feature dataset.
(a)  Follow guidelines in SOP 5 Data 
Management for naming. 
(2)  Assign geographic properties to this dataset.
(3)  Click the Edit button.
(a)  In the Spatial Reference Properties 
dialog box, select “Import.”
(i)  Navigate to either of the tasseled-
cap images that were used for the 
difference-image processing in 
SOP 3.  We use these images as the 
reference because digitizing must 
match the pixel location of these 
images.  Do not use another GIS 
coverage for this purpose. 
(b)  Click OK to exit the Edit session.
iv.  Click OK to approve the new dataset.
v.  The new-feature dataset should be listed in the 
Contents pane of the ArcCatalog window, as 
shown in figure 1. 
Figure 2.  New feature class window.
d.  In later steps, new feature classes must be created 
or imported into this feature dataset.  The steps for 
creating a new feature class are provided here for 
later reference. 
e.  Steps for creating a new feature class within the 
feature dataset:
i.  Right-click on the feature dataset, select “New/
Feature Class.”
(1)  Name this dataset to uniquely identify it by 
park, year of change detection, and the fact 
that this is an S2S dataset. 
(a)  Follow guidelines in SOP 5 Data 
Management for naming. 
(b)  Type remains default (simple features).
(c)  Click next.
ii.  Use default configuration.
iii.  In the next window, new fields can be entered 
into the database. See figure 2 for an example of 
the starting point, before user fields have been 
entered. 
Figure 1.  ArcCatalog window showing the contents of a newly 
created geodatabase.
SOP .  Validation of Change-Detection Products     
1.  New fields can be added by typing directly into empty 
boxes. Field names indicate the kind of data that will be 
entered into the fields.  When new-feature classes are to 
be added later, the field name and the data type will be 
specified, e.g.:
a.  Field name = box_id
i.  Data type = short integer
2.  New fields can be added to an existing feature class in 
ArcMap as follows:
a.  Open the layer in ArcMap.
b.  Right-click on the layer and select “Attributes.”
c.  In the Options box of the Attributes window, select 
“Add Field.”
d.  The field name and data type are specified in a pop-
up window.
e.  NOTE: The new fields cannot be created if the 
feature class is open, or if it has been opened recently, 
in ArcCatalog.  It may be necessary to quit from 
ArcCatalog if ArcMap will not allow a new field to 
be added because the dataset is locked. 
V. Creating Validation Boxes 
Validation boxes will be chosen by one of two methods: 
(1) Grid placement, or (2) placement based on location of 
airphotos for later validation. 
Use method 1 if no airphoto validation is planned or 
possible. This will be the case more often than not, as airphoto 
validation will be possible only when appropriate airphotos 
exists on both ends of the change intervals. Assessments 
of yearly change-detection products for type 1 validation 
processes (disturbance, etc.; see Narrative) will use method 1. 
Use method 2 if two-date airphoto validation is planned. 
This will occur only when airphotos are available for both 
dates of the period.
If aerial photos are available only for a small portion 
of the desired area of monitoring, it may be necessary to use 
both methods.  Method 2 would be used to create a core set 
of validation boxes where photo interpretation can be used to 
validate the S2S interpretation method, while Method 1 can be 
used to expand the area over which the S2S interpretation can 
be used to validate the change-detection image from SOP 3. 
Method 1:  Creating Random Grid-Based 
Validation Boxes. 
1.  Create a new map in ArcMap.
a.  Launch ArcMap.
b.  Start ArcMap with a “New empty map” when 
prompted. 
c.  Immediately save this new map under a new name.
i.  It is recommended that a single-map project 
be used for all validation at a given park.  This 
map ultimately will incorporate layers for 
image interpretation and validation for many 
years.  Therefore, the name should include the 
park name and the indication that it is a map for 
validation purposes. 
ii.  Follow guidelines in SOP 5 Data Management 
for naming. 
d.  Load the following layers and images:
i.  Early date tasseled-cap image.
(1)  This typically is the “baseline” image in the 
change-detection methods (SOP 3).
(2)  For ease of interpretation, use the full image, 
rather than the aspect-split images. 
(3)  Be sure to use the radiometrically 
normalized images in all cases.
ii.  Late date tasseled-cap image.
(1)  This typically is the “changed” image 
defined in the change-detection process 
(SOP 3).
iii.  Study area vector layer.
(1)  This was defined in SOP 2, section V.
2.  Create a grid of potential validation boxes.
a.  Open ArcToolbox.
i.  Within ArcMap or ArcCatalog, click on the red 
toolbox icon. 
b.  In the ArcToolbox, select Conversion Tools/To 
Raster/Feature to Raster.
i.  Input feature:  The study area vector layer.
ii.  Field:  id field.
iii.  Output raster:  Name this according to the 
conventions in SOP 5 Data Management.
iv)  Output cell size:  Type in 1500 (for 1500 m).
    Protocol for Landsat-Based Monitoring of Landscaped Dynamics at North Coast and Cascades Network Parks
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested