how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : Converting pdf to searchable text format software control dll windows web page wpf web forms Vol-2-Complete-Bookmarks21-part2006

29
the results of the burrow counts.  However, unlike burrow counts, Area 12 had a much lower scat 
count ranking, and was only higher than 4 other sites.  Areas 6 and 17, had low scat counts, 
paralleling their lower burrow counts.  Area 1 had a higher ranking with scat counts than burrow 
counts. 
Area 11 with its high counts of both burrows and scats dominated all other sites in TCS.  Areas 
18 and 4 with high scat counts were the next highest in TCS.  The next highest TCS Areas were 
13, 10, and 12.  Area 13 had high scat counts, Area 12 had high burrow counts, while Area10 
had both.  Areas 6 and 17, on the basis of low burrow and scat counts had the lowest TCS. 
The statistical significance of live tortoise and carcasses among Areas is very difficult to assess 
because of very small sample sizes.  Interestingly, the only significant comparison with tortoises 
was that the “unknown” Area was higher than Areas 7 and 8.  Possibly no tortoises were seen in 
these Areas.  All three of these Areas were neither among the highest nor the lowest in sign 
count.  Small sample sizes make interpretation tenuous. 
Area 17 demonstrated an unusually low carcass count.  This Area was also among the lowest in 
both burrow and scat counts.  This data suggests that the low carcass counts are paralleling a low 
density of tortoises.     
1999 
There were 9 Areas surveyed in 1999.  The “unknown” category included many data cases, and 
therefore, may have consisted of several individual survey Areas.  Additionally, a number of 
cases lacked an Area designation.  All these cases were not included in the analysis. 
Areas 1 and 7 had more burrow counts than Areas 9 and 10.  Area 1 also had more burrow 
counts than Area 5. 
Scat counts and TCS paralleled each other closely and statistically separated the nine Areas to a 
much greater extent than burrow counts.  As in the case of the 1998 data, at this point in the 
analysis it is not known if this is a sensitive measure for Area separation or if the scat merely 
represent extraneous “noise” in the system.  Area 1 also had the highest scat/TCS counts, but scat 
counts were not particularly high at Area 7.  Area 9 demonstrated particularly lower scat/TCS 
counts that all the other Areas. 
Tortoises were higher at Area 5 than at Areas 4 and 9.  Area 5 was not particularly high in sign 
count, but did have significantly higher scat/TCS than 4 and 9, but not burrow counts.  Small 
sample sizes make interpretation tenuous.  
Area 10 and to a smaller degree Area 8 showed lower carcass counts.  Although Area 10 also 
possessed low burrow counts, Areas 10 and 8 it did not have particularly reduced scat/TCS.  
Small sample sizes make interpretation tenuous. 
Desert Tortoises and Their Sign 
Desert tortoises should be closely associated with their sign – burrows and scats.  Desert tortoises 
possess relatively small home ranges even in highly productive years (averaging < 8 ha), and this 
Converting pdf to searchable text format - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf; pdf find text
Converting pdf to searchable text format - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
convert pdf to word searchable text; convert pdf to searchable text
30
home range dramatically decreases even further in a drought year (averaging < 3 ha) (Duda et al. 
1999).  Within their home range they build burrows, using 2-11/tortoise in a productive and 1-6 
in a drought year (Duda et al. 1999) and deposit scats at a rate that is at least an order of 
magnitude greater than their burrow numbers (Krzysik, in review).  Based on their dedication to 
small home ranges, and because tortoises spend a major portion of their lives in burrows, 
particularly in drought years and bad weather (Duda and Krzysik 1998), it is intuitive that 
tortoise sign represents a surrogate for actual live tortoises.  Traditional desert tortoise surveys 
have summed burrow counts and “independent” scat counts to produce TCS, total corrected sign. 
Conclusions 
The data presented here and other evidence suggests that tortoise burrows appear to be a better 
surrogate for comparisons of tortoise distribution and relative abundance patterns than either 
scats or TCS.  TCS was strongly correlated with scat counts, and essentially did not provide 
additional statistical information.  However, TCS was useful when comparing and contrasting 
surveyors, because at least in some cases it tended to “average” individual surveyor’s variability 
in burrow and scat counts.  The data presented here demonstrate that surveyors are more similar 
to each other in burrow counts than they are in scat counts.  The data also show that scat counts 
are much more variable than burrow counts, both within and between specific statistical 
comparisons.  Importantly, burrow counts along the standard triangular tortoise survey transects 
(10 yards wide) accurately represent actual burrow density estimates, because the effective 
survey width using Distance Sampling surveys is equal to 4.5 m on a side (Krzysik, in review).  
Effective survey width for scats is approximately 1 m on a side.  Therefore, burrow counts on 10 
yard wide transects directly represent burrow density, while scat counts are relative numbers at 
best, and cannot be used as density estimates.  Effective survey width is equal to half the width 
of survey transects when all survey objects are detected (Buckland et al. 1993). 
As a general statement, experienced surveyors are reasonably similar in their tortoise sign counts 
along transects.  Individual exceptions can be found for specific years, Areas, inexperienced 
surveyors, and other circumstances, but the overall variability of sign counts both within and 
between comparisons may override innate differences among individuals for object detection.  
Training sessions are recommended to standardize the correct identification of tortoise burrows 
and the classification of their “condition”.  The counting of tortoise burrows that are collapsed or 
in poor condition should be standardized among all surveyors before actualsurveys are 
conducted.  
The next phase of this project should include the following tasks by our team. 
Ed LaRue and I need to get together to spatially identify the specific survey Areas coded  
in all the data sets. 
We need to associate UTM coordinates with individual survey transects.  Much of this is 
already accomplished, but requires checking for consistency and accuracy.  
Survey Areas require further delineation in the 1999 and 2001 data sets. 
All other potential analyses of the current data will be discussed with Ed LaRue.      
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file C# programming sample for PDF to text converting.
search multiple pdf files for text; find text in pdf image
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical makes PDF document visible and searchable on the a C# programming example for converting PDF to HTML
pdf text search tool; how to make a pdf document text searchable
31
All data sets should be rechecked for field data accuracy.  Should all the data or only 
random spot-checking be done? 
Distance Sampling data will be analyzed (not yet available) (AJK). 
2002 data will be analyzed (not yet available) (AJK). 
References 
Buckland, S.T., D.R. Anderson, K.P. Burnham, and J.L. Laake.  1993.  Distance Sampling: 
Estimating Abundances of Biological Populations.  Chapman and Hall, New York, NY.  446pp. 
Day, R.W., and G.P. Quinn.  1989.  Comparisons of treatments after an analysis of variance in 
ecology.  Ecological Monographs  59:433-463. 
Duda, J.J., and A.J. Krzysik.  1998.  Radiotelemetry study of a desert tortoise population: Sand 
Hill Training Area, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California.  
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USACERL Technical Report 98/39.  75pp.  
Duda, J.J., A.J. Krzysik, and J.E. Freilich.  1999.  Effects of drought on desert tortoise movement 
and activity.  Journal of Wildlife Management  63:1181-1192.   
Fry, J.C.  1993.  One-way analysis of variance.  Pages 3-39 in Biological Data Analysis: A 
Practical Approach, J.C. Fry, ed.  Oxford University Press, New York, NY.  418pp. 
Green, R.H.  1979.  Sampling Design and Statistical Methods for Environmental Biologists.  
John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY.  257pp. 
Harris, R.J.  1975.  A Primer of Multivariate Statistics.  Academic Press, New York, NY.  332pp. 
Johnson, D.H.  1995.  Statistical sirens: The allure of nonparametrics.  Ecology  76:1998-2000.  
Krzysik, A.J.  1998.  Ecological design and analysis: Principles and issues in environmental 
monitoring.  Pages 385-403 in Status and Conservation of Midwestern Amphibians, M.J. 
Lannoo, ed.  University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, IA.  507pp. 
Krzysik, A.J.  A landscape sampling protocol for estimating distribution and density patterns of 
desert tortoises at multiple spatial scales.  Invited Paper.  In Review, ΑChelonian Conservation 
and Biology≅. 
Krzysik, A.J., and A.P. Woodman.  1991.  Six years of Army training activities and the desert 
tortoise.  The Desert Tortoise Council Symposia  1987-1991:337-368. 
Levene, H.  1960.  Robust tests for equality of variance.  Pages 278-292 in Contributions to 
Probability and Statistics, I. Olkin, ed.  Stanford University Press, Palo Alto, CA.     
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
viewed and edited by converting documents and on artificial intelligence to extract text from documents and Texts will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT
search pdf documents for text; how to make pdf text searchable
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
VB.NET PDF Converter SDK for Converting PDF to HTML Webpage is that compared with HTML file, PDF file (a not be easily edited), is less searchable for search
how to select all text in pdf; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
32
Milliken, G.A., and D.E. Johnson.  1984.  Analysis of Messy Data.  Volume I: Designed 
Experiments.  Wadsworth, Belmont, CA.  473pp. 
Morgan, G.A., and O.V. Griego.  1998.  Easy Use and Interpretation of SPSS for Windows: 
Answering Research Questions with Statistics.  Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ.  276pp. 
Potvin, C., and D.A. Roff.  1993.  Distribution-free and robust statistical methods: Viable 
alternatives to parametric statistics.  Ecology  74:1617-1628.     
Shaw, R.G., and T. Mitchell-Olds.  1993.  ANOVA for unbalanced data: An overview.  Ecology  
74:1638-1645. 
Smith, S.M.  1995.  Distribution-free and robust statistical methods: Viable alternatives to 
parametric statistics?  Ecology  76:1997-1998. 
Snedecor, G.W., and W.G. Cochran.  1989.  Statistical Methods, 8
th
ed.  Iowa State University 
Press, Ames, IA.  503pp.  
Sokal, R.R, and F.J. Rohlf.  1995.  Biometry, 3
rd
ed.  W.H. Freeman, New York, NY.  887pp. 
SPSSa.  1999.  SPSS analysis software package.  Version 9.0.1  SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL. 
SPSSb.  1999.  SPSS User’s Guide, Version 9.0.  SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL.  740pp.     
Stewart-Oaten, A.  1995.  Rules and judgments in statistics: Three examples.  Ecology  76:2001-
2009.     
Underwood, A.J.  1997.  Experiments in Ecology.  Cambridge University Press, New York, NY.  
504pp. 
Zar, J.H.  1999.  Biostatistical Analysis, 4
th
ed.  Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.  663pp. 
Zolman, J.F.  1993.  Biostatistics: Experimental Design and Statistical Inference.  Oxford 
University Press, New York, NY.  343pp. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without that compared to PDF document format, Word file This is an example for converting PDF to Word
pdf search and replace text; how to select all text in pdf file
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# programming .
how to select text in a pdf; text select tool pdf
33
Tables 
Table 1.  Calibration Plot Areas 
Code Name for Analysis
Complete Name
Alvord  
Alvord 6 
DTNA1 
DTNA Interior 
DTNA2 
DTNA Interp Inside 
Freemont 
Fremont Peak 
Johnson 
Johnson Valley 
Kramer  
Kramer Hills 
Liz   
Liz C 
Lucerne 
Lucerne Valley, Lucerne 2 
VB.NET Word: .NET Word to SVG Converter Control; Convert Word to
an editable image format) can be more searchable for Google The converting process is not complicated: open a Word For instance, this VB.NET PDF to SVG library
search text in multiple pdf; pdf text select tool
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Online demo allows converting tiff to PDF online. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.TIFF.dll
convert pdf to searchable text online; cannot select text in pdf file
34
Table 2.  Data matrix for Calibration Plot Areas.  X indicates survey.  
Surveyor 
Alvord  Fremont  Kramer
Liz  Lucerne DTNA1  DTNA2  Johnson
1998 
Boland 
Larue 
Vaughn 
Frank 
Karl 
Woodman 
Goodlett 
Hoover 
Keaton 
Laberteaux 
Silverman 
Smith 
Wood P  
1999 
Boland 
Larue 
Vaughn 
Frank 
Karl 
Woodman 
Goodlett 
Hoover 
Keaton 
Laberteaux 
Silverman 
Smith 
Wood P 
2001 
Boland 
Larue 
Vaughn 
Frank 
Karl 
Woodman 
Goodlett 
Hoover 
Keaton 
Laberteaux 
Silverman 
Smith 
Wood P 
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical PowerPoint document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PowerPoint document
text searchable pdf file; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Besides, this Word converting library also makes Word document visible and searchable on the
pdf search and replace text; select text in pdf
35
Table 3.  Calibration Plot Areas surveyed by YEAR. 
1998 
1999 
2001 
ALVORD 
DTNA1 
DTNA2 
FREMONT 
JOHNSON 
KRAMER 
LIZ 
LUCERNE 
Table 4.  Surveyors at Calibration Plot Areas by YEAR. 
1998 
1999 
2001 
Boland 
Frank 
Goodlett 
Hoover 
Karl 
Keaton 
Laberteaux 
Larue 
Silverman 
Smith 
Vaughn 
Wood P 
Table 5.  Surveyors used at Calibration Plot Areas in multiple years. 
1998-1999   
Boland, Karl, Larue, Vaughn, Woodman  N=5 
1999-2001   
Boland, Frank, Larue, Vaughn 
N=4 
1991-2001   
Boland, Larue, Vaughn 
N=3 
Statistical Analysis of BLM Desert Tortoise Surveys 
In Support of the West Mojave Management Plan 
Report II: Statistical Comparison of DWMAs (1999 & 2001) 
19 June 2002 
by 
Anthony J. Krzysik, Ph.D. 
11 Highland Terrace 
Prescott, AZ  86305
2
Introduction 
This report represents the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Correlation Analysis, and Stepwise 
Linear Regression Analysis of the 1999 and 2001 data sets based on BLM’s “Desert Wildlife 
Management Areas” (DWMAs).  These data and analysis support the West Mojave Management 
Plan.  Ed LaRue of BLM is the primary monitor of this analysis effort and Principal Investigator 
of the role of desert populations in the development of this plan.  Kathy Buescher, Senior 
Wildlife Biologist at Chambers Group, Inc., is the subcontract manager. 
The data used for these specific analyses were developed by Ric Williams and Hubert Switalski, 
AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc. and sent to me 14 June for statistical analyses.  These data 
sets originally were sent to me by Emily Cohen, and I edited and modified them for statistical 
analysis.  However, the tortoise transect data lacked association with DWMAs, or any other 
specific landscape areas of management interest, although UTM coordinates were present.  I sent 
these data to Ric and Hubert and they developed the variable “NAME” which represented 
specific DWMAs.  The new data sets associated individual transect data with landscape specific 
DWMAs (Table 1).  The 1998 data set will be similarly associated with DWMAs in July. 
DWMA
Data Years
Fremont – Kramer   
1999, 2001   
Ord – Rodman  
1999, 2001 
Pinto Mountain 
1999 
Superior – Cronese    
1999, 2001 
Table 1.  
DWMAs and YEARS compared in this report. 
Methods 
Data analyses were conducted with the SPSS statistical package (SPSS 1999a).  Four tortoise 
sign counts were used in the analysis: burrows, scats, TCS, and carcasses.  The variable burrow 
is the actual observed tortoise burrow count on individual surveyed transects and was available 
from the data matrix.  The variable scat is the corrected tortoise scat count on individual 
surveyed transects, and was calculated from the data matrix as TCS – burrow.  Raw scat counts 
require to be “corrected” because some scats are found in clumps, which are treated as a “single 
count”.  The variable TCS (Total Corrected Sign) is the total burrow + corrected scat count on 
individual surveyed transects and was available from the data matrix.  The variable carcass is the 
observation of tortoise shells (carapace/plastron) or skeletal remains on the transect.  Survey 
transects were further classified by two variables based on their TCS values (Table 2). 
3
Classification A: 
Designation
TCS
Low   
< 7   
High   
> 6 
Classification B: 
Designation
TCS
0-1 
2-3 
4-6 
7-9 
> 9 
Table 2.
Classification of survey transects based on TCS values. 
Tortoise sign require square root data transformation, because the data represent counts with 
many data cells being “0”.  Counts follow a Poisson distribution where the mean equals the 
variance, and therefore the mean and variance cannot be independent, but vary identically. 
All the sign data was transformed as x = (x+0.5)
1/2
, where x represents a tortoise sign variable 
(Sokal and Rohlf 1995). 
Bivariate parametric and nonparametric correlation analyses were performed on the data sets to 
assess the association of live tortoises with: burrows, scats, TCS, and carcasses on survey 
transects.  The parametric test was the Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient.  Two 
nonparametric rank correlations were used: Spearman’s rho and Kendall’s tau.   
Guided by the results of the correlation analyses, a Stepwise Linear Regression model was 
developed to assess the relative importance of burrows, scats, and TCS to “predict” tortoise 
transect occurrences. 
Factorial Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to contrast years and DWMAs with respect 
to burrows, scats, TCS, live tortoises, and carcasses. 
Three major ANOVAs were performed to compare DWMAs: 
1)  The complete Factorial Analysis, using Years and DWMAs as factors 
2)  Analyzing Years separately 
3)  Analyzing High and Low TCS Classes separately 
Low TCS transects possessed 0 to 6 TCS 
High TCS transects possessed > 6 TCS 
The 5 percent significance level (P < 0.05) was used based on experience and general acceptance 
in ecological research and field biology.  Burrows, scats, TCS, tortoises, and carcasses were each 
used in separate analyses as dependent variables with year and DWMAs as “factors”, the 
independent variables.  The data sets are considered “unbalanced” in the complete ANOVA 
design, because empty cells are present in the years x DWMAs matrix (e.g., Pinto Mountain was 
not surveyed in 2001).  The complete Factorial ANOVA analyses used Type IV calculation of 
Sums of Squares, because this algorithm is generally recommended for data possessing empty 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested