U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Geological Survey
Techniques and Methods 6-A26
NetpathXL—An Excel
®
Interface to the Program NETPATH
Pdf text search - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
find text in pdf image; find and replace text in pdf file
Pdf text search - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search pdf for text; pdf text search tool
NetpathXL—An Excel
®
Interface to the 
Program NETPATH
By David L. Parkhurst and Scott R. Charlton
Techniques and Methods 6-A26
U.S. Department of the Interior
U.S. Geological Survey
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
how to select text in pdf reader; search multiple pdf files for text
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
pdf editor with search and replace text; how to select text in pdf image
U.S. Department of the Interior
DIRK KEMPTHORNE, Secretary
U.S. Geological Survey
Mark D. Myers, Director
U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia: 2008
About USGS Products 
For product and ordering information: 
World Wide Web:  http://www.usgs.gov/pubprod 
Telephone:  1-888-ASK-USGS
For more information on the USGS—the Federal source for science about the Earth, its natural and 
living resources, natural hazards, and the environment: 
World Wide Web:  http://www.usgs.gov 
Telephone:  1-888-ASK-USGS
Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the 
U.S. Government.
Although this report is in the public domain, permission must be secured from the individual copyright owners to 
reproduce any copyrighted materials contained within this report.
Suggested citation:
Parkhurst, D.L., and Charlton, S.R., 2008, NetpathXL—An Excel
®
interface to the program NETPATH: U.S. Geological 
Survey Techniques and Methods 6-A26, 11 p.
About this Product 
For more information concerning this publication, contact: 
Chief, Branch of Regional Research, Central Region, WRD 
Box 25046 
Denver Federal Center 
MS 418 
Denver, CO 80225-0046 
(303) 236-5344
Or visit the Central Region Branch of Regional Research Web site at: 
http://wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov
This publication is available online at: 
http://pubs.usgs.gov/tm/tm6a26
Publishing support provided by: 
Denver Publishing Service Center, Denver, Colorado 
Manuscript approved for publication, January 2008
Edited by Jon W. Raese
Layout by Margo VanAlstine
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
cannot select text in pdf; select text pdf file
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
search text in multiple pdf; converting pdf to searchable text format
iii
Contents
Abstract  ..........................................................................................................................................................1
Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................1
NetpathXL........................................................................................................................................................2
Installing DBXL and NetpathXL ..........................................................................................................3
Using DBXL  ...........................................................................................................................................3
Using NetpathXL  ..................................................................................................................................3
Summary and Conclusions  ..........................................................................................................................6
References Cited............................................................................................................................................6
Appendix 1.  NetpathXL Spreadsheet File ...............................................................................................8
Appendix 2.  Coding methods ..................................................................................................................10
Appendix 3.  Interfacing with PHREEQC ................................................................................................11
Figures
1–5.   Screen images showing:
1.  Options screen for DBXL ....................................................................................................3
2.  File browser using DBXL option 3 .....................................................................................4
3.  Options screen for NetpathXL ...........................................................................................4
4.  Edit screen for NetpathXL ..................................................................................................5
5.  Selecting the edit screen from the main screen of NetpathXL ...................................5
Tables
1.  Description of cells in a NetpathXL spreadsheet file. ............................................................8
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
The following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option.
how to make a pdf document text searchable; select text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
converting pdf to searchable text format; search pdf documents for text
Abstract 
NetpathXL is a revised version of NETPATH that runs 
under Windows
®
operating systems. NETPATH is a computer 
program that uses inverse geochemical modeling techniques 
to calculate net geochemical reactions that can account for 
changes in water composition between initial and final evo-
lutionary waters in hydrologic systems. The inverse models 
also can account for the isotopic composition of waters and 
can be used to estimate radiocarbon ages of dissolved carbon 
in ground water. NETPATH relies on an auxiliary, database 
program, DB, to enter the chemical analyses and to perform 
speciation calculations that define total concentrations of 
elements, charge balance, and redox state of aqueous solu-
tions that are then used in inverse modeling. Instead of DB, 
NetpathXL relies on Microsoft Excel
®
to enter the chemi-
cal analyses. The speciation calculation formerly included 
in DB is implemented within the program NetpathXL. A 
program DBXL can be used to translate files from the old DB 
format (.lon files) to NetpathXL spreadsheets, or to create 
new NetpathXL spreadsheets. Once users have a NetpathXL 
spreadsheet with the proper format, new spreadsheets can 
be generated by copying or saving NetpathXL spreadsheets. 
In addition, DBXL can convert NetpathXL spreadsheets 
to PHREEQC input files. New capabilities in PHREEQC 
(version 2.15) allow solution compositions to be written to 
a .lon file, and inverse models developed in PHREEQC to 
be written as NetpathXL .pat and model files. NetpathXL 
can open NetpathXL spreadsheets, NETPATH-format path 
files (.pat files), and NetpathXL-format path files (.pat files). 
Once the speciation calculations have been performed on a 
spreadsheet file or a .pat file has been opened, the NetpathXL 
calculation engine is identical to the original NETPATH. 
Development of models and viewing results in NetpathXL rely 
on keyboard entry as in NETPATH. 
NetpathXL—An Excel
®
Interface to the Program NETPATH
By David L. Parkhurst and Scott R. Charlton
Introduction
NETPATH (Plummer and others, 1991, 1994) is an inter-
active Fortran 77 computer program used to interpret net geo-
chemical mass-balance reactions between initial (or multiple 
initial waters that mix) and final waters along real or hypo-
thetical flow paths in aquifers or other hydrologic systems. 
The program uses inverse geochemical modeling techniques 
(Plummer and others, 1983; Plummer 1985; Parkhurst and 
Plummer, 1993; Glynn and Brown, 1996; Nordstrom, 2007) to 
construct geochemical reaction models by using chemical and 
isotopic data for waters from the hydrochemical system. The 
inverse model is a set of mixing fractions and mole transfers 
that exactly account for the changes in concentration of ele-
ments in the waters. Inverse models between selected evolu-
tionary waters are found for every possible combination of 
the plausible phases that can account for the composition of a 
selected set of chemical and isotopic constraints in the system. 
The processes of dissolution, precipitation, ion exchange, 
oxidation/reduction, degradation of organic compounds, 
incongruent reaction, gas exchange, mixing, evaporation, and 
dilution are included. It also is possible to account for changes 
in isotopic compositions of six elements: hydrogen (deuterium 
and tritium) and oxygen isotopic evolution is accounted for by 
mixing of waters (no fractionation or mineral mass transfer); 
carbon (carbon-13 and carbon-14), sulfur, nitrogen, and stron-
tium isotopic evolution is accounted for by mixing, mineral 
mass transfer, isotopic fractionation, and isotopic exchange. 
Finally, the inverse models can be used to adjust radiocarbon 
data for geochemical reaction effects and to refine estimates of 
radiocarbon age. The NETPATH software includes a data-base 
program, DB, for storing and editing chemical and isotopic 
data for use in NETPATH.
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text highlight function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
how to search a pdf document for text; how to make a pdf file text searchable
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
convert pdf to word searchable text; search multiple pdf files for text
   NetpathXL—An Excel
®
Interface to the Program NETPATH
NETPATH has been used to investigate geochemical and 
isotopic reactions in a large number of hydrologic systems for 
more than 15 years (see for example: Plummer and others, 
1990; Aravena and others, 1995; Plummer and Sprinkle, 
2001). The modeling concepts in NETPATH can be traced 
to geochemical mass-balance calculations originally demon-
strated by Garrels and Mackenzie (1967) and have evolved 
through a series of theoretical (Plummer and Back, 1980; 
Plummer and others, 1983; Plummer, 1992; Glynn and Plum-
mer, 2005; Parkhurst, 1997) and software contributions (Plum-
mer and others, 1975; Parkhurst and others, 1982; Plummer 
and others, 1991, 1992, 1994). 
More recently, inverse geochemical modeling has been 
built into the geochemical model PHREEQC (Parkhurst 
and Appelo, 1999) and its graphical user interface PhreeqcI 
(Charlton and Parkhurst, 2002) and into a spreadsheet 
program, SpreadBal (Bowser and Jones, 2002a, 2002b). 
Advantages and limitations of the NETPATH and PhreeqcI 
inverse modeling capabilities are discussed in Glynn and 
Brown (1996) and Glynn and Plummer (2005). NETPATH, 
PHREEQC (and PhreeqcI), and SpreadBal are all capable 
of performing basic inverse modeling. The strengths of each 
program are as follows: NETPATH allows for isotope frac-
tionation, radiocarbon dating, isotope mole balance, and redox 
processes. PHREEQC considers uncertainties in analytical 
data for elements and isotopes; it considers redox processes 
and isotope mole balance, but not isotope fractionation or 
radiocarbon dating. SpreadBal primarily is designed for alu-
minosilicate and clay reactions, with special emphasis on the 
variable compositions of these minerals.
The data entry program for NETPATH, DB, requires edit-
ing data one piece at a time. DB saves data in two formats: the 
.lon file contains the raw concentration data and the .pat file 
contains selected results from speciation calculations per-
formed by DB (total concentrations of elements, redox state, 
and isotopic compositions). NETPATH reads the .pat file to 
obtain the data needed for inverse modeling. 
Since the original publication of NETPATH, advances in 
computer technology permit replacement of the DB data-entry 
style with the universally familiar spreadsheet. NetpathXL is 
a revised version of NETPATH that can read an Excel spread-
sheet that contains the concentration data (Appendix 1). The 
speciation calculation, formerly in the program DB, has been 
moved to the program NetpathXL. Each time NetpathXL 
reads a NetpathXL spreadsheet, speciation calculations are 
performed and a .pat file is written; although the format of a 
.pat file written by NetpathXL differs from one written by DB, 
NetpathXL can read data from a .pat file created by either DB 
or NetpathXL.
DBXL has a feature that allows exporting solution com-
position data from the NetpathXL spreadsheet to a format that 
can be read by PHREEQC. In addition, capabilities have been 
added to PHREEQC to export solution compositions to DBXL 
(.lon file) and to export inverse models to NetpathXL (.pat and 
model files).
The purpose of this report is to document the programs 
DBXL and NetpathXL. In addition, the report describes new 
features added to PHREEQC that allow solution composition 
data and inverse models to be exported to NetpathXL. The 
report describes how to install and use the DBXL and Net-
pathXL, the format of the Excel spreadsheet created by DBXL 
and used by NetpathXL, the capability of DBXL to export 
data from a NetpathXL spreadsheet for use in PHREEQC, and 
the capability of PHREEQC to export data and inverse models 
for use in NetpathXL. 
NetpathXL
The NetpathXL spreadsheet has a fixed set of col-
umns and header rows (see Appendix 1, table 1). The pro-
gram DBXL generates a spreadsheet of the proper format, 
into which concentration and isotopic data can be entered. 
DBXL also can translate a .lon file [written by NETPATH or 
PHREEQC (version 2.15 or later)] to a NetpathXL spread-
sheet. Additional NetpathXL spreadsheets can be generated by 
copying old spreadsheets and clearing the concentration data. 
New chemical and isotopic data can be entered cell-by-cell or 
copied and pasted from other spreadsheets or files into Net-
pathXL spreadsheets. The calculation engine for NetpathXL 
is identical to NETPATH. Although the screen-painting data 
entry for NetpathXL appears identical to NETPATH, new 
routines are used that avoid the need for the ansi.sys device 
required by NETPATH (Appendix 2). 
New capabilities have been added to facilitate the 
interchange of data between PHREEQC and NetpathXL. 
DBXL can read the data from a NetpathXL spreadsheet and 
write a file with all of the solution definitions that is readable 
by PHREEQC (.pqi file). Thus, PHREEQC can be used to 
calculate inverse models or forward models by using data that 
were entered for NetpathXL. In addition, PHREEQC (version 
2.15 and later) can write files that are readable by DBXL and 
NetpathXL. The solution data defined in PHREEQC (SOLU-
TION, SOLUTION_SPREAD, and SAVE solution) can 
be written to a .lon file by using the -lon_netpath identifier 
in the INVERSE_MODELING data block. This file can be 
read by DBXL and converted into a NetpathXL spreadsheet. 
In addition, PHREEQC inverse models can be saved as .pat 
and model files by using the -pat_netpath identifier in the 
INVERSE_MODELING data block. PHREEQC adjusts 
concentrations in the process of finding inverse models. The 
.pat file written by PHREEQC contains these adjusted con-
centrations for each solution for each model, and each model 
is written to a NetpathXL model file, which can be read by 
NetpathXL. By using these files, NetpathXL can reproduce 
exactly a PHREEQC inverse model. This capability is use-
ful, for example, if inverse model development is done in 
PHREEQC, but radiocarbon-age dating is done with Net-
pathXL.
NetpathXL    3
Installing DBXL and NetpathXL
DBXL and NetpathXL use Microsoft Excel to store and 
retrieve data. Excel must be accessible on the computer on 
which NetpathXL and DBXL are installed.
The latest versions of the programs can be downloaded 
from the web site http://wwwbrr.cr.usgs.gov/projects/GWC_
coupled/netpath. The file will have the extension .msi, and can 
be installed by using the Windows Installer, which is available 
automatically in Windows XP and higher. As administrator, 
simply double-click on the downloaded .msi file. The pro-
grams will be installed in the C:\Program Files directory by 
default. It is possible to install as a nonadministrator if a dif-
ferent directory is selected. Once installed, the programs can 
be run through the Start Menu at the bottom left corner of the 
screen. 
The programs normally are installed in the directory c:\
Program Files\USGS\NetpathXL. Within this directory are 
subdirectories: bin, which contains the executables for Net-
pathXL and DBXL; database, which contains the database for 
the speciation model, db.dat, and the database of mineral stoi-
chiometries, netpath.dat; doc, which contains PDF versions 
of this report and the documentation for NETPATH (Plummer 
and others, 1994); and examples, which contains the data and 
model files for the examples described in the NETPATH docu-
mentation (Plummer and others, 1994). 
Using DBXL 
DBXL can be executed from the Windows start menu at 
the bottom left of the screen or by browsing for the execut-
able file (c:\Program Files\USGS\NetpathXL\bin\dbxl.exe) and 
double-clicking with the mouse. The user may want to add a 
desktop icon by right-clicking on the start-menu item or the 
executable file (Send To->Desktop). When the program starts, 
a screen (fig. 1) appears that has five options: (1) create a Net-
pathXL spreadsheet from a .lon file that has been written by 
DB, (2) open a NetpathXL spreadsheet (.xls suffix), (3) create 
a new (empty) NetpathXL spreadsheet, (4) create a PHREEQC 
Figure 1.  Options screen for DBXL.
input file (.pqi) from a NetpathXL spreadsheet file, or (5) exit 
DBXL. Options are selected by typing 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 followed 
by enter. Selecting options 1, 2, 3, or 4 will start the standard 
Windows file browser to select the file to be read or to specify 
the name of the new NetpathXL spreadsheet (fig. 2). For 
options 1, 2, and 3, after a file has been selected, an Excel ses-
sion will be started, and DBXL will close. For option 4, after 
a file has been selected, a PHREEQC .pqi file will be written, 
after which, DBXL will close (Appendix 3). Other functional-
ity of DB, including “Check” charge balance and “Print” data 
reports was not retained in DBXL.
Using NetpathXL 
NetpathXL can be executed from the Windows start 
menu at the bottom left of the screen or by browsing for the 
executable file (c:\Program Files\USGS\NetpathXL\bin\ 
netpathxl.exe) and double-clicking with the mouse. The user 
may want to add a desktop icon by right-clicking on the 
start-menu item or the executable file (Send To->Desktop). 
When the program starts, a screen (fig. 3) appears that has 
three options: (1) open an existing NetpathXL spreadsheet 
(.xls suffix), (2) open a .pat file created by DB or NetpathXL, 
or (3) quit NetpathXL. Options are selected by typing 1, 2, or 
3 followed by enter. After option 1 or 2 is selected, the stan-
dard Windows file browser is used to select a file. After a file 
has been selected, execution will be the same as the program 
NETPATH (except for one additional file-reading option); all 
options and data entry are by keystrokes, and the mouse is not 
functional except to give focus to the NetpathXL window. The 
working directory will be the directory that contains the file 
selected by the file browser.
If a NetpathXL spreadsheet is selected (option 1), a 
speciation calculation will be performed. A database file 
named db.dat is required for this speciation calculation. The 
default database file is found in the database subdirectory of 
the installation directory (c:\Program Files\USGS\NetpathXL\
database\db.dat). 
   NetpathXL—An Excel
®
Interface to the Program NETPATH
Figure 3.  Options screen for NetpathXL.
Figure 2.  File browser using DBXL option 3.
NetpathXL    5
tions by using the same options (charge-balance option and 
database file) that were used when the NetpathXL spreadsheet 
was originally read. (To reread the Excel file, but use differ-
ent options, select the option “Well file,” which will query for 
each option.) The current inverse model—wells, phases, con-
straints, and other options—is retained when the NetpathXL 
spreadsheet is reread. By using the reread option, concentra-
tion or isotopic data can be revised in the NetpathXL spread-
sheet and then quickly imported into NetpathXL. Typically, 
the Excel spreadsheet will be left open and the reread option 
will be used whenever changes are made to the spreadsheet. 
Note that the changes to the spreadsheet must be saved (File-
>Save within Excel) before the spreadsheet is reread. The 
capability to view Excel while running NetpathXL replaces 
the <V>iew option of the main screen of NETPATH.
Figure 4.  Edit screen for NetpathXL.
Figure 5.  Selecting the edit screen from the main screen of NetpathXL.
Another file, netpath.dat, contains the stoichiometry and 
isotopic composition of minerals, which are needed for inverse 
modeling calculations. NetpathXL will look for this file in 
the working directory (the directory containing the file read 
at startup). If it is not found in the working directory, the file 
will be copied from the database subdirectory of the installa-
tion directory (c:\Program Files\USGS\NetpathXL\database\
netpath.dat).
If a NetpathXL spreadsheet is read, one additional option 
is added to the edit screen that was not in the original NET-
PATH program. The first option of the edit screen is now “1) 
Reread Excel file” (fig. 4), which is not available in NET-
PATH. (The edit screen is invoked by typing “E” or “e” on the 
main screen of NetpathXL, fig. 5.) This option will reread the 
last NetpathXL spreadsheet and perform speciation calcula-
   NetpathXL—An Excel
®
Interface to the Program NETPATH
One additional option (<F>ont) has been added to the 
main screen (fig. 5). Typing “F” at the main-screen prompt 
will result in queries for font height, font brightness, and 
background brightness. The default font size is 16; specify-
ing a smaller or larger number (8 to 24) correspondingly will 
decrease or increase the font size used for painting the screens 
in NetpathXL. The default font brightness is 0.85; decreasing 
or increasing the number (0.3 to 1.0) correspondingly will dim 
or brighten the font. The default background brightness is 0.25 
(midnight blue); a value of 0 will produce a black background, 
and a value of 1.0 will produce a bright blue background.
Summary and Conclusions 
NETPATH is unique in the capabilities it provides for 
geochemical inverse modeling and radiocarbon dating of 
ground waters. NetpathXL is a partial modernization of the 
program NETPATH. NetpathXL simplifies data input by using 
a fixed-format Excel spreadsheet in place of the program 
DB. File browsing, installation, and concentration data input 
have the look and feel of current computer programs. The 
model-development process remains unchanged from that of 
NETPATH and requires keyboard input rather than point and 
click technology. However, keyboard input is efficient and the 
model-development process is simple and straightforward. The 
calculation engine in NetpathXL is identical to NETPATH. 
New capabilities have been added to allow the inter-
change of data from NetpathXL to PHREEQC and from 
PHREEQC to NetpathXL. DBXL can translate a NetpathXL 
spreadsheet file to PHREEQC format (.pqi). PHREEQC can 
translate solution compositions to a NetpathXL .lon file. In 
addition, each inverse model derived by PHREEQC can be 
written to NetpathXL .pat and model files, which allows the 
PHREEQC inverse model to be reproduced in NetpathXL. 
References Cited
Aravena, R., Wassenaar, L.I., and Plummer, L.N., 1995, Esti-
mating C-14 groundwater ages in a methanogenic aquifer: 
Water Resources Research, v. 31, p. 2307–2317.
Bowser, C.J., and Jones, B.F., 2002a, Mineralogic controls 
on the composition of natural waters dominated by sili-
cate hydro-lysis: American Journal of Science, v. 302, 
p. 582–662.
Bowser, C.J., and Jones, B.F., 2002b, Mineral mass bal-
ance documentation for SPREADBAL-2002: accessed 
January 24, 2008, at http://water.usgs.gov/software/ 
SPREADBAL-2002.
Charlton, S.R., and Parkhurst, D.L., 2002, PhreeqcI—A graph-
ical user interface to the geochemical model PHREEQC: 
U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet FS-031-02, 2 p., 
accessed January 24, 2008, at http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/ 
usgspubs/fs/fs03102.
Garrels, R.M., and Mackenzie, F.T., 1967, Origin of the chem-
ical compositions of some springs and lakes, in Equilibrium 
concepts in natural water systems: American Chemical 
Society, Advances in Chemistry Series, no. 67: Washington, 
D.C., chap. 10, p. 222–242.
Glynn, P.D., and Brown, J.G., 1996, Reactive transport model-
ing of acidic metal-contaminated ground water at a site with 
sparse spatial information, in Reactive transport in porous 
media—General principles and application to geochemical 
processes, Reviews in Mineralogy, Steefel, C.I., Lichtner, 
P., and Oelkers, E., eds.: Mineralogical Society of America, 
v. 34, chap. 9, p. 377–438.
Glynn, P.D., and Plummer, L.N., 2005, Geochemistry and 
the understanding of ground-water systems: Hydrogeology 
Journal, v. 13, p. 263–287.
Nordstrom, D.K., 2007, Modeling low-temperature geochemi-
cal processes, in Drever, J.I., ed., Treatise on Geochemistry, 
Volume 5—Surface and ground water, weathering and soils: 
Elsevier, p. 1–38.
Parkhurst, D.L., 1997, Geochemical mole-balance modeling 
with uncertain data: Water Resources Research, v. 33, no. 8, 
p. 1957–1970.
Parkhurst, D. L., and Appelo, C.A.J, 1999, User’s guide to 
PHREEQC (Version 2) —A computer program for specia-
tion, batch-reaction, one-dimensional transport, and inverse 
geochemical calculations: U.S. Geological Survey Water-
Resources Investigations Report 99-4259, 312 p.
Parkhurst, D.L., and Plummer, L.N., 1993, Geochemical mod-
els, in Alley, W.M., ed., Regional Ground-Water Quality: 
Van Nostrand Reinhold, chap. 9, p. 199–225.
Parkhurst, D.L., Plummer, L.N., and Thorstenson, D.C., 
1982, BALANCE, A computer program for calculating 
mass transfer for geochemical reactions in ground water: 
U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations 
Report 82-14, 29 p.
Plummer, L.N., 1985, Geochemical modeling—A comparison 
of forward and inverse methods, in Hitchon, B., and Wal-
lick, E.I., eds., Canadian/American Conference on Hydroge-
ology, 1
st
, Banff, Alberta, June 1984, Proceedings: National 
Water Well Assocociation, p. 149–177.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested