how to open pdf file using itextsharp in c# : Search pdf files for text SDK Library service wpf asp.net web page dnn topographic-and-bathymetric-data-considerations1-part1518

Orthometric Height Datums 
Simply put, an orthometric height is the height of a point on a surface (such as the Earth) above 
or below a modeled surface (the geoid). The geoid is a physical and gravitational model that 
approximates the Earth’s equipotential surface—a modeled surface where the potential of gravity 
(geopotential) is the same everywhere. It is also meant to be a best fit to global mean sea level 
(MSL). The geoid surface is not a surface you can see or measure directly but is modeled from 
gravity, benchmark, and positioning data. The orthometric height reference is particularly useful 
when dealing with flow of water over land, since uniform gravity gives a clear indication of 
where water should flow. 
The Earth's gravity field—determined using observations from terrestrial, airborne, and satellite 
gravimeters—can be used to determine the geoid because both gravity and the geoid shape are 
derived from the distribution of the Earth's masses. In general, land masses and density 
variations in the crust, mantle, and core account for much of the variation in the height of the 
geoid surface.  
The North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88) is the official orthometric vertical 
datum reference for most of the U.S. It is available for the contiguous U.S. and limited parts of 
Alaska; however, the remaining U.S. coastlines, such as the Pacific and Caribbean Islands, use 
separate orthometric references (such as the Puerto Rico Vertical Datum of 2002 (PRVD02) or 
the Guam Vertical Datum of 2002 (GUVD04)). In cases where there is no unified reference 
(such as Hawaii and the Virgin Islands), most data collections rely on local datums.  
NAVD88, which is fixed to MSL at one tidal station in Quebec, Canada, superseded the National 
Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD29), which is based on 26 tidal controls but which has 
substantial errors (because MSL does not follow the geoid). NAVD88 was affirmed as the 
official civilian vertical datum for the U.S. by a notice in the Federal Register on June 24, 1993, 
by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). The notice stated any surveying or 
mapping activities performed or financed by the federal government be referenced to NAVD88. 
In addition, it required that all federal agencies using or producing vertical height information 
undertake an orderly transition to NAVD88. NAVD88 is a great improvement, since the 
difference between the two reference surfaces can be as much as 1.4 meters in the conterminous 
U.S. Converting between NGVD29 and NAVD88 can be accomplished in many ways, including 
using VERTCON (a conversion program that uses grids of the difference between the two 
datums to perform the conversion). The geoid is updated approximately every three years 
because of advancements in the ability to estimate the gravitational potential of an area, and the 
current geoid reference for the U.S. is GEOID03. (www.ngs.noaa.gov/GEOID/
Tidal Datums 
Tidal datums are water elevation averages over a given period, and there are a number of tidal 
reference surfaces from which to choose. MSL is the average of water levels recorded hourly at a 
single location, whereas mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) are the averages 
of daily high and low water marks at a location. Similarly, mean higher high water (MHHW) and 
mean lower low water (MLLW) are the averages of daily higher high and lower low waters 
recorded at a given location. Mean tide level (MTL) is the average of MHW and MLW, while 
4
Search pdf files for text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert pdf to searchable text; search pdf files for text
Search pdf files for text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf find text; how to select text in a pdf
mean diurnal tide level (MDTL) is the average of MHHW and MLLW. The tidal datum chosen 
for reference depends on the application of the data.  
Tidal datums vary based on global tidal characteristics and local hydrodynamic influences. The 
tides are controlled primarily by the gravitational influences and interactions of the sun and 
moon on the rotating Earth. Local and regional aspects—such as the coastline, basin shape, 
latitude, subsidence, isostatic rebound, and other hydrodynamic characteristics—also have a 
strong influence on the resulting tidal datum. Typically, tidal datums are modeled rather than 
based on real-time tidal observations. These datums are computed to be representative of a given 
tidal epoch (18.6 years), which is approximately the amount of time required for the major 
astronomical influences to complete one cycle. Tidal models can be used to convert among 
datum references. 
The tidal datum chosen for a reference usually depends on the application of the data. For 
instance, hydrographic data used to generate navigational charts is most often referenced to 
MLLW to portray navigational obstacles most effectively, whereas data used for modeling 
tsunami inundation is most often referenced to MHW in order to represent the worst-case 
scenario during a tsunami event. 
Ellipsoidal Datums 
Ellipsoidal datums, also known as three-dimensional (3-D) datums, are primarily used for 
horizontal reference and can also be used as a vertical reference. Each datum includes an origin 
for the coordinate system (such as Earth mass-center), an orientation, and a mathematical model 
for the size and shape of the Earth. This model is called an ellipsoid, and it is a simple geometric 
representation of the surface of the Earth that serves as a consistent reference surface—it is not, 
however, an accurate representation of the Earth’s surface. One example of an application that 
benefits from ellipsoid reference is collecting Global Positioning System (GPS) reference 
locations in the field. Since satellites are used for positioning with GPS and for calculation of the 
mathematical model (the ellipsoid), this reference is well suited for the application. 
The most commonly used ellipsoid in the world is the Geodetic Reference System 1980 
(GRS80), which was adopted by the International Association of Geodesy in 1979. This ellipsoid 
is based on satellite tracking; therefore, it is consistent with the reference systems used by the 
various Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) —such as the World Geodetic System 1984 
(WGS84) reference system used with the U.S. GPS. The Russian GLONASS and European 
Union Galileo also use similar systems. In North America, the North American Datum of 1983 
(NAD83), which has been updated from the North American Datum of 1927 (NAD27), is the 
official horizontal reference system for the U.S. and Canada. Since the first publication of 
NAD83 coordinates in 1986, the system has been improved with the development of GPS High 
Accuracy Reference Networks (HARN) and a system of Continuously Operating Reference 
Stations (CORS), which increased the precision associated with representing the surface. NAD83 
was affirmed as the official civilian horizontal datum for the U.S. by a notice in the Federal 
Register on June 14, 1989, by the Federal Geodetic Control Committee (FGCC), superseding 
NAD27. 
5
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
be easily edited), is less searchable for search engines are able to perform high fidelity PDF to HTML Converted HTML files preserve all the contents of source
pdf searchable text converter; pdf text search tool
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
DotNetNuke), SharePoint. All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET
how to select text in pdf and copy; how to select text in pdf reader
In February 2007, the NOAA National Geodetic Survey (NGS) completed a readjustment of 
more than 60,000 GPS stations to create a consistent set of NAD83 values for the U.S., 
referenced as NAD83 (NSRS 2007). In other areas of the world, datums such as the European 
Terrestrial Reference System 1989 (ETRS89) and the Japanese Geodetic Datum 2000 (JGD00) 
are used. Heights defined in these datums are referred to as ellipsoid heights. Ellipsoid heights 
can differ from orthometric heights (as defined by NAVD88) by tens of meters. 
DATUM CONVERSION 
The first critical step for preparing multiple data sets for a topobathy DEM is to establish a 
common horizontal and vertical reference for the data sets. A common reference reduces error in 
the final DEM by resolving any reference mismatches that occur between data sets. This is 
particularly important for applications requiring both a high spatial resolution and vertical 
accuracy. A common reference allows for combination and comparison of multiple data sets by 
removing one source of systematic bias. 
When converting data sets to a common reference, the major issue is the lack of information on 
the relationship between datums. Orthometric and ellipsoidal heights are referenced to modeled 
surfaces (gravitational or mathematical) that are static, whereas tidal datums vary spatially and 
temporally. Topography is generally referenced to one or both static references. Orthometric 
reference is a static land-based reference system with many highly accurate benchmark reference 
stations, and ellipsoidal reference is a static satellite-positioning based reference. While 
individual geoids and ellipsoids are static, they can be updated to better represent the relationship 
between the Earth’s surface and the static surface. Tidal datums are relative references that vary 
spatially along a coastline and temporally with each new National Tidal Datum Epoch. The 
accuracy of a tidal datum reference is limited by the length of time observations have been 
collected; the longer a tidal benchmark has been recording, the more accurate the tidal datum 
determination will be. Bathymetry is generally collected with reference to a tidal datum, since 
many applications of these data sets are relevant to tidal conditions (such as navigation).  
Trying to combine or compare data sets referenced to a combination of relative and static 
references can be problematic, and this is one of the major hurdles in creating an integrated or 
seamless topobathy DEM. The NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) establishes the 
relationship between tidal and orthometric datums by surveying NGS benchmarks (which 
determine orthometric height) at NOS tide gauge stations (which determine local tide datums). 
To determine the spatial variability in the relationship between orthometric and tidal datums, it is 
essential to understand how the two relate. Generation of highly accurate hydrodynamic models 
for computing tidal datums can be costly; therefore, in many cases, alternative methods have 
been developed. Information about these methods—including necessary data resources and 
limitations—is contained in the following section. 
The error introduced into a DEM surface because of the lack of a common reference can be 
substantial; however, the error is not constant due to the spatial variability of the difference 
between reference surfaces. Because each datum is an independent surface, rather than an offset 
surface, the distance between surfaces varies. NOS tidal benchmarks in the continental U.S. have 
a known height with reference to NAVD88. This height, in conjunction with observed MSL 
measurements, can be used to approximate the difference between datums. Table 1 shows 
6
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
how to make a pdf file text searchable; pdf text select tool
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF.
select text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf
selected tidal benchmarks to illustrate the regional variation in the difference between MSL and 
NAVD88. 
MSL 
NAVD88 
Difference 
NOS Benchmark 
Station Location 
Benchmark 
Number 
feet 
meters 
feet 
meters  feet 
meters 
Portland, ME 
8418150
13.49
4.113
13.81
4.208  0.32 
0.095
St. Simons Island, GA 
8677344
5.27
1.606
5.93
1.806  0.66 
0.200
Key West, FL 
8724580
5.45
1.662
6.32
1.928  0.87 
0.266
Grand Isle, LA 
8761724
6.39
1.947
5.31
1.617  -1.08 
-0.330
San Diego, CA 
9410170
6.73
2.052
4.22
1.287  -2.51 
-0.765
Charleston, OR 
9432780
7.84
2.390
4.26
1.298  -3.58 
-1.092
Table 1: Difference between Mean Sea Level (MSL) and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88) 
for selected National Ocean Service (NOS) tidal benchmark stations. Accessed from www.co-
ops.nos.noaa.gov/station_retrieve.shtml?type=Tide+Data on February 26, 2007. 
DATUM CONVERSION TECHNIQUES 
Because there is no easy way to establish a common datum reference among tidal, ellipsoidal, 
and orthometric datums, methods have evolved to approximate the relationships between and 
among datums. Each method uses similar theory, but the resource requirements, complexity, 
accuracy, and sources of error are variable.  
This section will focus mainly on the considerations when transforming data sets between tidal 
and orthometric datums. This is because the conversion between ellipsoidal and orthometric 
reference is a transformation between static reference surfaces, making this relationship 
relatively straightforward to model. This conversion relies on a grid of difference between the 
geoid model and the ellipsoid model to execute this transformation. The more difficult 
relationship to model is between tidal and orthometric datums. 
In the following sections, four common methods of datum conversion are discussed. Significant 
constraints of each of these methods include the following: 
· Availability of high-quality input data for the hydrodynamic and geoid models – 
including bathymetry, shoreline, benchmark data, tidal observations, and gravitational 
measurements.  
· Accuracy of geodetic and tidal benchmark information – The location of benchmarks 
may change over time or because of a major event, making the reference inaccurate. The 
accuracy of the relationship between geodetic and tidal benchmarks can be seen as a 
limiting factor in each of these methods. 
· Density of tidal benchmarks – The relationship between NAVD88 and MSL is only 
known at the benchmark; therefore, interpolation between benchmarks is necessary to 
approximate the relationship between benchmarks. Having closely spaced benchmarks 
allows greater accuracy in estimating this relationship.  
7
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
File: Merge, Append PDF Files. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Merge and Append PDF. VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One.
convert pdf to searchable text online; how to search a pdf document for text
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image
find text in pdf files; how to search pdf files for text
VDatum: Vertical Datum Transformation Software 
Overview 
VDatum is a desktop software tool designed to convert among vertical datums with a high 
degree of accuracy. VDatum can transform a data set among 28 different reference datums in 
three major classes: orthometric, ellipsoidal, and tidal. This software uses a geoid model, a 
hydrodynamic model, and NOS tidal benchmarks to establish relationships among datums. 
VDatum is developed jointly by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 
Office of Coast Survey and National Geodetic Survey. Current availability is limited; however, if 
it is available for your area of interest, it can be downloaded at no cost from the following 
website, nauticalcharts.noaa.gov/csdl/vdatum.htm
Methodology 
VDatum uses two main pieces of information to convert between tidal and orthometric datums: a 
detailed hydrodynamic model of tides and a topography of the sea surface. The hydrodynamic 
model is used to determine the spatial variability of tidal datums within a region. It is created by 
simulation of the tidal response to sun and planetary influences, bathymetry, and local 
characteristics in an area to make grids that relate tidal datums to a local MSL. This tidal datum 
information is combined with tide gauge information to develop the topography of the sea 
surface, which can be used to describe the relationship between local MSL and NAVD88. These 
pieces of information provide the tools for translation between orthometric and tidal datums. 
Using the hydrodynamic model of a coastal region, data such as bathymetry, collected with 
reference to a tidal datum, such as MLLW, can be converted to local MSL. The topography of 
the sea surface can then be used to relate local MSL to an orthometric datum. If further 
conversion to an ellipsoidal datum is required at this point, a grid of difference between the geoid 
model and ellipsoid model is used to convert the data set.  
Detailed methodology and documentation for use of VDatum can be found in NOS (2007, in 
preparation) and Milbert (2002). 
Limitations and Error 
VDatum uses the most accurate datum conversions available. However, generating the 
hydrodynamic models—on which the tidal datum conversions rely—is a time- and resource-
intensive process. For this reason, VDatum conversions involving tidal datums are currently 
available only for select areas of the U.S. coastline. There is significant interest in developing 
VDatum for the entire U.S. coastline and associated coastal margins. One advantage to 
nationwide VDatum coverage is the availability of a uniform, accurate, and convenient 
mechanism for datum conversion. If this were the case, VDatum would likely be uniformly 
preferred over many other datum conversion techniques, regardless of whether the application 
required the most rigorous method of conversion. 
Error from the datum conversion process stems from the methods for creation of the 
hydrodynamic model and the topography of the sea surface, but the total error of the process 
includes error from the constraints mentioned in the introduction. In general, this method has the 
least error when applied to areas of coastline with a well-defined geoid and steeply-sloping 
coastal topography. The hydrodynamic model is corrected to match datums computed from 
8
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Images. File and Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF.
pdf make text searchable; select text in pdf reader
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
HTML webpage will have original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; pdf find and replace text
observations, and the VDatum team is currently assessing what errors may be present in the 
corrected model results between observation locations. The computation of the topography of the 
sea surface is also being analyzed for potential introduction of errors. Transformations that 
require conversion across several datums (such as MLLW to NAVD88 to NAD83) may 
compound errors, and that must be taken into account when evaluating the total error. The 
VDatum team is working to quantify all conversion-associated errors, and make that information 
available as metadata with the software tool. Ultimately, the team’s goal is to have the expected 
error for the VDatum conversions reported for each transformation as total propagated error. 
Currently there is no established estimate of error for this method, but VDatum is widely 
accepted as the transformation method with the least error. 
Harmonic Constant Datum Method  
Overview 
The Harmonic Constant Datum (HCD) method estimates tidal datums by relying on tidal 
constituents (or harmonics) to approximate the tidal curve. This process is particularly useful in 
areas where a detailed hydrodynamic model has not been created or where there are few long-
term tide stations. This method requires development of a hydrodynamic model based on tidal 
constituents, and conversion is accomplished using a geoid model and NOS benchmark data. The 
hydrodynamic model constructed for the HDC method is similar to the hydrodynamic model 
constructed for VDatum, but it is an approximation of tidal datums and is less detailed than the 
VDatum hydrodynamic model. The HCD method was developed at the NOAA Center for 
Tsunami Research. 
Methodology 
The HCD method uses the signatures of major tidal influences to create a generalized 
hydrodynamic model. The main tidal influences are the moon, sun, and rotation of the Earth. The 
major model components (called harmonic constants) represent these influences. The HCD 
method uses a computation of the average tidal curve, rather than the actual or interpolated tidal 
curve, to translate between tidal datums. Using the harmonic constants, modelers can estimate 
tidal datums relative to MSL. This method is used only to compute tidal datums, but NOS tide 
gauge data can be used to translate between MSL and orthometric datums, as described in the 
VDatum section. Also similar to VDatum, the orthometric to ellipsoid conversion would use a 
grid of difference between the geoid and ellipsoid models. Detailed information on the use of the 
HCD method can be found in Mofjeld and others (2004) and Venturato (2005). In addition, the 
theory behind the methodology can be found in Harris (1894) and Coast and Geodetic Survey 
(1952). 
Limitations and Error 
This technique is especially useful in areas where tide records are available at only a few 
scattered primary tide stations. The HCD technique can help bridge the gap by providing 
modeled tidal heights. Researchers have compared tidal heights modeled using the HCD method 
to actual tidal heights in order to quantify error. In one case in the Puget Sound, modeled heights 
were generally less than the observed tidal heights across 48 tide stations. The greatest difference 
in MSL between modeled and observed tide heights for this instance was 12.8 centimeters. 
However, the large majority of differences were less than 5 centimeters. This error measurement 
9
only takes into account the error caused by the tidal modeling process, not error from the 
conversion using benchmarks. For additional information on error using this method, see table 
5.4 in Mofjeld and others (2002). 
The tidal regime is an important consideration when using the HCD method. This methodology 
is designed to work for semidiurnal tides (two high and two low tides of approximately equal 
amplitude per day), diurnal tides (one high and one low tide per day), and areas of mixed 
semidiurnal and diurnal tidal regimes. In areas with multiple types of tides, three approaches can 
be used to effectively represent tidal datum changes across a region, but there are some trade-
offs. The approaches are as follows: (1) use separate algorithms for each area, which results in a 
discontinuity at the interface of the regions, (2) apply the mixed tidal algorithm for an entire 
region, which introduces some error, or (3) use a cubic polynomial that consistently defines the 
transition area. 
Interpolation 
Overview 
When tidal benchmarks are located in the study area, the interpolation method can be used to 
convert data sets between tidal and geoidal/ellipsoidal datums. A tidal benchmark—which often 
combines tidal observations with corresponding information on the gauge’s relationship to the 
geoid—can be used to represent tidal datums for the benchmark location. When multiple tidal 
benchmarks are available, the tidal surface can be created by interpolating the tidal surface 
between reference stations. The interpolation method can approximate the relationship between 
tidal datums and orthometric datums using one, few, or many benchmarks. Tidal benchmark 
data, including orthometric height, are readily available from the National Water Level Program 
and the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON), 
http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/nwlon.html
Methodology 
To use this method, at least one tidal benchmark must be in the region of interest. The 
benchmark(s) must have a known orthometric height and known tidal datums, such as MSL, 
MHW, and MLLW. The duration of observation at these tide gauge sites is critical to accurate 
determination of tidal datums. Generally, the longer an NOS tide gauge is in operation, the more 
precise the model of the tidal datum will be. Primary stations in the NWLON are often 
continuously observed for at least 19 years. In some cases where more detailed tidal information 
is necessary between reference stations, short-term reference stations (those operating for a year 
or more) can be used to assist in interpolation. If multiple tidal benchmarks are available, tidal 
datums relative to MSL can be estimated using tidal observation data from tide gauges and 
interpolating between benchmarks. If only one benchmark exists in the region of interest, the 
tidal observations at that gauge can be applied across the region to estimate the tidal datums. The 
orthometric heights of the benchmarks are used to relate MSL to orthometric datums. Using the 
same method as in VDatum and the HDC method, the grid of difference between the geoid 
model and ellipsoid model is used to convert to ellipsoidal reference.  
10
Limitations and Error 
The more benchmarks available to represent the tidal datums, the more accurate this method is at 
representing the tidal surface and relating it to other datums. This method relies on interpolation 
and known information at one or more points to represent the tidal surface across a region. If one 
point is used, the difference between datums at one point is extrapolated to cover an extended 
area. If multiple points are available, interpolation is necessary to infer location of datums 
between reference stations. Neither of these methods precisely represents the differences in tidal 
datums across a region; however, this approximation is useful when minimal information is 
available. This methodology is most effective in an area with uniform shoreline, multiple 
benchmarks, consistent bathymetric characteristics, little tidal variation, and a small tidal range. 
Error associated with this method is highly individualized to the area the method is applied. The 
accuracy of this method reflects both the characteristics of the region and number of benchmarks 
used. This method will produce a transformation acceptable for some applications, but it is 
possible that it may not be sufficient for the highest resolution applications, such as shoreline 
delineation. 
No Conversion to a Uniform Datum 
Overview 
Another option to consider is to simply not covert to a uniform datum; however, when a common 
reference is not established for multiple data sets, vertical accuracy of the elevation model is 
limited. A simple reason for not converting datums could be that no conversion options are 
available. If VDatum is not available, no HCD model has been developed, no benchmarks are in 
the study region, and no resources are available for data enhancement, then there are no options 
for establishing a common vertical datum.  
In some cases, conversion methods are available but are not used because the DEM being created 
has a resolution coarse enough that differences caused by datum shifts do not significantly 
impact the quality of the resulting data set. This occurs when the variability within a grid cell of 
coarse resolution is larger than the adjustment between datums. Neglecting datum transformation 
is appropriate when the datum correction is well within the noise level of the data. For instance, 
the Coastal Relief Model is a nationwide data set that does not take into account vertical 
reference before generating the 3 arc-second (90 meter) topobathy grid. However, just because it 
doesn’t take into account datum reference, doesn’t mean it lacks utility. At this scale, the 
topobathy grid is useful for applications such as regional visualization of the coastal zone and 
watershed-scale analyses. In this case, the error from neglecting the vertical and horizontal 
reference is dwarfed by the error inherent in lower resolution grids. This error stems from 
selecting one elevation to represent a large area within a grid cell. More information about the 
Coastal Relief Model can be found at the following location, 
www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/coastal/coastal.html
Methodology 
No relationship between datums is established; therefore, no datum conversion occurs. In this 
case, the researcher assumes that the datums are approximately equivalent.  
11
Limitations and Error 
This method limits the quality of a high-resolution DEM developed from these data sets. Without 
creating a common format, any high-resolution grid or surface created from these data sets will 
have substantial error. The amount of error introduced by not establishing a common datum 
reference is highly dependent on the area in which the grid is being generated and the size of the 
grid cell. Neglecting to correct for datum differences can cause discontinuity in heights within an 
elevation model, disconnected shoreline segments, and error in calculation of erosion rates and 
setback lines. 
DATA INTEGRATION 
Once data sets are referenced to a common vertical and horizontal datum, the next step in 
producing a high-quality topobathy DEM is data integration. Ideally, data sets would line up 
perfectly after the data sets were converted to a uniform reference, but that is rarely the case. 
Differences in data sets may be caused by different collection sensors, different seasons for data 
collection, or collecting data sets before or after a large event where surface change occurs. Data 
integration is the process of combining two or more data sets into a single, continuous surface. 
Several decisions must be made about how data sets are manipulated, and each decision affects 
the characteristics of the resulting DEM. Some of these decisions involve how to prepare raw 
point data, what type of grid is necessary, and what grid characteristics fit the application. 
Multiple techniques exist for each decision, and how they impact the final DEM will be 
addressed in the following section.  
Preparation of Raw Points 
Often DEM generation begins with preparation of raw point data. If raw points are used from 
multiple data sets, it is necessary to decide which points from each data set will be used.  
For each data set, the decision must be made to include all points or use a subset of points to 
represent the surface. All points can be used to represent a surface for certain applications, but 
often a specific surface, such as bare-earth, is required and can be specified in some data sets. 
Some newer data collections, such as lidar with LAS classification, include elevation returns 
classified to represent features such as “water,” “vegetation,” “building,” and “ground.” A bare-
earth surface can be created using only the points from the “ground” classification, and this data 
subset may represent the surface more accurately for certain applications. Alternately, it may be 
important to the application to keep the vegetation and buildings in the DEM, in which case, all 
points or key classified categories of points would be used. 
In cases where there is an overlap of data sets, one data set may supersede another. For example, 
giving preference to a more recent collection or a collection with a more advanced sensor may 
represent the surface more accurately than a combination of points from both data sets. If data 
sets are of approximately equal quality and accuracy, all points may be used or data sets may be 
“feathered,” which means that alternating strips of data from each data set are woven together at 
the interface of data sets. Generally, new data should replace old data (where possible) to 
represent the surface using the most recent measurements and most accurate technology. 
The result of preparing raw point data sets often leaves a surface of points that has dense 
elevation measurements in some areas and sparse elevation measurements in others. It will likely 
12
still have data mismatches, and there may be gaps where no data exist. Additionally, the size of 
the file will often limit its utility for an application. Because of these characteristics, often a grid 
is necessary to create a useful DEM to represent the topobathy surface. 
Grid Design 
Designing the grid to suit a particular application requires decisions about structure, cell size, and 
point selection mechanism. A gridding method may be chosen to reduce the size of the DEM file 
or processing time, to accommodate areas with lower-resolution data or sparse data sets, or to 
generally represent the surface from a dense data set when a highly detailed surface is not 
required for the application.  
The structure of the grid, either structured or unstructured, depends on the requirements of the 
application. A structured grid has a uniform grid cell shape—a rectangle—with elevation values 
at each of the cell’s four nodes or at the center of the cell. It does not require a uniform cell size, 
but it typically does not have an extremely broad range of cell sizes. An unstructured grid (such 
as a Triangulated Irregular Network) has grid cells with a triangular shape so that elevation 
values are at each of the three nodes. Cell size can be highly variable in an unstructured grid, and 
therefore it can show more detail in areas of a DEM where elevation change may be more 
meaningful, such as at the shoreline, and less detail in areas of uniform elevation. Also, 
unstructured grids are able to accommodate input data with variable resolutions. If the 
requirements for a DEM vary spatially, an unstructured grid could be advantageous. Selection of 
grid type also depends on the requirements of the model or software application that will be 
using the DEM. For instance, the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model and the Sea, Lake, 
and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model both simulate processes such as tides and 
storm surge. ADCIRC requires an unstructured grid input, whereas SLOSH requires a structured 
grid input. 
The grid cell size chosen for a DEM depends on the density of available elevation data and 
model limitations in terms of processing time and stability. The ultimate goal of a grid is to be 
representative of the elevation surface; therefore, the grid size should be small enough to 
adequately represent the surface for a specific application. In addition, the cell should be small 
enough that the area covered by the cell is reasonably represented by one elevation value and that 
the resulting DEM captures the details of the relief. The grid cell should also be large enough so 
that the point data can support the grid size and the density of data points within each grid cell is 
representative of the elevation surface. Even in areas of sparse elevation measurements, the grid 
cell has to contain adequate measurements to represent the surface. An additional consideration 
when selecting grid size is ensuring the DEM will be cost- and time-effective to build and run in 
the selected model. Ideally, there is range among these considerations to satisfy requirements. 
The point selection technique chosen to determine an elevation value for a grid cell or node is 
critical to the utility of the resulting grid. With the bounds of the cell delineating the grid area, all 
points inside must be represented using some mathematical function. For areas where data 
density is high, gridding allows the choice of (1) the largest value in the grid area (maximum), 
(2) the smallest value in the grid area (minimum), or (3) the average of the elevation values 
within the grid cell (average). Where data density is low, multiple grid interpolation methods are 
available, including inverse distance weighting (IDW), nearest neighbor, or more complex 
13
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested