how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : How to select text in pdf reader application Library tool html .net winforms online VFSMod%20Final%20Report%20220520124-part1943

37 
The  d50  values were  derived for  178  measurements from  33  locations.  No significant 
relationship was found between the d50 and the properties of the parent soil (silt, clay, sand 
or organic carbon content). A weak relationship was found between the d50 and the silt 
content of the soil (Figure 23). 
Figure 23.   Natural log values of the median aggregate diameter (d50 in µm) in runoff plotted 
against the silt content of the parent soil (derived from data by Elliot et al. 1989) 
Other measurements for aggregate size in sediment were reported by Chisci and Martinez 
(1993) and Slattery and Burt (1997). Chisci and Martinez reported a d50 of 300 
μ
m for runoff 
sediment from an agricultural field in Sicily, and Slattery and Burt reported d50 values 
between 15 and 140 
μ
m in runoff sediment in six events from a field in England. Other 
authors reported only size fractions of the dispersed sediment.  
Figure 24 shows a comparison of the d50 values measured for runoff sediment, plotted 
against the d50 of the parent soil. As discussed before, the d50 of the non-dispersed 
sediment is often larger than the d50 of the dispersed parent soil. The graph shows no 
relationship between the d50 in runoff and the d50 of the parent soil.  
Figure 25 shows a histogram of all measurements for aggregate size in runoff sediment 
(derived from data by Elliot et al., 1989, Chisci and Martinez, 1993, and Slattery and Burt, 
1997). Only one sample had a d50 smaller than 20 
μ
m (0.5%). The majority of samples had 
a d50 value smaller than 200 
μ
m (74%). 
y = -0.0241x + 5.6796
R² = 0.4041
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
0
20
40
60
80
ln(d50) sediment
%silt parent soil
How to select text in pdf reader - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf image; how to select text in a pdf
How to select text in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to select text on pdf; pdf text searchable
38 
Figure 24.   Values for median aggregate diameter (d50) in runoff sediment, from data by Elliot et 
al. (1989), Chisci and Martinez (1993) and Slattery and Burt (1997) 
Figure 25.   Histogram of sediment d50 values shown in Figure 24. From data by Elliot et al. 
(1989), Chisci and Martinez (1993) and Slattery and Burt (1997), n=185. 
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
d50 sediment (µm)
d50 parent soil (µm)
Elliot
Chisci & Martinez
Slattery & Burt
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
0
-
20
20
-
40
40
-
60
60
-
80
80
-
100
100
-
120
120
-
140
140
-
160
160
-
180
180
-
200
200
-
220
220
-
240
240
-
260
260
-
280
280
-
300
300
-
320
320
-
340
340
-
360
360
-
380
380
-
400
400
-
420
420
-
440
440
-
460
460
-
480
480
-
500
500
-
520
520
-
540
% of samples
d50 range (µm)
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
search pdf files for text programmatically; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
find text in pdf files; how to select text in pdf reader
39 
5.2.1  Conclusion for sediment particle size diameter (DP) 
In the absence of measured inflow sediment characteristics, the VFSMOD-W users guide 
(Muñoz-Carpena and Parsons, 2011) recommends that an estimate of the average diameter 
of eroded particles can be made based on the soil texture of the contributing field (Table 11). 
However, in the current review no relationships were found between the d50 in runoff and 
the properties of the parent soil. Enrichment and particle size distribution in runoff is very 
much determined by the intensity (droplet impact) of the rainfall event, and ensuing runoff 
rate rather than the soil properties. It is not possible to predict these properties for the 
FOCUS scenarios. 
Table 11.  Estimates of d50 based on texture of the parent soil (Woolhiser et al., 1990) 
Soil texture (USDA) 
Expected DP (µm) 
Soil texture 
Expected dp 
Clay 
0 - 45 
Clay-loam 
5 - 30 
Silty-clay 
2 - 45 
Sandy-loam 
35-160 
Silty-clay-loam 
3 - 46 
Loamy-sand 
90 - 180 
Silt-loam 
3 - 50 
Sandy - clay 
2 - 130 
Silt 
8 - 30 
Sandy-clay-loam 
21 - 160 
Loam 
9 - 60 
Sand 
140-200+ 
Given the lack of relationship between d50 and parent soil texture and the wide ranges for 
DP shown in Table 11, it was decided to propose a constant, conservative value for DP 
independent of parent soil texture. The majority of measurements for d50 were larger than 
20 
μ
m (Figure 25). A default value for DP of 20 
μ
m would give the smallest reduction of 
particles in runoff and therefore a conservative worst-case for pesticide removal.  
The parameter COARSE (proportion of eroded sediment particles with diameter >0.0037 cm) 
is directly related to the value for DP. If DP is 0.0037 cm (37 
μ
m), then COARSE takes the 
value 0.5. COARSE is relatively insensitive within the model; a value of 0.4 is recommended 
for use within the scenarios to fit with a definition of DP that is smaller than 0.0037 cm. 
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. NET class without adobe reader installed. Provide
search text in pdf using java; search pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
pdf find and replace text; text searchable pdf
40 
Summary  of  parameter  values  for  vegetative  filter  strip 
scenarios for Europe 
Table 12 provides an overview of the recommended parameterisation of European VFS 
scenarios for use with  the VFSMOD-W at Step 4 of  aquatic risk assessment.  Several 
conservative assumptions are built into the parameterisation: 
VKS (saturated hydraulic conductivity in the VFS) is the dominant input parameter to 
the model, accounting for 50-80% of 
variability in ΔP in sensitivity analyses with 
experiments on three soils and with a range in pesticides. The 90
th
percentile worst-
case value has been taken for this parameter to ensure that the overall parameter set 
achieves at least this level of conservatism.  
Soils within established vegetative filter strips will generally have larger saturated 
hydraulic conductivity and saturated water content relative to the same soil under 
arable cultivation. In turn, this will increase the potential for infiltration of runoff water 
within the VFS and thus increase the potential for reduction in pesticide loading. This 
change in hydraulic parameters within the VFS is ignored within the parameterisation 
and the parameters are set conservatively to those within the bulk field.  
An absolute worst-case value is taken for the sediment particle size diameter (DP). 
This approach is taken because literature review did not yield any robust relationship 
between DP and properties of the parent soil or of the runoff event. 
SOA (slope within the VFS) is set to the same as that within the agricultural fields 
defined within the FOCUS Surface Water Scenarios (FOCUS, 2001). This is a worst-
case assumption as VFS structures are frequently located on breaks in slope and 
have shallower slope than the bulk field, and thus a greater potential for infiltration of 
runoff water and trapping of sediment. 
ΔP is negatively related to percentage clay content in the sediment and positively related to 
the percentage organic carbon content. Literature review did not yield any robust approach 
to calculate enrichment of sediment with clay and organic carbon relative to the bulk soil. 
Hence, it is assumed that eroded sediment has the same clay and organic carbon content as 
the bulk soil. The assumption for the two components will have opposing effects and thus 
cancel out to some extent. Nevertheless, it would be useful to update this simplification in the 
parameterisation as the science base develops.  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
make pdf text searchable; search pdf documents for text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
find text in pdf image; select text pdf file
41 
Table 12.  Summary of recommended input parameters for European VFS scenarios for use in 
conjunction with the VFSMOD-W model 
Parameter  Units 
Description 
Recommended parameter value 
R1 
R2 
R3 
R4 
VL 
Length in the direction of the flow 
User input 
FWIDTH 
Effective flow width of the strip 
(perpendicular to the flow)
1
100
100 
100 
100 
RNA(I) 
s m
-1/3 
Filter Manning’s roughness 
n for each 
segment 
0.4 
0.4 
0.4 
0.4 
SOA(I) 
m m
-1 
Filter slope for each segment 
0.03 
0.05 
0.05 
0.05 
VKS 
m s
-1 
Soil vertical saturated hydraulic 
conductivity in the VFS 
7.04 x 10
-7
2.79 x 10
-6
9.25 x 10
-7
1.52 x 10
-6
SAV 
Green-
Ampt’s average suction at the 
wetting front 
0.17 
0.11 
0.21 
0.22 
OS 
m
3
m
-3
Saturated soil water content, 
θ
s 
0.447 
0.403 
0.472 
0.420 
OI 
m
3
m
-3
Initial soil water content, 
θ
i 
Dynamic modelling within SWAN
2
SCHK 
Relative distance from the upper filter 
edge where check for ponding is 
made 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
SS 
cm 
Average spacing of grass stems 
1.63 
1.63 
1.63 
1.63 
VN 
s cm
-1/3
Filter media (grass) modified 
Manning’s 
n 
0.012 
0.012 
0.012 
0.012 
cm 
Filter grass height 
10 
10 
10 
10 
VN2 
s m
-1/3
Bare surface Manning’s 
n for 
sediment inundated area in grass 
filter 
0.05 
0.05 
0.05 
0.05 
DP 
cm 
Sediment particle size diameter (d
50
0.002 
0.002 
0.002 
0.002 
COARSE 
Fraction of incoming sediment with 
particle diameter >0.0037 cm 
0.4 
0.4 
0.4 
0.4 
KOC 
Pesticide organic carbon partition 
coefficient 
User input 
PCTOC 
Percentage of organic carbon in 
sediment 
1.2 
4.0 
1.0 
0.6 
PCTC 
Percentage clay in sediment 
13 
14 
34 
25 
1
It is anticipated that simulations will most frequently consider entry of surface runoff into the FOCUS stream; 
where the FOCUS pond is considered, FWIDTH will be 30 m 
2
SWAN is a higher-tier modelling tool designed to incorporate the effect of mitigation measures into calculations 
for European aquatic exposure assessment (contact: gerhard.goerlitz@bayer.com)  
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
pdf searchable text; how to search pdf files for text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
search pdf for text; search text in pdf image
42 
Nature and legislative basis of existing vegetative filter strip 
structures across Europe 
7.1  Roles for vegetative filter strips 
While vegetative filter strips clearly have a common role in reducing runoff of pesticides and 
nutrients and reducing impact of erosion there is variation in design, management and legal 
acceptance across the European Union. A literature review was undertaken to evaluate 
information on the nature of VFS in different Member States. In parallel, data from the legal 
frameworks  in  place  were  collated  to  better  understand  the  potential  support  for 
implementation of VFS. Artificial wetlands and riparian buffers are also effective mitigation 
measures, with a common purpose of reducing contamination of surface waters through 
trapping and retention  of residues, these systems have been omitted from  this  review 
because the complexity of implementation, management and modelling representation of 
such systems differ considerably from the edge of field vegetative buffers and thus lie 
outside the remit of the current research project. 
Figure 26. Different functions of vegetative filter strips 
Vegetative  filter  strips  have  recently  gained  a  prominent  position  within  various  policy 
instruments because of their multi-functionality (Figure 26). Moreover, they can offer benefits 
in terms of mitigation of high profile environmental risks and extend provision of the various 
ecosystem services. Basically, they are implemented where and when they serve specific 
policy objectives. Thus, VFS can be effective measures to support many protection goals. 
For example, they can be developed in order to address erosion and nutrient losses, but they 
are also considered an effective mitigation strategy for pesticides.  
A range of research has been undertaken in Europe and elsewhere to investigate the role of 
VFS as mitigation measures for diffuse contamination. Appendix 3 provides a summary of 
literature sources of information. Appendix 4 provides photographs of VFS structures within 
different EU Member States. 
7.2  Legislative basis 
At the EU level, when considering environmental risk prevention and mitigation, there are 
three main policies that include VFS as a tool for risks reduction or ecosystem improvement. 
The three policy areas refer to: 
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
converting pdf to searchable text format; select text in pdf reader
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
pdf text search; how to search text in pdf document
43 
Protection of water from pollution with nitrates; 
Sustainable use of pesticides; and  
Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). 
Council Directive 91/676/EEC of December, 12
th
1991 - concerning the protection of waters 
against pollution caused by nitrates from agricultural sources - requests Member States to 
designate vulnerable areas from the point of view of nitrate pollution and to establish national 
action plans to manage this risk. Within such action plans they are required to establish 
recommendations of good agricultural practice in order to reduce the impact of nitrates. In 
many  Member  States  the  good  agricultural  practice  guidelines  include  references  to 
establishing vegetative strips or buffer zones along water courses. 
However, the framework of guidelines for implementation and management is not uniform, 
as the decision regarding the setting of the relevant requirements for the strips was left to the 
Member States. Size, position, restrictions related to the implementation and management of 
the strips and other conditions are specific to each Member State and sometimes they can 
differ from one region to another within the same State. Moreover, even if the requirements 
of this Directive are applicable to all Member States, only EU 15 Member States currently 
have  an  obligation  to  perform  checks  within  the  cross-compliance  schemes  for  the 
implementation of the provisions of the Directive at farm level. 
Directive 2009/128/EC of October, 21
st 
2009, establishing a framework for Community action 
to achieve the sustainable use of pesticides, in Article 11.2.c) requires Member States to 
support the use of mitigation measures which can minimize the risk of off-site pollution 
caused by spray drift, drainflow and runoff. These measures include the 
establishment of 
appropriately-sized buffer zones for  the protection of non-target  aquatic organisms and 
safeguard zones for surface and groundwater used for the abstraction of drinking water, 
where pesticides must not be used or stored
”. 
The Directive was approved in 2009, but Member States had to transpose it into national 
legislation by the end of 2011 and they will be expected to draft National Action Plans to 
reach the objectives set by the Directive by the end of 2012. Hence the implementation into 
practice of this requirement is rather low across the EU, and it is effectively underway mainly 
in those Member States that already had action plans for the use of pesticides such as 
Belgium, Denmark and France. 
In the framework of the CAP, when granting direct payments to farmers, Member States 
need  to  check  the compliance of  the  farm  with  the  statutory  standards  (Annex  III  of 
Regulation 73/2009), which include the protection of water from nitrates, as described above. 
As  already  mentioned,  this  is  currently  required  only  in  the  EU  15  Member  States.  
Additionally, when judging whether a farmer has complied with maintaining land in Good 
Agricultural and Environmental Conditions, there is a requirement to preserve landscape 
features which include field margins. However, there is no EU evaluation of the size and 
scale of such field margins with respect to either their structure, position or function. 
The draft legislation for the future CAP includes a provision requiring farmers to devote 7% of 
their land to ecological focus areas with the purpose of enhancing the provision of ecosystem 
services  with  a  focus  on  biodiversity.  Such  areas  could  include  the  establishment  of 
vegetative field strips or field margins. The decision on this legislation will be taken during 
2012-2013 and it will be enforced starting from 2014. 
44 
7.3  Examples of stakeholder support for vegetative filter strips as mitigation 
measures 
There is clearly an increasing need to explore how mitigation measures can be supported 
and implemented in a flexible and intelligent manner to maintain registrations and agricultural 
production.  Effective  support  for  practical  and  effective  implementation  of  mitigation 
measures by farmers and recognition of a role within the regulatory system as problem-
solving techniques requires: 
Demonstration of efficacy; 
Demonstration of practicality; 
Demonstration of flexibility; 
Increased stakeholder awareness of techniques; 
Improved communication and recognition; 
Capability to represent within risk assessments; and 
Clarification of role of legislative drivers and instruments for adoption. 
The primary challenges from the perspective of the farmer are practicality and financial 
motivation for adoption of mitigation measures aiming to reduce non-point source pollution 
inputs. Thus the key drivers for take-
up from the farmer’s perspective are
:; 
A need to demonstrate that measures can be implemented in a simple, flexible 
manner; 
A need to emphasise that they be customised to vulnerable landscapes; and 
A need to demonstrate cross-compliance benefits (including economic) in the context 
of other environmental goals.
The  European  Crop  Protection  Association  has  developed  a  network  of  research 
stakeholders  to develop a  support framework for improving take-up and  recognition of 
mitigation measures focusing upon the considerations highlighted above. Initially efforts were 
directed  at  addressing  point  source  releases  through  the  TOPPS  initiative.  This  was 
subsequently  expanded to consider  non-point source releases through the PROWADIS 
initiative that built upon the successful foundation established by TOPPS. The mitigation 
concept developed by this initiative to support vegetative filter strips (amongst a wide range 
of other mitigation techniques) to reduce run-off and erosion releases is summarised below . 
Diagnosis. The aim of the diagnosis is to understand the water pathways in a catchment and 
field  in  order  to  describe  situations  reflecting  different  runoff  /  erosion  risk  scenarios.  
Available data for the catchment but also field observations are needed to describe the risk 
situations.  This is  most  effectively  carried  out  through reference  to  field methods  and 
decision tree techniques developed to support decision making.  
Toolbox of mitigation measures. The PROWADIS initiative has developed a list of effective 
measures with descriptions of how each measure functions, how to establish and how to 
maintain them (full details available at: www.topps-life.org/). In some cases there are broader 
benefits from implementation of such measures and these are also noted. A wide range of 
measures may be considered by farmers including soil management options, changes to 
cropping  practices,  development  of  retention  structures  for  run-off,  implementation  of 
vegetative  buffers  and  recommendations  for  effective,  low-vulnerability  product  use. 
Techniques  should  be  customised  to  the  agricultural  landscape  to  address  localised 
45 
problems/vulnerabilities.    CORPEN/CEMAGREF  illustrate  how  six  structures  may  be 
integrated into the farming landscape (Figure 27): 
1.  In-field buffer, used to break up a long slope inside a cultivated field; 
2.  Edge of field buffer zone; 
3.  Edge of field buffer zone in down slope corner of a field, where water is concentrated; 
4.  Grassed talweg, to reduce concentrated water flow; 
5.  Large grassed buffer zone, used to intercept, disperse and infiltrate concentrating 
water flow exiting from the upslope talweg; and 
6.  Riparian Buffer: grassed buffer strip between edge of field and a surface water body, 
used to intercept and diffuse runoff from the upslope field. 
Figure 27.   Examples for buffer positioning in a landscape (Source: TOPPS PROWADIS from 
CORPEN / CEMAGREF) 
Best  management  practices (BMPs). Ultimately, the background of individual measures 
developed  within  the  toolbox  has  been  condensed  into  practical  recommendations  for 
implementation and maintenance through the development of best management practices.  It 
is noted that a wide range of vegetative buffers may be implemented, directed at addressing 
specific roles within the agricultural landscape. The best management practices proposed by 
PROWADIS for edge-of-field VFS most directly represented within VFSMod are summarised 
in brief below. 
Buffer location and sizing. Buffers may vary in size, largely based on the buffering objectives, 
the soil and landscape characteristics and their interaction with other mitigation measures. A 
thorough analysis and diagnosis are necessary to determine the optimum buffer size and 
location. VFSMOD is a helpful modelling tool to size the respective buffer in consideration of 
the environmental properties. The correct positioning of the buffer in the landscape is usually 
more important than its width for its effectiveness to reduce runoff. Other parameters such as 
soil  permeability,  soil  saturation,  size  and  slope  of  the  runoff  area  also  have  to  be 
considered. 
Water infiltration may be more effective in buffers planted with tall and ligneous vegetation 
due to the more extensive root system. Dense grass vegetation is more efficient to slow 
46 
down surface water flow and thus enhances trapping of eroded soil particles. Combinations 
of both systems may be able to combine the benefits of both vegetation types. Selection of 
species for vegetated buffer strips needs to consider local requirements. Species selection 
may also be influenced by other buffer functions, such as providing bee forage or habitat for 
selected plants. 
Maintenance and care. Buffers need to be maintained and managed to remain functional. 
Good surface roughness in the VFS is important to trap soil particles in runoff water. For 
grassed buffers a regular mowing of the grass is necessary. The average height of the grass 
should be around 10 cm and the maximum height should not exceed 25 cm to maintain erect 
grass.  Buffer  efficiency  is  also  reduced  by  soil  sediment  accumulating  on  the  buffer: 
therefore a regular sediment removal or dispersion of sediment on VFS is needed. 
Use of buffer zones as animal pasture might be possible, but grazing with large animals 
increases soil compaction and therefore can negatively impact infiltration capacity of the soil.  
In  this  respect  also  the  contamination  of  surface  water  with  additional  nutrients  and 
pathogenic microbes from animal faeces needs to be considered. The trafficking of heavy 
machinery on VFS should be minimised as far as possible to prevent soil compaction.  
7.4  Implemention of VFS at the EU level 
Due to the agricultural and environmental policies currently under implementation in Europe 
VFS will be extensively adopted in the different Member States. The green economy and the 
greening of the supply chain with the efforts to reduce non-point source pollution will be 
another reason for a rapid application of this ecological infrastructure at farm and basin level. 
The current status in quantitative terms is difficult to estimate and requires specific research. 
For illustrative purposes we report below the example of Italy.  
7.4.1  National situation for Italy 
Buffer strips in Italy have been introduced by the Ministerial Decree of December, 22
nd
2011, 
amending the DM 30125 (22.12.2009) on the management requirements for the access to 
the rural development programme funds. Those buffer strips are defined according to Annex 
III of the Council Regulation (EC) 73/2009 for protecting water (Figure 34).  
The standard 5.2 states that 5-m buffer strips have to be created along rivers, streams and 
ditches. The administrative region can authorise a reduction to:  
3 m if the water body quality status is sufficient or good; and  
0 m if the water body quality status is high. 
Fertilisation  and  tillage  are forbidden in the buffer zone.  Tillage  is  allowed only  when 
necessary to maintain the effectiveness of the VFS. In the case of orchards or vineyards with 
integrated pest management or organic management, and when the water quality status is 
good or high, the restriction regarding fertiliser use is reduced from 5 to 3 m.  
The Health Ministry via the Plant Protection Product Committee (Commissione Consultiva 
per i Prodotti Fitosanitari) proposed in 2009 the introduction of VFS in order to address the 
request of the Directive 2009/128/EC concerning the sustainable use of pesticides. In this 
document, two definitions are given: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested