After specifying the function you want to use, because it is a function, you must include the
parentheses. In the parentheses, type the necessary argument(s). Here is an example:
Private Sub cmdCreate_Click()
txtValue.Text = Application.WorksheetFunction.Sum(Range("D4:D8"))
End Sub
Conversion Functions
You may recall that when studying data types, we saw that each had a corresponding function
used to convert a string value or an expression to that type. As a reminder, the general syntax of
the conversion functions is:
ReturnType = FunctionName(Expression)
The Expression could be of any kind. For example, it could be a string or expression that would
produce a value such as the result of a calculation. The conversion function would take such a
value, string, or expression and attempt to convert it. If the conversion is successful, the function
would return a new value that is of the type specified by the ReturnType in our syntax.
The conversion functions are as follows:
Function
Name
Return Type Description
CBool
Boolean
Converts an expression into a Boolean value
CByte
Byte
Converts an expression into Byte number
CDbl
Double
Converts an expression into a floating-point number with double
precision
CDec
Decimal
Converts an expression into a decimal number
CInt
Integer
Converts an expression into an integer (natural) number
CLng
Long
Converts an expression into a long integer (a large natural)
number
CObj
Object
Converts an expression into an Object type
CSByte
SByte
Converts an expression into a signed byte
CShort
Short
Converts an expression into a short integer
CSng
Single
Converts an expression into a floating-point number with single
precision
CUInt
UInt
Converts an expression into an unsigned integer
CULng
ULong
Converts an expression into an unsigned long integer
CUShort
UShort
Converts an expression into an unsigned short integer
These functions allow you to convert a known value to a another type.
Practical Learning: Using Conversion Functions
Change the code as follows:
Sub CalculateOrder()
'
' CalculateOrder Macro
'
' Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+Shift+C
Rem Calculate the sub-total of each category of items as:
Rem SubTotal = Unit Price * Quantity
Rem And display the total in the equivalent F cell
Range("F15").Formula = CDbl(Range("D15")) * CInt(Range("E15"))
Range("F16").Formula = CDbl(Range("D16")) * CInt(Range("E16"))
Range("F17").Formula = CDbl(Range("D17")) * CInt(Range("E17"))
Range("F18").Formula = CDbl(Range("D18")) * CInt(Range("E18"))
Range("F19").Formula = CDbl(Range("D19")) * CInt(Range("E19"))
Range("F20").Formula = CDbl(Range("D20")) * CInt(Range("E20"))
Rem Retrieve the values of the cleaning total and the tax rate
Rem Use them to calculate the amount of tax
Range("I19").Formula = CDbl(Range("I17")) * CDbl(Range("I18")) / 100
Rem Calculate the total order by adding the
Rem cleaning total to the tax amount
Range("I20").Formula = CDbl(Range("I17")) + CDbl(Range("I19"))
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
151
Find text in pdf image - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to search text in pdf document; pdf searchable text converter
Find text in pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf select text; how to search pdf files for text
End Sub
Accessory Built-In Functions
Introduction
Both Microsoft Excel and the Visual Basic language provide each an extensive library of functions.
We refer to some functions as 
because you almost cannot anything about them or at
least they are very useful.
Specifying a Color
To assist you with specifying the color of anything, the VBA is equipped with a function named
RGB. Its syntax is:
Function RGB(RedValue As Byte, GreenValue As Byte, BlueValue As Byte) As long
This function takes three arguments and each must hold a value between 0 and 255. The first
argument represents the ratio of red of the color. The second argument represents the green ratio
of the color. The last argument represents the blue of the color. After the function has been
called, it produces a number whose maximum value can be 255 * 255 * 255 = 16,581,375, which
represents a color.
Practical Learning: Using the RGB Function
Locate the CreateWorkbook procedure and change its code as follows:
Sub CreateWorkbook()
'
' CreateWorkbook Macro
'
' Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+Shift+E
'
. . . No Change
Rem Change the background color of cells F15 to F20 to a light blue
Range("F15:F20").Interior.Color = RGB(210, 225, 250)
Rem Change the background color of cells I17 to I20 to a dark blue
Range("I17:I20").Interior.Color = RGB(5, 65, 165)
Rem Change the text color of cells I17 to I20 to a dark blue
Range("I17:I20").Font.Color = RGB(255, 255, 195)
Rem Hide the gridlines
ActiveWindow.DisplayGridlines = False
End Sub
1.
Return to Microsoft Excel and press Ctrl + Shift + W
2.
Press Ctrl + Shift + C to see the result
3.
Return to Microsoft Visual Basic
4.
The Sum Function
The Microsoft Excel's SUM function is used to add the numeric values of various cells. The result
can be displayed in another cell or used in an expression. Like all functions of the Microsoft Excel
library, you can use SUM visually or programmatically.
accessories
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
152
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
select text in pdf reader; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
select text in pdf file; find text in pdf image
To use the SUM() function visually, on the Ribbon, in the Home tab, the Editing section is
equipped with a button called the AutoSum
Practical Learning: Using the SUM Function
Locate the CalculateOrder procedure and change its code as follows:
Sub CalculateOrder()
'
' CalculateOrder Macro
'
' Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+Shift+C
'
Rem Calculate the sub-total of each category of items as:
Rem SubTotal = Unit Price * Quantity
Rem And display the total in the equivalent F cell
Range("F15").Formula = CDbl(Range("D15")) * CInt(Range("E15"))
Range("F16").Formula = CDbl(Range("D16")) * CInt(Range("E16"))
Range("F17").Formula = CDbl(Range("D17")) * CInt(Range("E17"))
Range("F18").Formula = CDbl(Range("D18")) * CInt(Range("E18"))
Range("F19").Formula = CDbl(Range("D19")) * CInt(Range("E19"))
Range("F20").Formula = CDbl(Range("D20")) * CInt(Range("E20"))
Rem Use the SUM() function to calculate the sum of
Rem cells F15 to F20 and display the result in cell J17
Range("I17").Formula = "=SUM(F15:F20)"
Rem Retrieve the values of the cleaning total and the tax rate
Rem Use them to calculate the amount of tax
Range("I19").Formula = CDbl(Range("I17")) * CDbl(Range("I18")) / 100
Rem Calculate the total order by adding the
Rem cleaning total to the tax amount
Range("I20").Formula = CDbl(Range("I17")) + CDbl(Range("I19"))
End Sub
1.
Return to Microsoft Excel and press Ctrl + Shift + C to see the result
2.
Enter the following values in the worksheet:
Receipt #:
1001
Order Status:
Processing
Customer Name:
Raymond Fuqua
Customer Phone:
(140) 173-9024
Date Left:
12/19/2008
Time Left:
09:42 AM
Date Expected:
12/22/2008
Time Expected:
08:00 AM
Unit Price
Qty
Shirts
1.25
4
Pants
1.95
2
Jacket
4.50
1
3.
Click cell A1
4.
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
153
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for .NET, you can unzip the package to find the RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll in the bin folder under the root
search text in multiple pdf; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document page modifying page, you will find detailed guidance is the programmatic representation of a PDF document newly created blank pages or image-only pages
how to select text in pdf; find and replace text in pdf file
Press Ctrl + Shift + C
5.
Return to Microsoft Visual Basic
6.
The Absolute Value
The absolute value of a number x is x if the number is (already) positive. If the number is
negative, then its absolute value is its positive equivalent. For example, the absolute value of 12
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
154
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
like multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file). and also font style / size for the text annotation to the user manuals listed below, or find more on
pdf text search; pdf text searchable
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
functionalities and manipulate help to find text contents on Convert Microsoft Office Excel to PDF (.pdf). Microsoft Office Excel to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf find text
is 12, while the absolute value of –12 is 12.
To get the absolute value of a number, you can use either the Microsoft Excel's ABS() or the
VBA's Abs() function. Their syntaxes are:
Function ABS(number) As Number
Function Abs(number) As Number
This function takes one argument. The argument must be a number or an expression convertible
to a number:
If the argument is a positive number, the function returns it
If the argument is zero, the function returns 0
If the argument is a negative number, the function is returns its equivalent positive value
Getting the Integral Part of a Number
If you have a decimal number but are interested only in the integral part, to assist you with
retrieving that part, the Visual Basic language provides the Int() and the Fix() functions. In the
same way, the Microsoft Excel library provides the INT() function to perform a similar operation.
Their syntaxes are:
Function Int(ByVal Number As { Number | Expression } ) As Integer
Function Fix(ByVal Number As { Number | Expression } ) As Integer
Function ABS(ByVal Number As { Number | Expression } ) As Integer
Each function must take one argument. The value of the argument must be number-based. This
means it can be an integer or a floating-point number. If the value of the argument is integer-
based, the function returns the (whole) number. Here is an example
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Integer
Number = 28635
ActiveCell = MsgBox(Int(Number), vbOKOnly, "Exercise")
End Sub
This would produce:
If the value of the argument is a decimal number, the function returns only the integral part.
Here is an example
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 7942.225 * 202.46
ActiveCell = MsgBox(Int(Number), vbOKOnly, "Exercise")
End Sub
This would produce:
This function always returns the integral part only, even if you ask it to return a floating-
point-based value. Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Single
Number = 286345.9924
ActiveCell = MsgBox(Int(Number), vbOKOnly, "Exercise")
End Sub
This would produce:
Cells Content Formatting
Introduction
When it receive values for its cells, by default, Microsoft Excel displays text left aligned and
numbers right aligned. In some situations, you will want to treat numbers as text.
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
155
XDoc.Word for .NET, Support Processing Word document and Page in .
Convert. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word to ODT. Process Word table, row and cell. Text & Image Process. Search and find text in Word. Insert image to Word page
how to select all text in pdf; pdf text select tool
C# Raster - Raster Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Image Conversion. |. Home ›› XImage.Raster ›› C# Raster: Comversion. How to Convert Raster Image to or from Various Document and Image formats.
cannot select text in pdf; search pdf documents for text
Although Microsoft Excel displays all numbers right aligned, as a smart financial and business
application, it can distinguish between different types of numbers. It can recognize a date, a
currency, or a percentage values, but the computer wants you to specify the way numbers should
be displayed, giving you the ability to decide what a particular number represents, not because
the software cannot recognize a number, but because a value can represent different things to
different people in different scenarios. For example 1.5 might represent a half teaspoon in one
spreadsheet while the same 1.5 would represent somebody's age, another spreadsheet's
percentage, or etc.
Introduction to Numbers Formatting
When it comes to displaying items, Microsoft Excel uses various default configurations. The
computer's Regional Options or Regional Settings govern how dates, numbers, and time, etc get
displayed on your computer.
Microsoft Excel recognizes numbers in various formats: accounting, scientific, fractions, and
currency. As the software product can recognize a number, you still have the ability to display the
number with a format that suits a particular scenario.
To visually control how a cell should display its number, on the Ribbon, click Home and use the
Number section.
To assist you with programmatically specifying how a cell should display its number, the Range
class is equipped with a property named Style.
To further assist with number formatting, the Visual Basic language provides a function named
Format. This function can be used for different types of values The most basic technique consists
of passing it an expression that holds the value to display. The syntax of this function is:
Function Format(ByVal Expression As Variant, _
Optional ByVal Style As String = "" _
) As String
The first argument is the value that must be formatted. Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 20502.48
ActiveCell = Format(Number)
End Sub
The second argument is optionally. It specifies the type of format you want to apply. We will see
various examples.
Formatting a Number
To visually specify that you want a cell to display its numeric value with the comma delimiter,
click the cell to give it focus. Then, in the Home tab of the Ribbon, in the Number section, click the
Comma Style button 
. The thousand numbers would display with a comma sign which makes it
easier to read.
To visually control the number of decimal values on the right side of the comma, in the Number
section of the Ribbon:
You can click the Decrease Decimal button 
to remove one decimal value. You can
continuously click the Decrease Decimal button 
to decrease the number of digits.
You can click the Increase Decimal button 
to increase the number of digits
To programmatically specify that you want a cell to display the comma style of number, assign the
"Comma" string to the Style property of the Range class. Here is an example:
Sub SpecifyComma()
ActiveCell.Style = "Comma"
End Sub
Alternatively
, t
o programmatically control how the number should display, you can pass the second argument to
the Format() function. To produce the number in a general format, you can pass the second
argument as "g", "G""f", or "F" .
To display the number with a decimal separator, pass the second argument as "n", "N", or
"Standard". Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 20502.48
ActiveCell = Format(Number, "STANDARD")
End Sub
An alternative to get this format is to call a function named FormatNumber. Its syntax is:
Function FormatNumber(
ByVal Expression As Variant,
Optional ByVal NumDigitsAfterDecimal As Integer = -1,
Optional ByVal IncludeLeadingDigit As Integer,
Optional ByVal UseParensForNegativeNumbers As Integer,
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
156
Optional ByVal GroupDigits As Integer
) As String
Only the first argument is required and it represents the value to display. If you pass only this
argument, you get the same format as the Format() function called with the Standard option.
Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 20502.48
ActiveCell = FormatNumber(Number)
End Sub
This would produce the same result as above.
If you call the Format() function with the Standard option, it would consider only the number of
digits on the right side of the decimal separator. If you want to display more digits than the
number actually has, call the FormatNumber() function and pass a second argument with the
desired number. Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 20502.48
ActiveCell = FormatNumber(Number, 4)
End Sub
In the same way, if you want the number to display with less numbers on the right side of the
decimal separator, specify that number.
We saw that you could click the Decrease Decimal button 
on the Ribbon to visually control the
number of decimal values on the right side of the comma and you could continuously click that
button to decrease the number of digits. Of course, you can also exercise this control
programmatically.
You can call the Format() function to format the number with many more options. To represent
the integral part of a number, you use the # sign. To specify the number of digits to display on
the right side of the decimal separator, type a period on the right side of # followed by the
number of 0s representing each decimal place. Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 20502.48
ActiveCell = Format(Number, "#.00000")
End Sub
The five 0s on the right side of the period indicate that you want to display 5 digits on the right
side of the period. You can enter as many # signs as you want; it would not change anything.
Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 20502.48
ActiveCell = Format(Number, "##########.00000")
End Sub
This would produce the same result as above. To specify that you want to display the decimal
separator, include its character between the # signs. Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 20502.48
ActiveCell = Format(Number, "###,#######.00000")
End Sub
You can include any other character or symbol you want in the string to be part of the result, but
you should include such a character only at the beginning or the end of the string, otherwise the
interpreter might give you an unexpected result.
Practical Learning: Using the SUM Function
Locate the CreateWorkbook procedure and change its code as follows:
Sub CreateWorkbook()
'
' CreateWorkbook Macro
'
' Keyboard Shortcut: Ctrl+Shift+W
'
. . . No Change
Rem Format the values in the unit prices
Range("D15").Style = "Comma"
Range("D16").Style = "Comma"
Range("D17").Style = "Comma"
Range("D18").Style = "Comma"
Range("D19").Style = "Comma"
Range("D20").Style = "Comma"
1.
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
157
Rem Format the values in the sub totals
Range("F15").Style = "Comma"
Range("F16").Style = "Comma"
Range("F17").Style = "Comma"
Range("F18").Style = "Comma"
Range("F19").Style = "Comma"
Range("F20").Style = "Comma"
Rem Format the values in the Order Summary section
Range("I17").Style = "Comma"
Range("I19").Style = "Comma"
Range("I20").Style = "Comma"
Rem Hide the gridlines
ActiveWindow.DisplayGridlines = False
End Sub
Return to Microsoft Excel and press Ctrl + Shift + W
2.
Enter the following values in the worksheet:
Receipt #:
1001
Order Status:
Processing
Customer Name:
Raymond Fuqua
Customer Phone:
(140) 173-9024
Date Left:
12/19/2008
Time Left:
09:42 AM
Date Expected:
12/22/2008
Time Expected:
08:00 AM
Unit Price
Qty
Shirts
1.25
4
Pants
1.95
2
Jacket
4.50
1
3.
Click cell A1
4.
Press Ctrl + Shift + C
5.
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
158
Return to Microsoft Visual Basic
6.
Formatting a Currency Value
Another regular type of number used in applications and finances is the currency. A currency
value uses a special character specified in the Control Panel. In US English, this character would
be the $ sign:
To visually that a c
ell
should display its number as currency, in the Number section of the Ribbon, click the Currency
Style button 
.
To programmatically specify that you want a cell to display its value with the currency style,
assign the "Currency" string to the Style property of the Range class. Here is an example:
Sub SpecifyComma()
ActiveCell.Style = "Currency"
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
159
End Sub
Alternatively, to programmatically display the currency symbol in the result of a cell or a text box
of a form, you can simply add it as part of the second argument to the Format() function. Here is
an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim Number As Double
Number = 205.5
ActiveCell = Format(Number, "$###,#######.00")
End Sub
Fortunately, there are more professional options. Besides the Format() function, to support
currency formatting of a number, the Visual Basic language provides the FormatCurrency()
function. Its syntax is:
Function FormatCurrency(
ByVal Expression As Variant,
Optional ByVal NumDigitsAfterDecimal As Integer = -1,
Optional ByVal IncludeLeadingDigit As Integer = -2,
Optional ByVal UseParensForNegativeNumbers As Integer = -2,
Optional ByVal GroupDigits As Integer = -2
) As String
Only the first argument is required. It is the value that needs to be formatted. Here is an
example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim UnitPrice As Double
UnitPrice = 1450.5
ActiveCell = FormatCurrency(UnitPrice)
End Sub
Notice that, by default, the FormatCurrency() function is equipped to display the currency
symbol (which, in US English is, the $ sign), the decimal separator (which in US English is the
comma), and two decimal digits. If you want to control how many decimal digits are given to the
result, pass a second argument as an integer. Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim UnitPrice As Double
UnitPrice = 1450.5
ActiveCell = FormatCurrency(UnitPrice, 4)
End Sub
Instead of calling the FormatCurrency() function to format a number to currency, you can use
the Format() function. If you do, pass it a second argument as "Currency", "c", or "C". Here is
an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim CarPrice As Double
CarPrice = 42790
ActiveCell = Format(CarPrice, "Currency")
End Sub
Formatting a Percentage Value
A percentage of a number represents its rate on a scale, usually of 100 (or more). The number is
expressed using digits accompanied by the % sign. To visually specify that a number in a cell
should be treated a percentage value, in the Number section of the Ribbon, click the Percent Style
button 
.
To programmatically use a percentage number in a cell or the control of a form, you can use the
Format() function. Besides the Format() function, to support percent values, the Visual Basic
language provides a function named FormatPercent. Its syntax is:
Function FormatPercent(
ByVal Expression As Variant,
Optional ByVal NumDigitsAfterDecimal As Integer = -1,
Optional ByVal IncludeLeadingDigit As Integer = -2,
Optional ByVal UseParensForNegativeNumbers As Integer = -2,
Optional ByVal GroupDigits As Integer = -2
) As String
Only the first argument is required and it is the number that needs to be formatted. When calling
this function, pay attention to the number you provide as argument. If the number represents a
percentage value as a fraction of 0 to 1, make sure you provide it as such. An example would be
0.25. In this case, the Visual Basic interpreter would multiply the value by 100 to give the result.
Here is an example:
Sub Exercise()
Dim DiscountRate As Double
DiscountRate = 0.25
ActiveCell = FormatPercent(DiscountRate)
End Sub
http://www.functionx.com/vbaexcel/Lesson19.htm
160
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested