how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : How to search text in pdf document Library SDK component .net wpf azure mvc VFSMod%20Final%20Report%20220520120-part1939

Definition of vegetative filter strip 
scenarios for Europe 
Colin Brown
1
, Matteo Balderacchi
2
, Wendy van Beinum
3
Ettore Capri
2
, Marco Trevisan
2
F
INAL 
R
EPORT
M
AY 
2012 
1
Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, UK 
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Via Emilia Parmense 84, 29122 Piacenza, 
Italy  
3
Food and Environment Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York, YO41 1LZ, UK 
How to search text in pdf document - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
cannot select text in pdf; make pdf text searchable
How to search text in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to search a pdf document for text; search a pdf file for text
Report Status: 
Final 
Dissemination: 
Open consultancy report 
Report prepared and 
approved by: 
Colin Brown 
Date: 
22/05/2012 
I, the undersigned, hereby declare that this study was performed under my direction 
and that this report represents a true and accurate record of the results obtained. 
22
nd
May 2012 
________________________   
_______________________ 
C. Brown, Project Manager 
Date 
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
how to search text in pdf document; can't select text in pdf file
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
pdf text search tool; search text in multiple pdf
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
TABLE OF CONTENTS ......................................................................................................... I
1
INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................... 1
1.1
VFSMOD-W ................................................................................................................. 1
1.2
Aim and objectives ....................................................................................................... 2
2
IDENTIFICATION OF SENSITIVE AND INSENSITIVE INPUT PARAMETERS ........... 4
3
RECOMMENDATIONS  FOR  INPUT  PARAMETERS  THAT  ARE  RELATIVELY 
LESS SENSITIVE, CASE-SPECIFIC OR PRE-DEFINED WITHIN THE FOCUS 
SURFACE WATER SCENARIOS ................................................................................ 8
3.1
User-defined parameters .............................................................................................. 8
3.2
Parameters derived directly from the FOCUS R Scenarios .......................................... 8
3.2.1
Buffer width perpendicular to the flow (FWIDTH) ......................................... 8
3.2.2
Slope (SOA) ................................................................................................ 9
3.2.3
Manning’s rough
ness within the filter (RNA) ................................................ 9
3.2.4
Green-
Ampt’s average suction (SAV)
.......................................................... 9
3.3
Input parameters relating to vegetation in the VFS ..................................................... 10
3.4
Miscellaneous ............................................................................................................ 10
4
ANALYSIS  OF  VARIATION  WITHIN  THE  FOCUS  R  SCENARIOS  IN  SOIL 
HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND WATER CONTENT AT SATURATION .............. 11
4.1
Spatial analysis of variation in soil hydraulic properties within the FOCUS R 
scenarios .................................................................................................................... 11
4.1.1
Pre-processing of spade2v11.dbf .............................................................. 11
4.1.2
Calculation of soil hydraulic parameters .................................................... 12
4.1.3
Identification of unique soils within the FOCUS R scenarios ...................... 12
4.1.4
Assessment of distribution functions for K
s
θ
and 
θ
fc
................................ 16
4.2
Modelling with VFSMOD-W to define conservative values for K
s
and 
θ
s
..................... 17
4.2.1
Generation of run-on hydrographs ............................................................. 17
4.2.2
Methodology for VFSMOD-W simulations ................................................. 19
4.2.3
Results for VFSMOD-W simulations .......................................................... 20
4.3
Influence of conversion of arable land to grassland on soil hydraulic parameters ....... 27
4.3.1
Conclusion regarding changes to hydraulic parameters within vegetative 
filter strips ................................................................................................................ 30
5
PROPERTIES OF ERODED SEDIMENT ................................................................... 31
5.1
Enrichment of eroded sediment with clay and organic carbon .................................... 32
5.1.1
Conclusion for clay and organic carbon content of the sediment (PCTC, 
PCTOC) 35
5.2
Mean particle diameter in suspended sediment .......................................................... 36
5.2.1
Conclusion for sediment particle size diameter (DP) ................................. 39
6
SUMMARY  OF  PARAMETER  VALUES  FOR  VEGETATIVE  FILTER  STRIP 
SCENARIOS FOR EUROPE ...................................................................................... 40
7
NATURE AND LEGISLATIVE BASIS OF EXISTING VEGETATIVE FILTER STRIP 
STRUCTURES ACROSS EUROPE ........................................................................... 42
7.1
Roles for vegetative filter strips ................................................................................... 42
7.2
Legislative basis ......................................................................................................... 42
7.3
Examples  of  stakeholder  support  for  vegetative  filter  strips  as  mitigation 
measures ................................................................................................................... 44
7.4
Implemention of VFS at the EU level .......................................................................... 46
7.4.1
National situation for Italy .......................................................................... 46
7.4.2
Examples of regional support in Italy ......................................................... 47
8
REFERENCES ........................................................................................................... 49
APPENDIX 1
DUPLICATE FIELDS IDENTIFIED WITHIN THE SPADE DATABASE 
(SPADE2V11.DBF) ORGANIZED BY SOIL MAPPING UNIT, SOIL TYPOLOGICAL 
UNIT AND LAND USE................................................................................................ 56
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
search pdf files for text programmatically; search pdf files for text
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
how to make pdf text searchable; pdf text searchable
ii 
APPENDIX 2 
LITERATURE SEARCH FOR ENRICHMENT OF ERODED SEDIMENT .. 57
APPENDIX 3 
LITERATURE  SEARCH  FOR  RESEARCH  INTO  THE  ROLE  OF 
VEGETATED  FILTER  STRIPS  AS  MITIGATION  MEASURES  FOR  DIFFUSE 
CONTAMINATION ..................................................................................................... 58
APPENDIX 4.
EXAMPLES  OF  VEGETATIVE  FILTER  STRIP  STRUCTURES 
ACROSS EUROPE .................................................................................................... 61
A3.1
Austria .......................................................................................................... 61
A3.2
Denmark ....................................................................................................... 62
A3.3
Germany....................................................................................................... 63
A3.4
Italy ............................................................................................................... 64
A3.5
Norway ......................................................................................................... 66
A3.6
Scotland ....................................................................................................... 67
A3.7
The Netherlands ........................................................................................... 67
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
find text in pdf image; pdf find highlighted text
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
search text in pdf using java; pdf select text
INTRODUCTION 
The  FOCUS  Surface  Water  Scenarios  group  developed  standardised  approaches  to 
estimating  predicted  environmental  concentrations  of  pesticides  in  surface  water  and 
sediment for use in aquatic risk assessment for Europe (FOCUS, 2001). FOCUS Steps 1-3 
adopt standardised approaches that account for transfer of pesticides to water in spray drift, 
drainflow and surface runoff. At Step 3, these processes are simulated by a spray drift 
calculator, the MACRO model and the PRZM model, respectively. The TOXSWA model is 
used to incorporate the fate of pesticides within surface waters. 
FOCUS Steps 3 is designed to provide realistic but conservative estimates of exposure 
concentrations under idealised conditions. If unacceptable risk is demonstrated based on 
Step 3 simulations, there is the opportunity to refine the exposure estimate by considering 
the  range  in  likely  use  conditions,  including  additional  environmental  processes,  or 
considering the influence of mitigation measures on the various transport processes. The 
FOCUS Landscape and Mitigation Group considered and made recommendations on the 
options for refining the exposure estimate in Step 4 modelling (FOCUS, 2007
). The Group’s 
report was considered by the EFSA Panel on Plant Protection Products and their Residues 
(EFSA, 2006). 
Vegetative filter strips (VFS) are the most widely implemented mitigation measure to reduce 
transfer of pesticides and other pollutants (e.g. sediment, phosphorus) to surface waters in 
surface runoff. These are densely vegetated strips of land designed to intercept surface 
runoff, often located at the downslope field border. The VFS acts as a physical impediment 
to surface runoff, reducing the kinetic energy of the flowing water and reducing passage of 
water, sediment and diffuse  pollutants across  the strip through infiltration of water and 
trapping of sediment. VFS are a readily accessible measure for farmers which are cheap to 
install and maintain; they are widely promoted through environmental stewardship schemes 
across Europe (see Section 7). 
The FOCUS Landscape and Mitigation Group reviewed the available literature on efficacy of 
VFS for reducing pesticide transport in surface runoff (FOCUS, 2007). The Group concluded 
that whilst there was considerable variability in the efficacy of buffers under the range of 
conditions that had been tested, it was possible to recommend conservative factors for the 
reduction  in  water,  sediment  and  pesticide  load  transferring  across  a  VFS.  They 
recommended a set of empirical factors for use in exposure assessment with factors varying 
with (i) size of the VFS, and (ii) transport primarily in the aqueous or sediment phases. At the 
time that the FOCUS Landscape and Mitigation Group undertook its work (2002-2004), there 
were no appropriate modelling tools available to simulate reduction in pesticide load in 
surface runoff across a VFS. Subsequently, work has been undertaken in the  USA to 
develop and evaluate such a model (VFSMOD-W; Sabbagh et al., 2009; Poletika et al., 
2009).  There  is  widespread  interest  in  applying  this  model within  regulatory  exposure 
assessment. This project looks at the parameterisation of the model needed to underpin 
application for regulatory purposes in Europe. 
1.1  VFSMOD-W 
Numerical process-based models have been available for some time for predicting runoff 
and sediment reduction across a vegetative filter strip (Sabbagh et al. 2010). VFSMOD-W is 
a finite-element, field-scale, storm-based model developed to route the incoming surface flow 
hydrograph and sedigraph from an adjacent source area through a VFS and to calculate the 
resulting outflow, infiltration (based on the extended Green-Ampt equation for unsteady 
rainfall) and sediment trapping (based on the GRASSF model) (Muñoz-Carpena et al., 1999; 
2004). More recently, research by Sabbagh et al. (2009) and Poletika et al. (2009) has 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
converting pdf to searchable text format; find and replace text in pdf
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option. 'Open a document Dim doc As
search pdf for text in multiple files; how to select text on pdf
developed and evaluated an empirical model for trapping of pesticide by vegetative filter 
strips.  The  model  has  a  foundation  of  hydrological,  sediment-  and  chemical-specific 
parameters:  
ܽ൅ܾ(  )൅ܿ(  )൅݀(  ( 
൅ ))൅݁(  )
where 
ΔP
is the pesticide removal efficiency (%), 
ΔQ
is water infiltration into the buffer (% of 
runon plus rainfall incident on the buffer), 
ΔE
is the sediment reduction (%), %C is the clay 
content of the sediment entering the VFS, F
pH
is a phase distribution factor, and a, bcd 
and e  are  regression  parameters  with  values  of  24.8,  0.54,  0.53,  -2.42  amd  -0.89, 
respectively. F
pH
defines the distribution of pesticide in runon between solution and sediment 
phases: 
(       ) 
)
where Q
i
and E
i
are the volume of water (L) and mass of sediment (kg) entering the VFS, 
Koc is the organic carbon coefficient of the pesticide (L kg
-1
) and %OC is the organic carbon 
content of the sediment entering the VFS (Sabbagh et al., 2009). 
The model was developed through statistical analysis of an extensive dataset (n=47) of 
experimental results for pesticide removal from runoff across vegetative filter strips. The 
dataset included a range in chemical properties, soil types, buffer sizes and hydrological 
conditions. 
Plotting predicted vs. measured ΔP for the training dataset yielded an r
2
of 0.86 
(Figure 1a; Sabbagh et al., 2009). The model was then evaluated against an independent 
dataset of experimental measurements (n=120) yielding a plot with r
2
of 0.82 (Figure 1b). 
1.2  Aim and objectives 
The overall aim of this project was to develop scenarios for vegetative filter strips that would 
be suitable for use with the VFSMOD-W programme within Step 4 modelling for aquatic risk 
assessment in Europe. 
The specific objectives were: 
1.  To consider the relative sensitivity of input parameters for VFSMOD-W; 
2.  To assign conservative default values to relatively insensitive parameters that are 
representative of vegetative filter strip conditions across Europe; 
3.  To  characterise  the  range  of  conditions  across  Europe  for  the  more  sensitive 
parameters and recommend appropriate parameter values to represent this variation 
within regulatory modelling; 
4.  To assess the nature of existing vegetative filter strip structures across Europe; 
5.  To make recommendations on the approach for incorporating simulation of vegetative 
filter strips into risk assessment procedures. 
Figure 1.  Predicted vs. measured reductions in pesticide transfer across vegetative filter 
strips for a) development (n=47) and b) independent evaluation (n=120) of an 
empirical model for pesticide trapping (Sabbagh et al., 2009). 
a) 
b) 
Identification of sensitive and insensitive input parameters 
The VFSMOD-W model has 18 primary input parameters (Table 1). An initial task was to 
separate these parameters into those that are relatively sensitive or relatively insensitive for 
predictions of changes in pesticide load in transit through vegetative filter strips. Greatest 
effort would then be invested into determining the actual range of values that occur for the 
more sensitive parameters; for the less sensitive parameters, the determination of realistic, 
conservative values is considered the most appropriate approach. 
Table 1. 
Input parameters for the VFSMOD-W model 
Parameter 
Units 
Description 
FWIDTH 
Effective flow width of the strip (perpendicular to the flow) 
VL 
Length in the direction of the flow 
RNA(I) 
s m
-1/3 
Filter Manning’s roughness 
n for each segment 
SOA(I) 
m m
-1 
Filter slope for each segment 
VKS 
m s
-1 
Soil vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity in the VFS 
SAV 
Green-
Ampt’s average suction at the wetting front
OS 
m
3
m
-3
Saturated soil water content, 
θ
s 
OI 
m
3
m
-3
Initial soil water content, 
θ
i 
SCHK 
Relative distance from the upper filter edge where check for ponding is made 
SS 
cm 
Average spacing of grass stems 
VN 
s cm
-1/3
Filter media (grass) modified Manning’s 
n 
cm 
Filter grass height 
VN2 
s m
-1/3
Bare surface Manning’s 
n for sediment inundated area in grass filter 
DP 
cm 
Sediment particle size diameter (d
50
COARSE 
Fraction of incoming sediment with particle diameter >0.0037 cm 
KOC 
Pesticide organic carbon partition coefficient 
PCTOC 
Percentage of organic carbon in sediment 
PCTC 
Percentage clay in sediment 
An existing, comprehensive sensitivity analysis was  used  to identify the most sensitive 
parameters (Muñoz-Carpena et al., 2010). This study used measured field experiments as 
base cases in order to evaluate the sensitivity of all 18 input parameters under a range of 
conditions. The primary features of the study were: 
Three  VFS  experiments  undertaken  on  three  different  soil  types  known  to  be 
vulnerable to surface runoff. 
Six contrasting pesticides with ranges in Koc from 70 to 13,400 L kg
-1
All 18 input parameters were considered to avoid subjectivity associated with any 
priori selection. Parameters assigned distributions (normal, log-normal, triangular or 
uniform) based on available data and the range of conditions in the field experiments. 
Two state-of-the-art sensitivity analysis methods were employed to minimise any 
influence of methodology on the outcome. The screening method of Morris (1991) is 
a one-at-a-time approach with each parameter varied a discrete number of times 
within its probability distribution space. The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) 
method of Saltelli (1999) is a variance-based method where all parameters are varied 
simultaneously  to  determine  the  fraction  of  the  total  output  variance  that  is 
attributable to each input parameter. 
Figure 2 and Figure 3 summarise parameter sensitivity based on the screening method for 
infiltration/sedimentation  and  change  in  pesticide  load  in  transit  through  the  VFS, 
respectively  (Muñoz-Carpena  et  al.,  2010).  Results  show  that  the  saturated  hydraulic 
conductivity of the soil (VKS) was the most sensitive parameter for all three components - 
infiltration 
(ΔQ
), sedimentation (
ΔE
), and pesticide trapping efficiency (
ΔP). VKS was the 
dominant parameter for ΔQ 
with other parameters significantly less sensitive for all three 
experiments. T
he particle diameter of the sediment (DP) and Manning’s n for 
the filter media 
(VN) were also 
sensitive for ΔE for at least one of the experiments (Figure 
2b and 2d). 
Change in pesticide load in transit through the VFS is the primary output in modelling for 
pesticide risk assessment. Here saturated hydraulic conductivity was consistently the most 
sensitive parameter and it was dominant in sensitivity for the experiments of Poletika et al. 
(2009) and Patzold et al. (2007). Clay content of the sediment (PCTC) was also relatively 
sensitive for the Arora et al. (1996) study with several more minor influences on model 
results. 
Full results of the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test are given by Muñoz-Carpena et al. 
(2010) and they are not reproduced here because of the complexity of the analysis. Results 
showed that the influence of individual parameters was dominant for the studies of Arora and 
Patzold,  explaining  >84%  of  the  total  variation  in  outputs.  The  Poletika  study  had  a 
particularly  high  hydraulic  loading  rate  and  here  there  was  a  greater  contribution  of 
interactions between parameters (first-order effects explained 48-64% of the total variation in 
outputs). The FAST results supported the conclusion that VKS was the single most sensitive 
input parameter, especially for ΔQ and ΔP. VKS explained 49
-85% of the total variance in 
ΔQ across the three experiments and 50
-
80% of the total variance in ΔP. The results also 
confirmed that clay c
ontent of the soil (PCTC) was an important influence on ΔP for the 
Arora study. 
The sensitivity analysis shows that VKS is the dominant parameter within VFSMOD-W in 
terms of sensitivity. Saturated soil water content (OS) is less sensitive but closely related to 
VKS. Section 4 describes work to assess the range in these two parameters within the areas 
of  the  FOCUS  R  scenarios  and  to  define  realistic  worst-case  values  for  use  in  risk 
assessment. Section 5 describes work to look at key characteristics of eroded sediment in 
terms  of  size,  clay  and  organic  carbon  content  (DP,  COARSE,  PCTC,  PCTOC). 
Recommendations for the remaining input parameters to VFSMOD-W are set out in Section 
3.  
Figure 2.  Parameter sensitivity determined using the Morris (1991) screening method for 
infiltration (
Δ
Q) and sedimentation (
Δ
E) across the vegetative filter strip for the three 
experiments used as base cases (Muñoz-Carpena et al., 2010). The most sensitive 
parameters are furthest from the origin; least sensitive parameters are closest to the 
origin and are not labelled to aid clarity. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested