14
Fremont – Kramer  >  Pinto Mtn.  (<0.001)   
Superior – Cronese  >  Ord – Rodman  (0.001) 
Summary: 
Carcass counts were statistically ranked as follows: 
Fremont – Kramer   =  Superior – Cronese  >  Ord – Rodman 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Pinto Mtn  =  Ord - Rodman  
Carcass counts were similar at and significantly more abundant at Fremont – Kramer and 
Superior – Cronese than at Ord – Rodman and Pinto Mtn., which were similar.     
TCS Class:  
High (> 6) 
DWMAs Compared: See Below 
Sample Sizes: 
DWMA
N
Fremont – Kramer    40 
Ord – Rodman  
12 
Superior – Cronese   102 
BURROWS 
Levene’s Test of Equality of Error Variances: 
Not Significant  (0.61)   
Difference among DWMAs:   
Significant  (0.018)   
Difference among DWMAs (Tamhane’s T2) 
Superior – Cronese  >  Fremont – Kramer  (0.023)   
Summary: 
Burrow counts were greater at Superior – Cronese than at Fremont – Kramer.  All other contrasts 
were similar.   
SCATS 
Levene’s Test of Equality of Error Variances: 
Not Significant  (0.23) 
Difference among DWMAs:   
Not Significant  (0.55)   
Pdf make text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
cannot select text in pdf file; make pdf text searchable
Pdf make text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to make a pdf document text searchable; pdf text search tool
15
Summary: 
Scat counts were similar at all DWMAs.  
TORTOISES 
Levene’s Test of Equality of Error Variances: 
Not Significant  (0.14)   
Difference among DWMAs:   
Not Significant  (0.63)   
A similar number of live tortoises were found at all DWMAs.   
CARCASSES 
Levene’s Test of Equality of Error Variances: 
Not Significant  (0.36) 
Difference among DWMAs:   
Not Significant  (0.94   
Summary: 
A similar number of carcasses were found at all DWMAs. 
Discussion 
Desert Tortoises and Their Sign 
Desert tortoises should be closely associated with their sign – burrows and scats.  Desert tortoises 
possess relatively small home ranges even in highly productive years (averaging < 8 ha), and this 
home range dramatically decreases even further in a drought year (averaging < 3 ha) (Duda et al. 
1999).  Within their home range they build burrows, using 2-11/tortoise in a productive and 1-6 
in a drought year (Duda et al. 1999) and deposit scats at a rate that is at least an order of 
magnitude greater than their burrow numbers (Krzysik, in review).  Based on their dedication to 
small home ranges, and because tortoises spend a major portion of their lives in burrows, 
particularly in drought years and bad weather (Duda and Krzysik 1998), it is intuitive that 
tortoise sign represents a surrogate for actual live tortoises.  Traditional desert tortoise surveys 
have summed burrow counts and “independent” scat counts to produce TCS, total corrected sign. 
Correlation and Stepwise Regression Analyses 
Despite the acknowledged difficulty of observing live desert tortoises on survey transects, and 
the very high variability of tortoise sign (burrows and scats) among transects, there was a highly 
significant correlation (P<0.01) of live tortoises with burrows, scats, and TCS for the total 
DWMA data set and in each of the two years (Table 3).  However, when the data were classified 
by the abundance of TCS, the results of the correlation analysis became interesting (Table 3).  
On transects with high (>6) TCS, only burrows were significantly correlated with live tortoises.  
When the TCS counts were further delineated into five classes (Table 3), burrows consistently 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
What should be noted here is that our PDF to text converting library Thus, please make sure you have installed VS 2005 or above versions and .NET Framework
how to make pdf text searchable; pdf find highlighted text
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp following sample codes demonstrate how to extract text from bmp of image file formats, so you can make all desired
find and replace text in pdf file; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
16
for all five classes were significantly correlated with tortoise counts, while scat counts and TCS 
were inconsistent and unreliable.  TCS were only correlated with tortoises at the two lowest TCS 
classes, undoubtedly reflecting the large sample sizes in these classes, and the positive influence 
of burrows being included with TCS.  Scat counts were very unreliable, and even demonstrated 
NEGATIVE significant correlations with tortoises with TCS classes of 2-3 and 7-9.  These 
results are very critical and interesting, because the majority of transects in any tortoise survey 
data set contain low sign counts, and high sample sizes may mask interesting details among 
gradients of sign densities.  As demonstrated in the ANOVA analyses, scat counts being more 
abundant than burrows dominate TCS, and parallel results are achieved with these two variables.  
However, in the correlation analysis inconsistent scat correlations across the TCS gradient, 
resulted in inconsistent TCS correlations.  These data provide compelling evidence that burrows 
are a more consistent and reliable surrogate for tortoise counts than scats or the combination of 
burrows + scats (TCS).  The current analysis extends and reinforces the similar conclusions 
reached in the last report (Krzysik 2002).  Additional transect data, as well as, additional 
analyses are required and will be conducted for the next report to further elucidate this 
interesting pattern. 
Carcass counts were not correlated with transect live tortoise counts.  A priori, everything else 
being equal, one would expect that DWMAs with higher tortoises densities would also possess 
higher carcass densities (a significant positive correlation), assuming mortality rates are similar.  
DWMAs that suffered higher tortoise mortality should show a negative correlation between live 
tortoises and carcasses.  The carcass data suggest that BOTH tortoise densities and tortoise 
mortality rates are similar at the DWMAs.             
Motivated by the significant correlation of tortoises with their sign, an exploratory Stepwise 
Linear Regression Model was developed to assess and statistically verify the relative importance 
of the three sign counts to predict tortoise occurrence.  This technique selects the best predictor 
variable that explains most of the scatter around the regression line.  Inherently, it eliminates 
redundant variables that possess high multicollinearity.  For example, TCS is a composite of the 
other two sign counts.  Traditionally, the validity and interpretation of stepwise techniques have 
been questioned (Green 1979).  However, there has recently been a revival in their applications.  
The result of this analysis clearly demonstrated that burrow counts were the only predictor 
variable necessary to explain the variability of tortoises on transects.  Statistically, scats and 
TCS did not contribute significant information to the regression.  As in the correlation analysis, 
Stepwise Linear Regression reinforces the validity in using burrow counts as a surrogate for 
tortoise counts. 
The data presented here and other evidence suggest that tortoise burrows appear to be a better 
surrogate for comparisons of tortoise distribution and relative abundance patterns than either 
scats or TCS.  TCS was strongly correlated with scat counts, and essentially did not provide 
additional statistical information.  The data also show that scat counts are much more variable 
than burrow counts, both within and between specific statistical comparisons.  Importantly, 
burrow counts along the standard triangular tortoise survey transects (10 yards wide) accurately 
represent actual burrow density estimates, because the effective survey width using Distance 
Sampling surveys is equal to 4.5 m on a side (Krzysik, in review).  Effective survey width for 
scats is approximately 1 m on a side.  Therefore, burrow counts on 10 yard wide transects 
directly represent burrow density, while scat counts are relative numbers at best, and cannot be 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a certain page to text and easily save Before you get started, please make sure that you have installed the
search pdf files for text programmatically; convert pdf to word searchable text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
We try to make it as easy as possible to Professional PDF to text converting library from RasterEdge PDF for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to
how to search text in pdf document; select text pdf file
17
used as density estimates.  Effective survey width is equal to half the width of survey transects 
when all survey objects are detected (Buckland et al. 1993). 
Analysis of Variance 
Burrow counts (densities) were similar at all DWMAs and for both 1999 and 2001.  
Interestingly, when only high (>6) TCS transects were analyzed, Superior – Cronese had higher 
burrow counts than Fremont – Kramer.  Pinto Mtn. did not have any high TCS transects. 
Scat and TCS counts produced similar results in ANOVA, because TCS is usually dominated by 
scat counts.  Therefore, scat counts were used for all analyses, with the exception of the complete 
Factorial ANOVA where TCS was also used.  Pinto Mtn. had lower scat counts than the other 
DWMAs in 1999, and when considering only Low TCS transects.  Pinto Mtn. was not 
represented in 2001 nor in high TCS transects.  In 2001, Superior – Cronese had higher scat 
counts than Fremont – Kramer.  However, when high TCS transects were analyzed all DWMAs 
had similar scat counts. 
Live tortoise counts were similar at all DWMAs, for both 1999 and 2001, and for both low and 
high TCS transects.  However, statistical interpretation can be quite tenuous, because of the high 
variability and low sample sizes associated with finding tortoises on survey transects. 
Carcass counts were highest at Fremont – Cramer and Superior – Cronese.  Depending on the 
specific comparisons, these two DWMAs were either similar or the former had higher carcass 
counts than the latter.  Ord – Rodman and Pinto Mtn. had lower carcass counts than the two 
above DWMAs, and they were similar to each other.  
Based on the available data and sample sizes, the four DWMAs appear to be similar to one 
another in their tortoise and sign counts, and therefore, of similar value as desert tortoise 
conservation areas.  Although there were some statistical differences with specific comparisons 
of scat and carcass counts, these parameters may not be important in elucidating actual tortoise 
densities.    Although the analyses could not demonstrate statistical differences among DWMAs 
with respect to live tortoise counts, the high variability and small sample sizes makes 
interpretation tenuous.  An interesting outcome of the ANOVA analyses was that burrow counts 
(i.e., densities) were higher at Superior – Cronese than at Fremont – Kramer for the high TCS 
transects.  This suggests that either Superior – Cronese tortoises possess a higher burrow/tortoise 
ratio, or tortoises are more abundant at this DWMA.  Further analyses are being planned and will 
be conducted to explore and further elucidate the patterns identified in this report. 
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that the PDF file cannot be
convert pdf to searchable text; how to search pdf files for text
OCR Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
page provides detailed information for recognizing text from scanned or doucments in Web Document Viewer, make sure that you Build, Save a Scannable PDF, PDF/A.
pdf make text searchable; how to select text on pdf
18
References 
Buckland, S.T., D.R. Anderson, K.P. Burnham, and J.L. Laake.  1993.  Distance Sampling: 
Estimating Abundances of Biological Populations.  Chapman and Hall, New York, NY.  446pp. 
Day, R.W., and G.P. Quinn.  1989.  Comparisons of treatments after an analysis of variance in 
ecology.  Ecological Monographs  59:433-463. 
Duda, J.J., and A.J. Krzysik.  1998.  Radiotelemetry study of a desert tortoise population: Sand 
Hill Training Area, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, California.  
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USACERL Technical Report 98/39.  75pp.  
Duda, J.J., A.J. Krzysik, and J.E. Freilich.  1999.  Effects of drought on desert tortoise movement 
and activity.  Journal of Wildlife Management  63:1181-1192.   
Fry, J.C.  1993.  One-way analysis of variance.  Pages 3-39 in Biological Data Analysis: A 
Practical Approach, J.C. Fry, ed.  Oxford University Press, New York, NY.  418pp. 
Green, R.H.  1979.  Sampling Design and Statistical Methods for Environmental Biologists.  
John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY.  257pp. 
Harris, R.J.  1975.  A Primer of Multivariate Statistics.  Academic Press, New York, NY.  332pp. 
Johnson, D.H.  1995.  Statistical sirens: The allure of nonparametrics.  Ecology  76:1998-2000.  
Krzysik, A.J.  1998.  Ecological design and analysis: Principles and issues in environmental 
monitoring.  Pages 385-403 in Status and Conservation of Midwestern Amphibians, M.J. 
Lannoo, ed.  University of Iowa Press, Iowa City, IA.  507pp. 
Krzysik, A.J.  2002.  Statistical analysis of BLM desert tortoise surveys in support of the West 
Mojave Management Plan.  Report I: Exploratory and initial data analysis.  1 May 2002.  35pp. 
Krzysik, A.J.  A landscape sampling protocol for estimating distribution and density patterns of 
desert tortoises at multiple spatial scales.  Invited Paper.  In Review, ΑChelonian Conservation 
and Biology≅. 
Levene, H.  1960.  Robust tests for equality of variance.  Pages 278-292 in Contributions to 
Probability and Statistics, I. Olkin, ed.  Stanford University Press, Palo Alto, CA.     
Milliken, G.A., and D.E. Johnson.  1984.  Analysis of Messy Data.  Volume I: Designed 
Experiments.  Wadsworth, Belmont, CA.  473pp. 
Morgan, G.A., and O.V. Griego.  1998.  Easy Use and Interpretation of SPSS for Windows: 
Answering Research Questions with Statistics.  Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ.  276pp. 
Potvin, C., and D.A. Roff.  1993.  Distribution-free and robust statistical methods: Viable 
alternatives to parametric statistics.  Ecology  74:1617-1628.     
VB.NET Image: Start with RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK in Visual
dll: With this dll, users are capable of recognizing text from scanned documents, images or existing PDF documents and creating searchable PDF-OCR in VB.NET.
pdf text searchable; how to make a pdf file text searchable
19
Shaw, R.G., and T. Mitchell-Olds.  1993.  ANOVA for unbalanced data: An overview.  Ecology  
74:1638-1645. 
Smith, S.M.  1995.  Distribution-free and robust statistical methods: Viable alternatives to 
parametric statistics?  Ecology  76:1997-1998. 
Snedecor, G.W., and W.G. Cochran.  1989.  Statistical Methods, 8
th
ed.  Iowa State University 
Press, Ames, IA.  503pp.  
Sokal, R.R, and F.J. Rohlf.  1995.  Biometry, 3
rd
ed.  W.H. Freeman, New York, NY.  887pp. 
SPSSa.  1999.  SPSS analysis software package.  Version 9.0.1  SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL. 
SPSSb.  1999.  SPSS User’s Guide, Version 9.0.  SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL.  740pp.     
Stewart-Oaten, A.  1995.  Rules and judgments in statistics: Three examples.  Ecology  76:2001-
2009.     
Underwood, A.J.  1997.  Experiments in Ecology.  Cambridge University Press, New York, NY.  
504pp. 
Zar, J.H.  1999.  Biostatistical Analysis, 4
th
ed.  Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.  663pp. 
Zolman, J.F.  1993.  Biostatistics: Experimental Design and Statistical Inference.  Oxford 
University Press, New York, NY.  343pp. 
Statistical Analysis of BLM Desert Tortoise Surveys 
In Support of the West Mojave Management Plan 
Report III: 
Desert Tortoises at DWMAs and 
Association of Tortoise Encounters 
and Sign Counts On Transects 
5 September 2002 
by 
Anthony J. Krzysik, Ph.D. 
11 Highland Terrace 
Prescott, AZ  86305
2
Introduction 
This report compares four Desert Wildlife Management Areas (DWMAs) with respect to tortoise 
survey transects, and also provides detailed statistical analyses and graphical presentations for 
exploring and assessing the association of live tortoise encounters with tortoise sign counts on 
surveyed 1.5 mile triangular transects.  Three different databases were used in the analyses: 1370 
(13 had missing data cells) transects surveyed in 1999 and 2001 at the four DWMAs, 624 
transects surveyed in 1998, 1999, and 2001 at 7 “Calibration Plots”, and 876 transects surveyed 
in 1998 at localities undisclosed in the database.  Statistical procedures used in the analyses 
were: Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Parametric and Nonparametric Bivariate Correlation 
Analyses, and Graphical Associations of Transect Means for the Association Analysis. 
These data and analysis results support the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land 
Management, West Mojave Management Plan.  Ed LaRue of BLM is the primary monitor of this 
analysis effort and the Principal Investigator for the incorporation of desert tortoise conservation 
and management in the development of this plan.  Kathy Buescher, Senior Wildlife Biologist at 
Chambers Group, Inc., is the subcontract manager. 
The databases used for these specific analyses were developed and sent to me by Emily Cohen, 
Ric Williams, and Hubert Switalski.  I edited and modified the databases for statistical analysis 
procedures.   
Methods 
Data analyses were conducted with the SPSS statistical package (SPSS 1999a).  Four tortoise 
sign counts were used in the analysis: burrows, scats, TCS, and carcasses.  The variable burrow 
is the actual observed tortoise burrow count on individual surveyed transects and was available 
from the data matrix.  The variable scat is the corrected tortoise scat count on individual 
surveyed transects, and was calculated from the data matrix as (TCS – burrow).  Raw scat counts 
require to be “corrected” because some scats are found in clumps, which are treated as a “single 
count”.  The variable TCS (Total Corrected Sign) is the total burrow + corrected scat count on 
individual surveyed transects and was available from the data matrix.  The variable carcass is the 
observation of tortoise shells (carapace/plastron) or skeletal remains on the transect.  Survey 
transects were further classified into three different subclasses based on their TCS and burrow 
counts (Table 1). 
Subclass 
TCS 
Subclass 
TCS 
Subclass 
Burrows
Low 
0-6 
0-1 
2-3 
High 
>6 
4-6 
7-9 
>9 
>3 
Table 1.
Classification of tortoise survey transects based on TCS and burrow counts. 
3
Tortoise sign require square root data transformation, because the data represent counts with 
many data cells being “0”.  Counts, particularly of rare events, follow a Poisson distribution 
where the mean equals the variance, and therefore the mean and variance cannot be independent, 
but vary identically.  All the sign data was transformed as x = (x+0.5)
1/2
, where x represents a 
tortoise sign variable (Sokal and Rohlf 1995). 
Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to statistically assess differences among DWMAs with 
respect to burrows, scats, TCS, live tortoises, and carcasses.  Years (1999, 2001) were analyzed 
separately, and also combined to increase sample size for analyses.  TCS classes Low and High 
(Table 2) were analyzed separately and also combined for analyses. 
Year 
1999 
2001 
TCS 
Class 
Low TCS 
(0-6) 
High TCS 
(>6) 
Low TCS
(0-6) 
High TCS 
(>6) 
Total 
DWMA 
Superior - 
Cronese 
526 
71 
145 
31 
773 
Fremont - 
Cramer 
193 
27 
179 
13 
412 
Ord - 
Rodman 
97 
11 
20 
129 
Pinto 
Mtn 
43 
43 
Total 
859 
109 
344 
45 
1357 
Table 2.  
Sample sizes at the four DWMAs in 1999 and 2001 for Low TCS and High TCS 
classes.
The 5 percent significance level (P<0.05) was used based on experience and general acceptance 
in ecological research and field biology.  Burrows, scats, TCS, tortoises, and carcasses were each 
used in separate analyses as dependent variables with DWMAs as “the factor”, the independent 
variable.  ANOVAs used Type III calculation of Sums of Squares, because this algorithm is 
generally recommended, it is invariant with respect to cell frequencies, and when there are no 
missing cells it is equivalent to Yates’ weighted-squares-of-means method (Milliken and 
Johnson 1984, Shaw and Mitchell-Olds 1993). 
Levene’s Test for equality of error variances was used for all analyses, and does not depend on 
the assumption of normality (Levene 1960).  Bartlett’s test is often used to assess homogeneity, 
but its practical value has been questioned (Harris 1975), and this test is not very efficient and 
strongly affected by non-normality (Zar 1999).  Levene’s Test uses the average of absolute 
deviations instead of the mean square of deviations, making it less sensitive to skewed 
distributions (Snedecor and Cochran 1989).  Levene’s Test checks to see if error variances are 
4
homogeneous among the factors being compared in an ANOVA.  Homogeneous variances are a 
parametric assumption in ANOVA.  ANOVA is a parametric statistical procedure that 
technically requires parametric assumptions to be met: homogeneous error variances, normally 
distributed data, adequate sample sizes, and independence of sampling or experimental errors 
(random sampling, independence of observations).  Nevertheless and importantly, ANOVA is 
considered robust to departures from the first two of these assumptions, particularly when proper 
transformations are employed (Sokal and Rohlf 1995, Underwood 1997, Zar 1999).  
Additionally, SPSS algorithms are very robust to nonnormality (Morgan and Griego 1998).  
Many researchers believe that the routine use of nonparametric statistics avoids many issues of 
parametric assumptions, but these methods are equally affected by the last two critical 
assumptions – independence of sampling errors and the loss of statistical power with inadequate 
sample sizes (Krzysik 1998).  The routine use of nonparametric analysis in ecological research is 
not recommended (Johnson 1995, Smith 1995, Stewart-Oaton 1995), but see Potvin and Roff 
(1993).  Table 3 provides the results of Levene’s Test for the ANOVA analyses of DWMAs. 
Year  TCS 
Class 
Burrows  Scats  TCS  Tortoises Carcasses
1999 & 
2001 
All 
0.001 
<0.001 
0.001 
<0.001 
<0.001 
1357 
1999 
All 
NS 
(0.070) 
<0.001 
0.003 
0.001 
<0.001 
968 
2001 
All 
<0.001 
<0.001  <0.001 
<0.001 
<0.001 
389 
1999 & 
2001 
Low 
NS 
(0.23) 
<0.001 
0.041 
<0.001 
<0.001 
1203 
1999 & 
2001 
High 
NS 
(0.61) 
NS 
(0.23) 
NS 
(0.12) 
NS 
(0.14) 
NS 
(0.36) 
154 
1999 
Low 
NS 
(0.61) 
0.001 
NS 
(0.072) 
<0.001 
<0.001 
859 
1999 
High 
NS 
(0.73) 
NS 
(0.47) 
NS 
(0.25) 
NS 
(0.14) 
NS 
(0.22) 
109 
Table 3.  
Statistical significance of Levene’s Test for homogeneity of variances for ANOVA of 
DWMAs in 1999 and 2001.  Analyses were not conducted on TCS classes for 2001 because of 
small sample size and the lack of surveys at Pinto Mountain.  Note the high degree of 
heterogeneity in the DWMA data set.  Values of P <0.001 are highly significant. 
ANOVA designs require the use of Post Hoc Multiple Comparison Tests to assess statistical 
significance when there are more than two levels for any factor.  Five Post Hoc multiple 
comparison tests were used in the ANOVA analyses.  The Bonferroni test, based on the 
Student’s t statistic, adjusts the significance level for multiple comparisons.  This test has the 
widest range of applications, is conservative, and when there are few comparisons has high 
power (Zolman 1993, SPSS 1999b).  Conservative tests were desirable in these analyses, because 
they minimize Type I error, the probability of rejecting a true null hypothesis (null hypothesis = 
no significance difference) (Krzysik 1998).  In other words, erroneously reporting significance 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested