how to open pdf file using itextsharp in c# : Can't select text in pdf file SDK application service wpf html asp.net dnn Unit27SpreadsheetModelling2-part1618

21
Unit 27 Spreadsheet modelling
2.4 Entering and editing data
Absolute and relative cell referencing
We’ve already introduced the concept of relative cell referencing. 
This is the way cell addresses in formulae change when you copy 
them. However, there are some situations when you don’t want the 
cell address in a formula to change when you copy it. The following 
example demonstrates why.
We’ll use the Games Store spreadsheet again, but for simplicity we’ll 
leave out the If function formulae. This time we want to have a sale and 
reduce all the prices by between 5 and 15 per cent. But we want to do 
a bit of ‘What if...?’ experimentation to see how different percentages 
will affect the total value of our stock. Figure 27.18 shows the modified 
version of the spreadsheet with an example percentage reduction 
already entered in cell B16.
Did you know?
To enter a value as a percentage, 
simply type the % sign after the 
number.
We need to enter a formula in E4 to reduce the existing price in B4 by 
the percentage in B16. First we multiply these two values together to 
get 10 per cent of the current price (£3.15). Then we need to subtract 
that from the current price to get the sale price. The formula we need is:
=B4–B4*B16
Figure 27.18: Games Store sale spreadsheet
Can't select text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf searchable text converter; select text in pdf reader
Can't select text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
convert pdf to searchable text online; how to select all text in pdf
22
BTEC’s own resources
We don’t need brackets here, as the multiplication is done first anyway. 
If we now copy this formula down the rest of the column we find that a 
problem occurs, as shown in Figure 27.19.
Figure 27.19: Copying the formula
Figure 27.20: An absolute reference
The 10 per cent reduction has worked correctly on the first price, but 
none of the other prices have been reduced. If we look at the formula 
in E5 we can see why (look in the formula bar in Figure 27.19). Relative 
referencing has changed the original B4 in the formula to B5 – this is 
correct as the value in B5 is the price of the next game. But it has also 
changed B16, the cell with the percentage reduction, to B17, which 
contains nothing. We don’t want that part of the address to change 
when we copy the formula – we want it to stay fixed as B16. Fixing a cell 
address so that it does not change is called absolute referencing.
Did you know?
Pressing the F4 key (function key on 
the top of your keyboard) after you 
have entered a cell address will insert 
the $ sign in front of the column 
letter and row number for you.
C# PDF copy, paste image Library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in
PDFPage page1 = (PDFPage)doc.GetPage(pageIndex); // Select image at Description: Extract all images in a PDF document. doc, Target document object, Can't be null.
search a pdf file for text; search pdf files for text programmatically
C# Image: How to Deploy .NET Imaging SDK in Visual C# Applications
dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll; In build tab, select proper platform target testing web viewer control, I can't upload document
convert pdf to searchable text; pdf editor with search and replace text
23
Unit 27 Spreadsheet modelling
To make that part of the formula  
use absolute referencing, we need 
to return to the formula in E4 and 
edit it in the formula bar. Click in 
front of B16 then enter a dollar ($) 
sign in front of the B and another $ 
sign in front of the 16. It should now 
read $B$16, as shown in  
Figure 27.20.
Now, if you copy this formula down 
through the column, the B4 part of 
the formula will change (because of 
relative referencing) but the B16 part 
will not change (because of absolute 
referencing). This new version of the 
formula will display reduced prices 
for all the games, as shown in  
Figure 27.21.
If you wanted to fix only the row or 
the column address, instead of both, 
you can do this by inserting the $ 
sign in front of the column letter or 
row number only.
Figure 27.21: Reduced prices for all games
To complete the spreadsheet, add a formula in column F to calculate 
the value of the games with their reduced prices (quantity multiplied 
by sale price). Then use the AutoSum button to provide a new total 
value of the stock in cell F14.
•  What is the maximum percentage sale reduction that can be 
given while keeping the total value of the stock above £2000?
Activity: Using absolute 
referencing
Autofilling cells
Spreadsheet software contains lots of features to make creating  
large spreadsheets easy; one of those features is AutoFill. Many 
budget spreadsheets have the months across the top of the columns 
(like the car cost calculator we created on pages 10–12). Instead of 
having to type each month, you can just type the first month. (It doesn’t 
have to be January – you can start with any month – and you can use 
the abbreviated version, such as Jan, if you wish.) Then use the cell 
pointer copy box (see page 8) to copy the cell across as many cells as 
you need. AutoFill will enter the month names for you, as shown in  
Figure 27.22.
24
BTEC’s own resources
Figure 27.22: Using AutoFill to complete month names
You can use AutoFill to enter the days of the week in the same way – either 
the full names (e.g. Monday) or the abbreviated versions (e.g. Mon). You 
can also enter a date (e.g. 04/07/2011) and AutoFill will fill in subsequent 
dates for as many days as you wish.
AutoFill can also complete a sequence of numbers or dates if you show it 
what sequence you want. For example, to number cells sequentially, just 
type 1 in the first cell you want to number, then 2 in the next one. Then 
select these two cells by dragging across them 
with the white-cross mouse shape, click and drag 
on the copy box and keep dragging for however 
many cells you want to number. AutoFill will fill in 
the numbers for you.
Another example is if you want a series of cells 
to show the dates on each Monday for several 
weeks. Just enter the first two dates – for example 
22 March 2010 is a Monday, and the following 
Monday is 29 March 2010 – in two cells that are 
next to each other. Select these cells and then use 
the copy box to list as many Monday dates as you 
require (see Figure 27.23). This can make creating 
a timetable or schedule easy, as you don’t need to 
look up each date.
2.5 Automations
Linking spreadsheets
One of the benefits of having multiple worksheets in one spreadsheet is that 
you can link information between the worksheets. You can see the benefits 
of this by looking at some examples. There are two ways to create links:
• enter links between worksheets as formulae
• use Paste Link.
Figure 27.23: Using AutoFill to enter dates
25
Unit 27 Spreadsheet modelling
How to... Link spreadsheets using manual links
Figure 27.24: The Games shops sales spreadsheet
Figure 27.25: Total Sales worksheet 
Figure 27.26: Linking the worksheets
Imagine you have two computer games shops – one in Luton and 
one in Watford. You keep a record of each shop’s sales on two 
worksheets in the same spreadsheet. The spreadsheet is shown in 
Figure 27.24, with the Luton shop worksheet currently displayed. 
The worksheet for the Watford shop is set up in exactly the same 
way – only the sales figures are different.
The worksheets have been given names (look at the tabs at 
the bottom of the worksheets), rather than just Sheet1, Sheet2, 
etc. (You can do this by double-clicking on the sheet name and 
typing in the name you want.)
Now we are going to create a third worksheet, called Total 
Sales, which will show the combined total sales from both the 
Luton and Watford shops. The basic layout of this worksheet is 
shown in Figure 27.25.
To copy the values from the other worksheets:
•  First click in cell B4, which is where the January total from 
the Luton shop will go.
•  Type an equals sign to start a formula.
•  Now click on the Luton shop worksheet name to swap to 
that worksheet.
•  Click in B7 on the Luton shop worksheet (which contains the 
January total). Notice that, on the formula bar, the address 
of that cell in that worksheet (‘Luton shop’!B7) has been 
entered. (The worksheet name is in single quotes followed 
by an exclamation mark and the cell name. This is the 
format of a cell address that contains a worksheet name.) 
(See Figure 27.26.)
•  Now press Enter to complete the formula.
•  You will now be returned to the Total Sales worksheet, with 
the value from the Luton shop worksheet displayed. This 
value is linked with the Luton shop worksheet – if a change 
is made to that value on the Luton shop worksheet, it will 
change here too.
•  Now copy the formula that you created for the Luton Shop 
January sales total across to February and March (cells C4 
and D4). Relative addressing works in just the same way 
as it does with cells that are on the same worksheet – the 
formula adjusts the cell addresses to pick up the correct 
monthly totals.
•  Insert the totals for the Watford shop in the same way – 
create a formula that links with the Watford shop worksheet 
for January then copy the formula across for February and 
March. The grand totals can be completed using a simple 
formula (e.g. =B4+B5 for January, and so on).
•  The completed sheet should look like Figure 27.27.
Figure 27.27: The completed Total Sales sheet
26
BTEC’s own resources
How to… Link spreadsheets using Paste Links
Paste Link provides an alternative method for creating links between 
worksheets.
•  Click on the cell containing the formula you want to copy (e.g. B7 in 
the Luton worksheet) and choose Edit then Copy (or click the copy 
icon in the Ribbon).
•  Now go to the cell where you want the formula to be copied into 
(e.g. B4 in the Total Sales worksheet) and choose Edit then Paste 
Special. This will display the Paste Special dialog box.
•  Click the Paste Link button and the link formula will be inserted.
However, note that the cell references have been made absolute, so 
the formulae cannot be copied as described above. So although Paste 
Link provides an easy way to create links between worksheets, in this 
example it would be easier to create the linking formulae manually.
Macros
Macros allow regularly used functions to be automated. A task that might 
take several keystrokes or menu selections can be simplified by creating 
a macro that carries out the task with a single mouse click. The subject of 
macros is covered in Unit 9: Customising software, pages 164–169.
2.6 Refining spreadsheet models
Improving efficiency
Excel
®
provides many shortcut key combinations to make it easy to 
move around large or multiple worksheets. Some of the more useful 
ones are listed in Table 27.4.
Table 27.4: Commonly used shortcut keys
Shortcut key
Effect
For moving around a worksheet
Ctrl + End
Moves cell pointer to the last used cell in a 
worksheet (bottom-right cell)
Ctrl + Home
Moves cell pointer to cell A1
Home
Moves cell pointer to the beginning (i.e. 
column A) of current row
Page Down
Moves one screen down
Page Up
Moves one screen up
Selecting cells
Ctrl + A
Selects the current data region
Ctrl
Allows you to select non-adjacent areas (i.e. 
areas that are not next to each other)
Data region – an area of cells that 
contains something and is surrounded 
by empty cells or the edge of the 
worksheet.
Key term
27
Unit 27 Spreadsheet modelling
Moving between worksheets
Ctrl + Page Up
Move to next worksheet
Ctrl + Page Down
Move to previous worksheet
Formatting
Ctrl + Shift + $
Applies currency format
Ctrl + Shift + %
Applies percentage format
There are many more shortcut keys, but it can be difficult to remember 
them all unless you use them often. You can find out about them all by 
searching the Help menu in Excel
®
.
2.7 Combining information
There are some situations when you will want to select information 
created in Excel
®
and insert it into another software package, such as a 
Word
®
document. For example, you may wish to do this if you need to 
produce a financial report.
Simple copy and paste
The simplest way to insert data into a Word
®
document is to copy the 
required cells from Excel
®
and paste the data into Word
®
. Once pasted 
into a Word
®
document, worksheet cells will become a Word
®
table and 
can be edited in the normal way. An example is shown in Figure 27.28, 
but as you can see, the columns of the table need widening to display 
the data on one line.
Cells pasted in this way are no longer connected with the original 
spreadsheet.
Table 27.4: Contd.
Figure 27.28: Excel
®
spreadsheet 
cells pasted into a Word
®
document
28
BTEC’s own resources
Retaining a link to the original data
It’s also possible for the pasted cells in the Word
®
document to remain 
linked with the original spreadsheet, so that changes made in the 
spreadsheet will be reflected in the pasted cells in the Word
®
document.
How to… Save a spreadsheet file
Save a file in Excel
®
by going to the Office menu and choosing Save. To 
save an existing file with a different name, choose Save As. Alternatively, 
you can use the Save button in the Quick Access toolbar.
If the spreadsheet has not been previously saved, or you choose Save 
As, you will see the Save As dialog box. You will be offered a default file 
name such as Book1.xls.
If you want a different format for your spreadsheet, you can select the 
format you want from the drop-down list from the Save as type box on 
the Save As dialog box.
2.8 File handling
You must, of course, save the spreadsheet file you produce. Normally 
you will save the spreadsheet as an Excel
®
file, but in some situations 
you may want to export the file in an alternative format, for example to 
use the spreadsheet in a database or web page.
When you are creating lots of spreadsheets and other files, it’s a good 
idea to create a folder structure to keep related files together.
Did you know?
It’s not a good idea to use the default 
name such as Book1, as it tells you 
very little about what the spreadsheet 
contains. It is much better to think of 
a more descriptive name that gives 
some clue to the contents of the 
spreadsheet. For example, you might 
call a monthly budget spreadsheet 
Budget for Jan 11.
How to… Retain a link to the original data
Copy the cells from Excel
®
and switch to the Word
®
document.
•  Select the Home tab in the ribbon and click the 
arrow under the Paste icon.
•  From the menu that appears choose Paste Special. 
This will display the Paste Special dialog box (see 
Figure 27.29). Click the Paste Link button.
•  Select the document type Microsoft Office 
Excel Worksheet Object from the list box then 
click OK. 
•  The cells will be inserted in the Word
®
document 
as before, but not as a Word
®
table. Rather, the 
cells behave as a graphic image.
•  To edit the cells, double click on them and the 
original spreadsheet will open up in Excel
®
but 
inside Word
®
.
Figure 27.29: The Paste Special dialog box
29
Unit 27 Spreadsheet modelling
2.9 Presenting data
So far we’ve kept our spreadsheets fairly plain, but there are many 
options that allow us to format the data in a spreadsheet, thereby 
improving the way it is presented.
Data types
There are several different ways that numbers can be formatted  
in Excel
®
:
• Default number format. This is the format you get when you enter 
plain numbers.
• Comma format. This numeric format will add two digits after the 
decimal point and a comma after the thousands. There is a button 
on the Home tab to choose this format.
• Currency. If you enter a number with a currency symbol (£ in the UK) 
before it, the currency format will automatically be applied. There is 
also a button in the Home tab to apply it.
• Percentage. If you enter a number followed by a % sign, the 
percentage format will be applied. There is also a button in the 
Home tab to apply it.
• Date. If you enter a number in a date format (such as 7/5/10 or 
7-May-10), the date format will be applied.
Figure 27.30 shows the same number (1234) formatted in different ways 
using the standard Home tab buttons. Note that the percentage format 
button multiplies a number by 100, so if you want, for example, 50% to 
be displayed, then you must enter 0.5.
Figure 27.30: The number formats
30
BTEC’s own resources
Date format is automatically set in a cell if you enter something that 
Excel
®
recognises as a date, such as 5/2/06 or 5-Feb-06.
Deleting data
If you delete the contents of a cell or cells that have been formatted (by 
selecting the cells with the current cell pointer and pressing Delete), you 
will delete what is in the cell but you will not remove the formatting. This 
can have some confusing results. For example, if you enter a date in a 
cell, the cell will automatically be formatted as a date. If you then delete 
the date but at some time later enter a simple number in the same 
cell, the number will be displayed as a date. If this happens, you can 
change the formatting using one of the format buttons in the toolbar. 
Alternatively, when you delete the date initially, use the Clear icon (a 
pencil eraser) on the Home tab and choose Clear all from the drop-
down menu; this will remove both the contents and the formatting.
Increase and Decrease decimal
Also shown in Figure 27.30 are the Increase decimal and Decrease 
decimal buttons (next to the number format buttons). These allow you 
to control the number of digits displayed after the decimal point. 
Formatting cells
Excel
®
has a full range of facilities to control the way information is 
displayed, including being able to modify the font, size, attributes 
(bold, italics, underline) and alignment (within the cell). As with the 
number formats, you can set many of these using the icons in the Home 
tab, but you can find the full range of options by clicking the menu 
button on the bottom right of each section.
You can set many other number formats, as well as different versions 
of the formats already described.
•  On the Home tab, click the menu launcher button at the bottom 
right of the Number section. This brings the Format cells dialog 
box on to the screen.
•  The Number tab allows you to choose the different formats for 
numbers. Have a look at this dialog box and experiment with 
the different formats. If there are any that you don’t understand, 
or that you want more information about, search under help for 
‘number formats’.
•  If you want a real challenge, consider a mythical currency called 
the ‘Zap’. This has a rather strange format: the currency symbol 
is a capital Z and it has three digits after the decimal point (there 
are 1000 pennies in a Zap). The pennies are always preceded by 
a letter p, so 25 Zap and 75 pennies would be written Z25.p075. 
Create a custom number format for the Zap currency.
Activity: Experimenting with 
number formats
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested