Appendices 
Recommended NWSRS Segment Classification and Land Ownership:  Once 
determined eligible, river segments are tentatively classified for study as wild, scenic, or 
recreational, based on the degree of access and amount of development along the river area.  If 
Congress designates a river or segment, the enabling legislation generally specifies the 
classification. 
Table F-1  
Summary of River Segment Eligibility and Recommended Classifications
RIVER REACH 
LENGTH 
COMMENTS 
Mojave Forks Dam to Spring Valley 
Lake 
11 miles 
Not eligible – no free flowing water. 
Public land limited to two parcels totaling 0.375 miles. 
Spring Valley Lake to Interstate 15 
bridge 
3.5 miles 
No determination.  No public land. 
Interstate 15 bridge to Oro Grande 
4.5 miles 
No determination.  No public land. 
Oro Grande to Helendale 
10 miles 
No determination.  No public land. 
Helendale to Barstow 
19 miles 
Not eligible – no free flowing water. 
Public land limited to 2.25 miles in three parcels. 
Barstow to Harvard Road crossing 
22 miles 
Not eligible – no free flowing water. 
Public land on 8.0 miles in 5 separate parcels. 
Harvard Road crossing to Basin 
Road 
22.5 miles  Eligible in part.  Free flowing water for 2.9 miles. 
Recommended classification of “Recreational” for this 
segment.  Outstanding remarkable scenic, geologic, 
recreational, wildlife, cultural and historic values. Public land 
limited to 14 miles in this reach.  Seven miles are within 
Afton Canyon ACEC and one mile is within Manix ACEC. 
Basin Road to Soda Lake (Mojave 
National Preserve) 
8 miles 
Not eligible – no free flowing water.   
Public land covers 7 river miles within Rasor Open Area. 
Table F-2 
Comparison of Outstanding Remarkable Values for 
Public Land River Segments of the Mojave River
RIVER 
SEGMENT - 
PUBLIC LAND 
FREE 
FLOW 
SCE-
NIC 
REC 
GEOLO-
GIC 
FISH 
WILD-
LIFE 
HISTO-
RIC 
CULT-
URAL 
ELIGIBL
WSR 
Mojave Forks 
Dam to Spring 
Valley Lake 
0.375 miles 
No 
No 
Helendale to 
Barstow 
2.25 miles 
No 
3-4 
No 
Barstow to 
Harvard Road 
crossing 
8 miles 
No 
No 
Harvard Road 
crossing to 
Yes 
Yes 
Pdf searchable text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf reader; how to select text in pdf image
Pdf searchable text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf searchable text; select text in pdf file
Appendices 
RIVER 
SEGMENT - 
PUBLIC LAND 
FREE 
FLOW 
SCE-
NIC 
REC 
GEOLO-
GIC 
FISH 
WILD-
LIFE 
HISTO-
RIC 
CULT-
URAL 
ELIGIBL
WSR 
Basin Road 
14 miles 
Basin Road to 
Soda Lake 
(Mojave 
National 
Preserve) 
7 miles 
No 
No 
The following segment of the Mojave River has been found eligible because it is free flowing and 
possess at least one outstanding remarkable value: 2.9 miles within the Afton Canyon ACEC. 
Key to Ratings:  
0 – None 
1 – Exemplary, one of the better examples of that type of resource at a national level 
2 – Unique, a resource or combination of resources that are regionally one of a kind 
3 – High quality at a regional and /or local level 
4 – A common resource at the regional and/or local level
Outstanding Remarkable Values:  The segment identified as eligible on public lands 
contains Outstandingly Remarkable Scenic Values (ORVs), i.e., Class “A” scenic quality, per 
BLM Manual guidelines.  Public lands in this segment have been previously designated as an 
Area of Critical Environmental Concern in part because of spectacular scenery.  Regionally rare 
plant communities such as Cottonwood-Willow Riparian Forest, Willow Riparian Scrub, 
Mesquite Bosque, as well as alkaline meadow, and emergent plant communities can also be 
found along this portion of the river.  Wildlife supported by these plant communities includes a 
high percentage of neotropical migrant birds and local or regional disjuncts.  The threatened 
desert tortoise occurs near this segment, as well as a host of sensitive and/or special concern 
species.  The presence of flowing water in this segment has served to attract humans for 
thousands of years.  The high relief, stark topography and lush riparian vegetation provided by 
this segment continue to offer many opportunities for non-intrusive recreation.  Table F-2 
documents the comparative assessment of ORVs by river segment.  ORVs for the eligible 
portion of the Mojave River follow. 
Wildlife and Plants:  Vegetation in the eligible segment consists of riparian plant 
communities, including Cottonwood-Willow Riparian Forest, Willow Scrub and introduces 
tamarisk thickets.  Drier portions of the river adjacent too the flowing water support Mesquite 
Bosque.  Invasive tamarisk has been removed as part of a restoration program by BLM over the 
past twelve years, and large numbers of willows and cottonwoods are replacing former tamarisk 
thickets.  Exclusion of cattle from the riparian area has assisted with the riparian restoration 
effort. 
The riparian zone serves as a major stopover point for neotropical birds, and is utilized as 
nesting habitat for a variety of species.  180 bird species have been recorded from Afton Canyon, 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
text searchable pdf; search text in pdf using java
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
find and replace text in pdf file; pdf text search tool
Appendices 
including disjunct occurrences of yellow warbler, vermilion flycatcher, summer tanager and 
yellow-breasted chat.  The surrounding mountains support nesting golden eagles and prairie 
falcons and a number of other nesting and wintering raptors have been recorded. 
Unusual reptiles in Afton Canyon include the easternmost occurrence of the southwestern 
pond turtle, desert tortoises in the adjacent creosote bush scrub and Mojave fringe-toed lizards in 
nearby blowsand deposits.  Several species snakes and lizards are present, making Afton Canyon 
an area of high reptilian diversity. 
Three species of fish have been recorded: black bullhead, flathead minnow and arroyo 
chub.  These fish have displaced the native Mojave tui chub, an endangered species.  The 
Mojave tui chub could be re-introduced at Afton Canyon, but several major problems would 
have to be overcome.  These include removal of non-native fish and predators, prevention of 
hybridization with the arroyo chub, storm proofing of a refugium site, and maintenance of water 
levels.  The Department of Fish and Game and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service consider re-
introduction of the Mojave tui chub into the Mojave River to be infeasible at this time.  
However, Afton Canyon appears to provide a re-introduction site with a high potential for 
success compared to other locations along the river. 
Bighorn sheep are present in the Cady Mountains, and Afton Canyon provides a reliable 
water source for these animals.  Other larger desert mammals, primarily predators, utilize the 
water as well. 
Geologic:  This segment of the Mojave River presents a spectacular landscape of 
badlands with an exposed multicolored stratigraphy.  The Pleistocene drainage of Lake Manix 
about 19,000 years ago sent water down the river to cause downcutting and erosion through lake 
and pre-lake sediments as well as the fanglomerate in Afton Canyon.  The Manix fault is an 
important structural geologic feature of the area. 
A fossil assemblage of Rancholabrean age occurs in the area, and fragmentary remains 
have been found of dire wolf, mammoth, sabre-toothed cat, bison, antelope and horses. 
Cultural:  Prehistoric sites along the Afton Canyon segment indicate an intermittent or 
continuing occupation by indigenous peoples for over 12,000 years. These sites include quarry 
sites, lithic scatter, ground stone artifacts, a possible cave site and six occupation or multi-use 
sites.  Afton Canyon was part of a prehistoric trade route across the Mojave Desert and was a 
significant “way station”.  The canyon was part of the Serrano Indians traditional resource area, 
near the boundary of the Chemehuevi territory. 
Historic:  The Mojave Road was a major historic trade and migration route.  Jedidiah 
Smith, Kit Carson and John C. Fremont traveled through the canyon in the early 1800s and 
recommended it as a route.  One mining operation in the hills adjoining the riparian segment has 
been in operation since the 1930s. 
Recreational:  Afton Canyon is one of the most heavily used recreation areas of the 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
keeping original layout. VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
can't select text in pdf file; make pdf text searchable
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
for VB.NET provides users fast and accurate image recognition function, which converts scanned images into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD
converting pdf to searchable text format; search text in pdf image
Appendices 
California desert.  The area is used by OHV enthusiasts, equestrians, rockhounds, campers, 
picnickers, hikers, hunters and birdwatchers.  BLM campgrounds facilitate use of the canyon and 
adjacent lands.  Scientific and educational use of the area by colleges and universities is also 
common.   The Mojave Road is an important historic and recreation feature attracting a high 
number of users. 
Wilderness:  No designated wilderness is found in the eligible river segment, but the adjacent 
Cady  Mountains are designated  as a Wilderness Study Area  and have been included in current 
Congressional legislation for wilderness status. 
References 
Bilhorn, Thomas W.  1993.  Mojave River Riparian Vegetation Existing in 1993.  Maps prepared 
for the California Department of Fish and Game, Sacramento, CA. 
Lines, Gregory C. and T. W. Bilhorn 1996.  Riparian Vegetation and Its Water Use During 1995 
Along the Mojave River, Southern California.  U. S.Geological Survey, Water Resources 
Investigations Report 96-4241, Sacramento, CA.  Available from Mojave Water Agency, 
Apple Valley, CA. 
Tierra Madre Consultants, 1992.  Natural Resources Inventory of the Mojave River Corridor.  
Report prepared for City of Victorville, Victorville, CA.  Includes “Cultural Resources 
Sensitivity Study of the Mojave River Corridor, San Bernardino County, California” by the 
Archaeological Research Unit, University of California, Riverside, CA. 
U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1997.  Mojave River Floodplain Maintenance Plan.  Corps of 
Engineers, Los Angeles District, Los Angeles, CA. 
U. S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1989.  Management Plan for the Afton 
Canyon Natural Area.  BLM, Barstow Field Office, Barstow, CA.
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications. C#.NET PDF Document Drawing Application.
pdf make text searchable; pdf searchable text converter
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
pdf text select tool; pdf select text
Appendices 
Management Standards and Guidelines for National Wild and Scenic Rivers  
The Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Public Law 90-542, as amended) established a method of 
providing Federal protection for certain of our remaining free-flowing rivers, and preserving 
these locales for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.  Such designated rivers 
benefit from the protective management that the act provides.   
Section 10(a) of the WSR Act states: 
Each component of the NWSRS shall be administered in such a manner as to 
protect and enhance the values which caused it to be included in said system 
without, insofar as is consistent therewith, limiting other uses that do not 
substantially interfere with public use and enjoyment of these values.  In such 
administration, primary emphasis shall be given to protecting its esthetic, scenic, 
historic, archaeologic, and scientific features.  Management plans for any such 
component may establish varying degrees of intensity for its protection and 
development, based on the special attributes of the area. 
This section is generally interpreted by the Secretary of the Interior as a stated non-degradation 
and enhancement policy for all designated river areas, regardless of classification.  
The following National Standards and Guidelines are summarized from BLM Manual 8351 
[Wild and Scenic Rivers-Policy and Program Direction for Identification, Evaluation and 
Management (1992)].  These standards/guidelines are intended to apply to formally designated 
rivers through incorporation into, or amendment of, resource or land use management plans.  
Incorporation or amendment efforts are typically completed within three years of formal WSR 
designation.  However, these guidelines also apply, on an interim basis, as described above.  For 
the sake of clarity, guidelines are presented for each separate river classification (wild, scenic 
and recreational).     
Wild River Areas 
The WSR Act defines wild river areas to include; “those rivers or sections of rivers that 
are free of impoundments and generally inaccessible except by trail, with watersheds and 
shorelines essentially primitive and waters unpolluted.  These represent vestiges of primitive 
America.” 
Wild river areas are to be managed with a primary objective of providing primary emphasis to 
protection of identified outstandingly remarkable values, while providing consistent, river-
related, outdoor recreation opportunities in a primitive setting. 
Where National Management Standards/Guidelines include allowable practices such as 
construction of minor structures related to wildlife habitat enhancement, protection from fire, 
and rehabilitation or stabilization of damaged resources, provided the area will remain natural 
looking and the practices or structures will harmonize with the environment.  Developments such 
as trails, bridges, occasional fencing, natural-appearing water diversions, ditches and water 
management devices, may be permitted if they are unobtrusive and do not have a significant, 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi empowered to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
find text in pdf files; cannot select text in pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
how to search text in pdf document; pdf text search
Appendices 
adverse impact on the natural character of the river area.  The following Wild River Program 
Management Standards apply:      
Forestry Practices 
Cutting of trees not permitted except when needed in association with a primitive 
recreation experience (such as clearing trails, for visitor safety purposes, or for fire control).  
Timber outside the boundary, but within visual corridors, should where feasible, be managed and 
harvested in a manner designed to provide special emphasis on visual quality.     
Water Quality 
Conditions will be maintained or improved to meet Federal criteria or federally approved 
State Standards.  River management plans shall prescribe a process for monitoring water quality 
on a scheduled basis. 
Hydroelectric Power and Water Resource Development 
No such development would be permitted in the channel or river corridor.  All water 
supply dams and major diversions are prohibited.  The natural appearance and essentially 
primitive character of the river area must be maintained.  Federal agency groundwater 
development for range, wildlife, recreation or administrative facilities may be permitted if there 
are no adverse effects on ORVs.  
Mining 
New mining claims and mineral leases are prohibited within 0.25 mile of the river.  Valid 
existing claims would not be abrogated and, subject to existing regulations, e.g., 43 CFR 3809, 
and any future regulations the Secretary of the Interior may prescribe to protect the rivers 
included in the NWSRS, existing mining activity would be allowed to continue.  All mineral 
activity on federally administered land must be conducted in a manner that minimizes surface 
disturbance, water sedimentation, pollution and visual impairment.  Reasonable mining claim 
and mineral lease access will be permitted.  Mining claims beyond 0.25 mile of the river, but 
within the wild river boundary, and perfected after the effective date of designation, can be 
patented only as to the mineral estate and not the surface estate.  
Road and Trail Construction 
No new roads or other provisions for overland motorized travel would be permitted 
within a narrow incised river valley or, if the river valley is broad, within 0.25 mile of the river 
bank.  A few inconspicuous roads leading to the boundary of the river area and unobtrusive trail 
bridges may be permitted. 
Agricultural Practices and Livestock Grazing 
Agricultural use is restricted to a limited amount of domestic livestock grazing and hay 
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Free .NET library for
how to select text in pdf and copy; search multiple pdf files for text
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
how to search pdf files for text; search pdf documents for text
Appendices 
production to the extent currently being practiced.  Row crops are prohibited. 
Recreation Facilities 
Major public use areas, such as campgrounds, interpretive centers, or administrative 
headquarters are located outside of wild river areas.  Simple comfort and convenience facilities, 
such as toilets, tables, fireplaces, shelters and refuse containers may be provided as necessary 
within the river area.  These should harmonize with the surroundings.  Unobtrusive hiking and 
equestrian trail bridges could be allowed on tributaries, but would not normally cross the 
designated river.  
Public Use and Access 
Recreational use including, but not limited to, hiking, fishing, hunting and boating is 
encouraged in wild river areas to the extent consistent with the protection of the river 
environment.  Public use and access may be regulated and distributed where necessary to protect 
and enhance wild river values. 
Rights-of-Way 
New transmission lines, natural gas lines, water lines, etc., are discouraged unless 
specifically prohibited outright by other plans, orders or laws.  Where no reasonable alternative 
exits, additional or new facilities should be restricted to existing rights-of-way.  Where new 
rights-of-way are unavoidable, locations and construction techniques will be selected to 
minimize adverse effects on wild river area-related values and fully evaluated during the site 
selection process.  
Motorized Travel 
Although this use can be permitted, it is generally not compatible with this river 
classification.  Normally, motorized use will be prohibited in a wild river area.  Prescriptions for 
management of motorized use may allow for search and rescue/emergency situations.  
Scenic River Areas 
The WSR Act defines scenic river areas to include “those rivers or sections of rivers that 
are free of impoundments, with shorelines or watersheds still largely primitive and shorelines 
largely undeveloped, but accessible in places by roads.” 
Scenic river areas are to be managed with a primary objective of maintaining and 
providing outdoor recreation opportunities in a near-natural setting.  The basic distinctions 
between “wild” and “scenic” classifications, involve varying degrees of development, types of 
land use, and road accessibility.  In general, a wide range of agricultural, water management, 
silvicultural and other practices could be compatible with scenic classification values, providing 
such practices are carried out in a manner not resulting in a substantial adverse effect on the river 
and its immediate environment.      
Appendices 
National Management Standards/Guidelines include the same considerations set forth for 
wild rivers, except that motorized vehicle use may in some cases be appropriate and that 
development of larger scale public-use facilities within the river area, such as moderate-sized 
campgrounds, interpretive centers, or administrative headquarters would be compatible, if such 
facilities were screened from the river.  The following Scenic River Program Management 
Standards apply: 
Forestry Practices 
Silvicultural practices, including timber harvesting could be allowed, provided that such 
practices are carried out in such a way that there is no substantial adverse effect on the river and 
its immediate environment.  The river should be maintained in its near-natural condition.   
Timber outside the boundary, but within the visual screen area, should be managed and 
harvested in a manner designed to provide special emphasis on visual quality.  Preferably, 
reestablishment of tree cover would be through natural revegetation.  Cutting of dead and down 
materials for fuelwood will be limited.  Where necessary, restrictions on the use of wood for fuel 
may be prescribed.    
Water Quality 
Conditions will be maintained or improved to meet Federal criteria or federally approved 
State Standards.  River management plans shall prescribe a process for monitoring water quality 
on a scheduled basis. 
Hydroelectric Power and Water Resource Development 
No such development would be permitted in the channel or river corridor.  Flood control 
dams and levees would be prohibited. All water supply dams and major diversions are 
prohibited.  Maintenance of existing facilities and construction of some new structures would be 
permitted, provided that the area remains natural in appearance and the practices or structures 
harmonize with the surrounding environment. 
Mining 
Subject to existing regulations, e.g. 43 CFR 3809, and any future regulations the 
Secretary of the Interior may prescribe to protect the rivers included in the NWSRS, new mining 
claims and mineral leases can be allowed.  All mineral activity on federally administered land 
must be conducted in a manner that minimizes surface disturbance, water sedimentation, 
pollution and visual impairment.  Reasonable mining claim and mineral lease access will be 
permitted.  Mining claims within the wild river boundary, and perfected after the effective date 
of designation, can be patented only as to the mineral estate and not the surface estate.  
Road and Trail Construction 
Roads may occasionally bridge the river and short stretches of conspicuous or lengthy 
Appendices 
stretches of inconspicuous and well-screened roads would be allowed.  Maintenance of existing 
roads and any new roads will be based on the type of use for which the roads are constructed and 
the type of use that will occur in the river area. 
Agricultural Practices and Livestock Grazing 
In comparison to wild river areas, a wider range of agricultural and livestock grazing uses 
are permitted, to the extent currently being practiced.  Row crops are not considered as much of 
an intrusion of the “largely primitive” nature of scenic corridors, as long as there is not a 
substantial adverse effect on the natural-like appearance of the river area. 
Recreation Facilities 
Larger-scale public use areas, such as moderate-sized campgrounds, interpretive centers, 
or administrative headquarters, are allowed if such facilities are screened from the river. 
Public Use and Access 
Recreational use including, but not limited to, hiking, fishing, hunting and boating is 
encouraged in scenic river areas to the extent consistent with the protection of the river 
environment.  Public use and access may be regulated and distributed where necessary to protect 
and enhance scenic river values. 
Rights-of-Way 
New transmission lines, natural gas lines, water lines, etc., are discouraged unless 
specifically prohibited outright by other plans, orders or laws.  Where no reasonable alternative 
exits, additional or new facilities should be restricted to existing rights-of-way.  Where new 
rights-of-way are unavoidable, locations and construction techniques will be selected to 
minimize adverse effects on scenic river area-related values and fully evaluated during the site 
selection process.  
Motorized Travel 
This use, on land or water, could be permitted, prohibited or restricted to protect river 
values.  Prescriptions for management of motorized use may allow for search and 
rescue/emergency situations.  
Recreational River Areas 
The WSR Act defines recreational river areas to include “those rivers or sections of rivers 
that are readily accessible by road or railroad, that may have some development along their 
shorelines, that may have undergone some development along their shorelines, and that may 
have undergone some impoundment or diversion in the past.” 
Appendices 
Recreational river areas are to be managed with an objective of protecting and enhancing 
existing recreational values.  The primary objective is to provide opportunities for the public to 
participate in recreation activities dependent on, or enhanced by, the largely free-flowing nature 
of the river. 
National Management Standards/Guidelines include allowable practices such as 
construction of recreation facilities in proximity to the river, although recreational river 
classification does not require extensive recreational developments.  Such facilities are still to be 
kept to a minimum, with visitor services provided outside the river area.  Future construction of 
impoundments, diversions, straightening, riprapping and other modification of the water way or 
adjacent lands would not be permitted, except where such developments would not have a direct 
and adverse effect on the river and its immediate environment.  The following Recreational 
River Program Management Standards apply: 
Forestry Practices 
Silvicultural practices, including timber harvesting could be allowed under standard 
restrictions to avoid adverse effects on the river environment and its associated values.  
Water Quality 
Conditions will be maintained or improved to meet Federal criteria or federally approved 
State Standards.  River management plans shall prescribe a process for monitoring water quality 
on a scheduled basis. 
Hydroelectric Power and Water Resource Development 
No such development would be permitted in the channel or river corridor.  Existing low 
dams, diversion works, riprap and other minor structures may be maintained, provided the 
waterway remains generally natural in appearance. New structures may be allowed, provided 
that the area remains natural in appearance and the practices or structures harmonize with the 
surrounding environment. 
Mining  
Subject to existing regulations, e.g. 43 CFR 3809, and any future regulations the 
Secretary of the Interior may prescribe to protect the rivers included in the NWSRS, new mining 
claims and mineral leases can be allowed.  All mineral activity on federally administered land 
must be conducted in a manner that minimizes surface disturbance, water sedimentation, 
pollution and visual impairment.  Reasonable mining claim and mineral lease access will be 
permitted.  Mining claims within the wild river area boundary perfected after the effective date 
of designation can be patented only as to the mineral estate and not the surface estate.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested