Topographic and BaThymeTric 
daTa consideraTions:
datums, datum conversion Techniques, and data integration
Part II of A Roadmap to a Seamless Topobathy Surface
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Technical Report  NOAA/CSC/20718-PUB
Pdf editor with search and replace text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf for text in multiple files; how to make a pdf file text searchable
Pdf editor with search and replace text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
text select tool pdf; how to search text in pdf document
noaa contributors
Lynne m. dingerson
NOAA Coastal Services Center
Charleston, South Carolina
October 2007
Coastal Services Center   
H. Jamieson Carter
Brian C. Hadley
Darcee Killpack
Doug C. Marcy
Steven C. Raber
Keil A. Schmid   
Adam K. Stein
Kirk J. Waters, Ph.D
National Geodetic Survey   
David R. Doyle
Jason W. Woolard
National Geophysical Data Center    
Lisa A. Taylor
Office of Coast Survey  
Frank Aikman III, Ph.D 
Mary C. Erickson
Jesse C. Feyen, Ph.D
Maureen R. Kenny
Edward P. Myers, Ph.D
Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory   
Chris D. Chamberlin 
Nazila Merati
U.S. Department of Commerce
Carlos M. Gutierrez, Secretary
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Jr., VADM USN (Ret.), Under Secretary
National Ocean Service
John H. Dunnigan, Assistant Administrator
Coastal Services Center
Margaret A. Davidson, Director
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
public void Replace(String oldString, String newString, RESearchOption option specified string text that match the search option from specified PDF page.
search multiple pdf files for text; how to search a pdf document for text
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
NET: Replace Text in PDF File. The following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search
cannot select text in pdf file; find and replace text in pdf
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
ABOUT THE SERIES: A Roadmap to a Seamless Topobathy Surface.........................................ii 
ABOUT THIS PAPER: Topographic and Bathymetric Data Considerations..............................iv 
INTRODUCTION..........................................................................................................................1 
DATUMS........................................................................................................................................2 
Orthometric Height Datums........................................................................................................4 
Tidal Datums...............................................................................................................................4 
Ellipsoidal Datums......................................................................................................................5 
DATUM CONVERSION...............................................................................................................6 
DATUM CONVERSION TECHNIQUES.....................................................................................7 
VDatum: Vertical Datum Transformation Software...................................................................8 
Overview.................................................................................................................................8 
Methodology...........................................................................................................................8 
Limitations and Error..............................................................................................................8 
Harmonic Constant Datum Method............................................................................................9 
Overview.................................................................................................................................9 
Methodology...........................................................................................................................9 
Limitations and Error..............................................................................................................9 
Interpolation..............................................................................................................................10 
Overview...............................................................................................................................10 
Methodology.........................................................................................................................10 
Limitations and Error............................................................................................................11 
No Conversion to a Uniform Datum.........................................................................................11 
Overview...............................................................................................................................11 
Methodology.........................................................................................................................11 
Limitations and Error............................................................................................................12 
DATA INTEGRATION...............................................................................................................12 
Preparation of Raw Points........................................................................................................12 
Grid Design...............................................................................................................................13 
CONCLUSION.............................................................................................................................14 
REFERENCES.............................................................................................................................16 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
framework class. An advanced PDF editor enable C# users to edit PDF text, image and pages in Visual Studio .NET project. Support to
make pdf text searchable; find text in pdf image
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
option). Description: Delete specified string text that match the search option from PDF file. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
can't select text in pdf file; searching pdf files for text
ABOUT THE SERIES: A Roadmap to a Seamless Topobathy Surface  
A topobathy digital elevation model (DEM) is a single surface combining the land elevation with 
the seafloor surface—and which can be used to examine processes that occur across the coastal 
and nearshore areas. A Roadmap to a Seamless Topobathy Surface (Roadmap) is a series of 
documents and maps that seek to improve and streamline the process of creating a topobathy 
DEM. The series aims to make topographic and bathymetric data and reference information 
accessible and make connections between data set quality and DEM application (such as coastal 
inundation modeling). Understanding the links between input data quality and application can 
help users create a DEM surface designed for a particular purpose, can help data collectors 
provide data sets that meet needs, and can assist technical users in defining their data 
requirements more explicitly. 
The Roadmap examines resources and processes associated with DEM creation, including the 
following: (1) available data resources, (2) processes to generate high-resolution DEMs that 
minimize error, and (3) examples of topobathy applications. The target audience for this suite of 
information includes technical users of surface data within coastal management groups, 
scientists, federal and state agencies, and local offices using topographic and bathymetric data 
for technical applications. The Roadmap may also be useful to managers who are involved in 
activities such as planning a data collection. This series of products will help detail the steps 
required to create seamless coastal maps—a task that has been highlighted as an important 
national need by the National Research Council. 
The first part of the Roadmap series is an inventory of available topographic and bathymetric 
data resources for the Gulf of Mexico: Topographic and Bathymetric Data Inventory: Gulf of 
Mexico (Gulf Inventory). The Gulf of Mexico coastal area was chosen for this project to assist 
data coordination efforts and to enhance geospatial capacity across the Gulf states. The Gulf 
Inventory is meant to increase awareness and use of existing topographic and bathymetric data 
sets, decrease duplication of effort, and strategically target data collections to fill gaps. It is a 
“snapshot” of data availability as of November 15, 2007, and it identifies location, collection 
date, and sources of available data sets. This resource is currently available on the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coastal Services Center’s website 
(www.csc.noaa.gov/topobathy/). The next Topographic and Bathymetric Data Inventory will be 
for the Southeast portion of the U.S., from Florida to Maryland. 
This document, Topographic and Bathymetric Data Considerations: Datums, Datum Conversion 
Techniques, and Data Integration (Data Considerations), is the second part of the Roadmap, and 
it strives to improve and streamline the process of creating DEMs by providing a review of 
available datum conversion and integration techniques. It describes the importance of 
establishing a uniform reference for multiple data sets and techniques for manipulating and 
joining data sets. This document provides information on vertical and horizontal references 
(datums) for data sets and addresses the need for and the importance of datum conversion. It also 
introduces available datum conversion techniques, details the resources necessary to use each 
technique, and discusses limitations and error for each technique. Once data sets have a uniform 
reference, many data integration techniques are available to create a topobathy surface that suits 
ii
C# PDF Page Replace Library: replace PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
You can replace an entire PDF page with another PDF page from another PDF file. All information, data on the original page are removed, including text, images
search pdf for text in multiple files; select text pdf file
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
Description: Highlight specified string text that match the search option from PDF file. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
how to make a pdf document text searchable; text searchable pdf
the final DEM application, and many common data integration techniques are addressed in this 
document.  
The third part of the Roadmap will highlight some common coastal applications that can benefit 
from a highly accurate, high-resolution DEM. This reference, which is not yet completed, will 
describe applications of topographic, bathymetric, and topobathy DEMs and address standards 
for input data and the resulting DEM for an application. This information will help guide users 
on the practical and potential need for, and uses of, coastal elevation data and also provide 
technical users of elevation data with information to create a DEM specific to the needs of their 
application. Some examples of applications that may be addressed are shoreline delineation, 
wetland mapping, and inundation modeling. This reference is now in development and will be 
available in online.  
iii
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
WPF Viewer & Editor. WPF: View PDF. WPF: Annotate PDF. Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. to PDF. Text: Delete Text from PDF. Text: Replace
how to select text in pdf image; search text in pdf using java
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
PDF to Text. |. C#.NET PDF SDK - Convert PDF to Text in C#.NET. Empower C# Users to Convert PDF to Text (TXT) in Visual C# with .NET XDoc.PDF Converter Library.
converting pdf to searchable text format; search text in pdf image
ABOUT THIS PAPER: Topographic and Bathymetric Data Considerations 
To understand the effects of a change in coastal water level or the impacts of inundation, a 
seamless surface that represents both the topography of the land and the bathymetry of the 
seafloor is necessary. Such a seamless topobathy surface can require high-resolution data and is 
an important factor when modeling processes (such as storm surge) that occur across the land-
water interface. The need for accurate seamless coastal elevation maps was highlighted in the 
recommendations of the National Research Council report on “National Needs of Coastal 
Mapping and Charting,” specifically with respect to the coastal management community.  
Topographic and Bathymetric Data Considerations (Data Considerations), the second part of 
the Roadmap series, strives to improve and streamline the process of creating DEMs by 
providing a review of available datum conversion and integration techniques. When developing a 
topobathy surface, it can be critical to minimize error where possible, and some error occurs 
when combining data sets to create one surface. It is essential to (1) consider the original data 
reference (or datum, a surface to which the data collection is referenced), (2) understand issues 
with and options for converting among datum references, and (3) use data integration techniques 
that produce a useful surface for the application. Data Considerations is designed to inform a 
technical user about elevation data reference and to help identify areas where error can be 
minimized. As data collection technologies grow more precise, techniques used to manipulate 
data sets must maintain the integrity of the original data. When a high-resolution, high-accuracy 
digital elevation model (DEM) is necessary for an application, it is critical to establish a common 
reference and use appropriate data integration techniques when combining data sets. For 
applications that require lower resolution DEM surfaces, it may not always be necessary to 
establish a common reference. 
For topobathy DEMs, which are composed of topographic and bathymetric data sets, datum 
conversion is usually necessary. Topography data sets are collected mainly for land-based 
applications (such as hydrology and habitat mapping), while bathymetric data sets are typically 
collected for applications relevant to the water level (such as navigation). Because of the 
difference in intended application, these data sets are collected using different datum references. 
The first step in creating a seamless topobathy surface that integrates these two data sets is to 
convert the data sets to a uniform reference. Tools and techniques, including VDatum, the 
Harmonic Constant Datum Method, and Interpolation, have been developed to approximate the 
differences between datum references. Data Considerations introduces each of these techniques, 
provides information on the data required and methods used, and describes the sources of error 
and limitations of each technique. In addition, it also describes the consequences for not taking 
datum reference for a DEM into account. This document is not a manual for execution of a 
specific technique; instead, it provides an overview of each technique, a description of the 
resources necessary to use the technique, and the relative accuracy of the transformation. In 
general, there is a trade-off between the necessary human or data resources necessary and the 
accuracy of the transformation. The choice of datum transformation mechanism should consider 
the quality of the existing data (input data and hydrodynamic data), available resources to 
enhance data, and the application for which the DEM is designed. Ultimately, all mechanisms 
iv
v
are limited by the number and spatial distribution of points tied to multiple datums, such as 
surveyed tide stations; hence, the elimination of error is not possible. 
Resolving the data reference issue will not eliminate all data mismatches; those stemming from 
differences in collection date, sensor, or impacts from a major event will persist in the data sets. 
Many can be resolved or generalized by using the appropriate data integration techniques. The 
keys to integrating data sets are selecting a grid that suits the application, knowing when to use 
interpolation and selection techniques, and knowing the cell-size and type appropriate for the 
application. Using data integration and datum conversion techniques appropriate for the final 
application will allow modelers to represent the surface with maximum accuracy and minimum 
cost.
INTRODUCTION 
In recent years, topographic (land-surface) and bathymetric (seafloor-surface) data collection 
technology has grown more precise, and high-resolution data have become increasingly 
available. Yet creating high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) that use multiple data 
sets can be complicated by data set mismatches in reference, sensor, or collection date. 
Resolving these mismatches—by establishing a uniform reference and using data integration 
techniques—is essential when generating a seamless topobathy DEM for a specific application 
(such as shoreline delineation, coastal flood zone mapping, wave modeling, coastal engineering, 
habitat restoration, and modeling of storm surge, inundation, or tsunami). This document outlines 
many important considerations when building a high-resolution DEM. Specifically, this 
document reviews available datum conversion and integration techniques that are especially 
important for high-resolution topobathy DEMs.  
A topobathy surface seamlessly represents the solid surface from the topography of the land to 
the bathymetry of the seafloor. This continuous surface is essential for modeling applications that 
span the land-water interface (such as inundation modeling). Unfortunately, while the names of 
the two surface types combine easily to form the blended topobathy name, the data collections 
for each type cannot be combined as easily because they use different reference surfaces 
(datums). The reference surfaces are chosen with the final application in mind, and topographic 
surfaces are used for different purposes than bathymetric surfaces. Topography is generally 
collected for land-based applications (such as hydrology and habitat mapping), and bathymetry is 
collected for applications that are relevant to the level of the water (such as navigation). When 
applications require a topobathy surface, it is critical to understand how to combine these data 
sets using datum conversion and integration techniques to minimize error in high-resolution 
DEMs. 
Particularly for high-resolution applications, datum conversion techniques should be used (where 
possible) to establish a common reference system among data sets. Conversion techniques (such 
as VDatum, the Harmonic Constant Datum Method, and Linear Interpolation) can be used to 
transform data sets to a uniform reference. When selecting a method, it is important to consider 
the information necessary to apply the technique, advantages to the approach, error associated 
with the process, and limitations to its use. If the data set references are not resolved to a uniform 
reference, error is introduced into the final model. For low-resolution applications, converting 
data sets to a uniform reference is not always cost-effective because the error introduced by 
inconsistent data reference is outweighed by the generalization over a large grid cell size. Once 
data sets have a consistent reference, some data integration is usually still required to make the 
data sets seamless. 
Differing reference surfaces are not the only reason for data set mismatches; mismatches can 
occur because of differing collection dates, seasons, or sensors. Data integration techniques can 
help resolve additional conflicts. Three such techniques, involving data subsets, point selection 
methods, and grid cell size and structure, are discussed in this document. 
The goal of a topobathy DEM is to accurately represent the surface of the Earth, but the degree 
of accuracy that is necessary and achievable will vary depending on the application. High-
1
resolution applications and applications where changes in slope are particularly important require 
a higher degree of accuracy than low-resolution applications. Several lower-resolution topobathy 
products are available (including the 5 arc-minute TerrainBase, 2 arc-minute ETOPO2, and 3 
arc-second Coastal Relief Model), but they are too coarse for many applications in coastal 
management. These topobathy DEMs do not correct for vertical or horizontal reference, but the 
area over which the elevation is averaged is large enough that correcting for datum reference 
would not make a substantial difference in the application of the DEM. Minimizing sources of 
error by using datum conversion and data integration techniques (as described in this document) 
is critical when the final product is a high-resolution DEM. 
One application of a high-resolution topobathy DEM is modeling inundation from storm surge. 
Storm surge modelers can use a highly accurate DEM to analyze areas of greatest vulnerability 
during a storm event. The data sets that comprise this DEM must have a uniform reference or the 
accuracy is compromised. For example, if reference is not taken into account and the offset 
between two adjacent data sets is two feet, the DEM will indicate the existence of a two-foot 
drop-off at the intersection. If this DEM were used for storm surge modeling, the water would 
behave differently because of this drop-off, and the prediction of inundated areas would be 
inaccurate. 
Storm surge modelers commonly request the best currently available data sets that have a 
common datum reference. In many cases, this stated request is overly broad and does not identify 
the actual needs for data standards of the DEM. The question that should be asked is the 
following: What data are needed to represent the surface with sufficient accuracy for a specific 
application? To answer that question, modelers need to consider spacing and resolution, currency 
requirements, acceptable error, and delivery format for the final product. In some cases, the “best 
available” data set may not actually meet the needs of the final product. Much of the uncertainty 
in the answer to this question stems from uncertainty about model sensitivity. There is no general 
understanding of the impact on model results when topography or bathymetry is in error by a 
meter or 10 meters. The modeling community is beginning to address some of the questions 
associated with model sensitivity and evaluate the trade-offs involved with the answers. For 
example, storm surge and tsunami inundation modeling are generally similar, but each requires a 
unique evaluation of model sensitivity to various data parameters. This illustrates the need for 
experts in their fields to help define required data standards, as opposed to simply using the “best 
available.”  
The final modeling application must be considered when making early design and data set 
decisions to streamline the process and make it cost-effective. This document will focus 
primarily on necessary considerations when integrating topographic and bathymetric data into a 
single, uniform topobathy DEM. 
DATUMS 
When integrating multiple data sets, it is important to ensure that all data sets are referenced to 
the same horizontal and vertical datum. Neglecting this step will introduce avoidable error into 
the final elevation surface. Each topographic or bathymetric data set is, or should be, referenced 
to a horizontal and a vertical datum.  
2
A horizontal datum  is an established reference for location along a horizontal surface and 
is based on a geometric model.  
A vertical datum  is an established surface that serves as a reference to measure or model 
heights and depths. Vertical datums are based on physical models, geometric/gravimetric 
models, or tidal models. Individual terrain (topography and bathymetry) data sets for 
topobathy surfaces will almost certainly be referenced to different vertical datums, 
including orthometric, tidal, and ellipsoidal datums. Each of these datums is best suited 
for particular applications, such as water flow, navigation, and satellite positioning, 
respectively.  
Figure 1 depicts the relationship between the Earth’s surface, the geoid, and the ellipsoid, and the 
figure is referred to throughout the following sections. The blue surface represents the surface of 
the Earth, and the green and red surfaces represent the geoid and ellipsoid reference surfaces, 
respectively. H is the distance (or height) between the Earth’s surface and the geoid surface, and 
h is the distance (or height) between the Earth’s surface and the ellipsoid. N is the distance (or 
height) between the geoid and the ellipsoid, which can be used to convert the reference of a data 
set. The height value for H, h, and N can be positive or negative depending on the spatial 
relationship of the surfaces. In the equation below, N is in brackets because the figure indicates 
that N is a negative number. 
Figure 1: Relationship of orthometric and ellipsoidal surfaces to the surface of the Earth. The blue surface represents 
the Earth’s surface and the red and green surfaces represent the ellipsoid and the geoid, respectively. (Source: 
NOAA National Geodetic Survey) 
3
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested