5
when the comparison was not statistically significant.  Importantly, when factor variances are 
heterogeneous (i.e., Levene’s Test is significant), pooled estimates of variance cannot be used to 
calculate the standard error of the comparison (Day and Quinn 1989).  The use of Post Hoc tests 
that specifically address variance heterogeneity are recommended (Day and Quinn 1989, SPSS 
1999b).  Therefore, the high degree of data heterogeneity (Table 3), motivated the use of four 
additional Post Hoc tests that fit this criteria.   
Tamhane’s T2 – conservative pairwise comparison test based on a t test 
Dunnett’s T3 – pairwise comparison test based on the Studentized maximum modulus, 
highly recommended (Fry 1993) 
Games-Howell – liberal pairwise comparisons test, highly recommended (Fry 1993) 
Dunnett’s C – pairwise comparisons test based on the Studentized range 
Although all five tests were examined for significance at the 0.05 level, only the results of the 
conservative Tamhane’s T2 test were reported.  The results of all five Post Hoc tests were 
usually similar for all the factorial ANOVA analyses conducted in this study.  This indicates that 
the data were reasonably behaved.  As expected, the Games-Howell test was more liberal, while 
the Bonferroni test was frequently very liberal in contrast to the other four tests, particularly 
when Levene’s Test showed significant departure from homogeneous residuals.  
Bivariate parametric and nonparametric correlation analyses were performed on the three data 
sets (DWMAs, Calibration Plots, 1998 Data) to assess the association of live tortoises with: 
burrows, scats, TCS, and carcasses on survey transects.  The parametric test was the Pearson 
Product Moment Correlation Coefficient.  Two nonparametric rank correlations were used: 
Spearman’s rho and Kendall’s tau, and these gave results similar to the parametric test.  The 
values reported in Tables 5, 6, 7, and 8 are Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient with the two-tailed 
analysis.  The two-tailed analysis is more conservative than the one-tailed, and therefore, 
minimizes Type I error. 
Graphical presentations are provided to visually assess the association of live tortoise encounters 
with tortoise sign on survey transects.  The data used was based on transect means of tortoises, 
burrows, and scats assessed at the three subclasses shown in Table 1.  Burrow and scat transect 
means were multiplied by “10” and tortoise means by “100” for the purpose of convenient 
scaling of the graphics.  Association of metrics through graphical visualizations represents an   
important tool for conveying information to the reader that may be difficult to track statistically 
(Tufte 1983, Harris 1999).  
Results 
Statistical Comparison of Desert Wildlife Management Areas (DWMAs) 
Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) of transformed data was used to compare four DWMAs 
(Superior – Cronese, Fremont – Kramer, Ord – Rodman, and Pinto Mountain).  Data were 
collected in 1999 and 2001 on standardized 1.5 mile triangular transects.  The Pinto Mountain 
Pdf searchable text converter - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert pdf to searchable text online; pdf text search
Pdf searchable text converter - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
can't select text in pdf file; search text in pdf using java
6
DWMA was not surveyed in 2001.  Sample sizes for the analyses are provided in Table 2.  Note 
that the data were subdivided into LOW (0-6) and HIGH (>6) Total Corrected Sign (TCS) 
classes.  Table 3 provides the statistical significance of Levene’s Test for homogeneity of 
variances for all of the ANOVA contrasts in the DWMA comparisons.  Note that in most of the 
sign comparisons the data were highly variable – Levene’s Test was highly significant.  Data 
heterogeneity only stabilized when sign counts increased on the survey transects (i.e., TCS >6).  
Importantly, also note that burrow counts were more homogeneous than any other transect 
counts. 
Table 4 provides a summary of the ANOVA comparisons at all four DWMAs.  Analyses were 
not conducted separately for 2001 TCS classes because of small sample size and the lack of data 
for Pinto Mountain.  Note that there was no significant difference among the DWMAs in the 
number of live tortoise encountered on transects.  The analysis of transects with High TCS 
counts not only had a small sample size, but also innately selected transects with high scat 
counts.  Therefore, it was not surprising that there were no significant differences among the 
DWMAs in scat and TCS counts.  However, burrow counts were significantly different.  I 
attribute this significance of burrow counts to the relatively small sample sizes, and the reality of 
high scat counts relative to burrow counts inflating some of the TCS values.  Importantly, if the 
two data sets for “High TCS counts” are not included; note that scat, TCS, and carcass counts are 
highly significantly different among the DWMAs in all comparisons, while burrow counts are 
statistically similar at all DWMAs and parallel the results derived for live tortoises. 
Year 
TCS 
Class 
Burrows  Scats 
TCS  Tortoises Carcasses 
1999 
and 
2001 
All 
NS 
(0.13) 
** 
(0.002) 
*** 
(<0.001) 
NS 
(>0.41) 
*** 
(<0.001) 
1357 
1999 
All 
NS 
(0.53) 
** 
(0.003) 
** 
(0.001) 
NS 
(0.20) 
** 
(0.001) 
968 
2001 
All 
NS 
(0.078) 
** 
(0.002) 
** 
(0.003) 
NS 
(>0.05) 
** 
(0.001) 
389 
1999 
and 
2001 
Low 
NS 
(0.91) 
*** 
(<0.001) 
** 
(0.005) 
NS 
(>0.27) 
*** 
(<0.001) 
1203 
1999 
and 
2001 
High 
(0.018) 
NS 
(0.55) 
NS 
(0.64) 
NS 
(0.63) 
NS 
(0.94) 
154 
1999 
Low 
NS 
(0.97) 
** 
(0.002) 
(0.010) 
NS 
(>0.36) 
** 
(0.001) 
859 
1999 
High 
** 
(0.008) 
NS 
(0.41) 
NS 
(0.73) 
NS 
(0.60) 
NS 
(0.89) 
109 
Table 4.
ANOVA results of the comparison of the four DWMAs with data collected in 1999 
and 2001.  See Table 2 for DWMA identification and specific sample sizes, and Table 1 for TCS 
class definition.  NS = Not Significant (P>0.05). 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
document to editable & searchable text file. Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit
how to select text in pdf; searching pdf files for text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
document to editable & searchable text file. Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit
text searchable pdf; how to select text in pdf reader
7
The Appendix provides the results of the detailed Post-Hoc Multiple Comparison of all ANOVA 
results using Tamhane’s T2 procedure (see Methods).  These data along with Table 4 
summarizes the results presented and discussed in Report II (Krzysik 2002b).  These results 
suggest that in 1999 Pinto Mountain had less scat counts, and subsequently lower TCS counts 
than the other three DWMAs.  In 2001, when Pinto Mountain was not surveyed, Fremont – 
Kramer had lower scat and TCS than Superior – Cronese when all TCS classes were considered, 
but only had lower scat than Ord – Rodman when Low TCS data were used. 
Carcass counts were significantly different among the four DWMAs.  On the basis of the data 
summarized in the Appendix, the following ranking of carcass counts was established. 
Fremont – Kramer  
>
Superior – Cronese  
>
(Ord – Rodman  
=
Pinto Mountain)                        
Ed LaRue provided me with Desert Tortoise estimated densities for the four DWMAs, where the 
Distance Sampling method was used for density estimation.  Figure 1 provides these tortoise 
density estimates along with the standard error and the tortoise encounter rate for 100 km of 
transect. 
Figure 1.
Estimated desert tortoise densities at the four DWMAs based on the Distance 
Sampling method.  Data values are the mean with standard error.     
Figure 2 provides the tortoise density estimates along with the 95% confidence interval of the 
estimates.  Pinto Mountain has the largest “error bar” around the mean because of its smaller 
sample size.  On the basis of the Distance Sampling estimated means and their error terms at all 
four DWMAs appear to possess similar tortoise densities, with the possibility that Superior-
Estimated Desert Tortoise Densities at Four DWMAs 
(2001 Distance Sampling Estimates)
Ord-Rodman
Pinto Mtn
Fremont-Kramer Superior-Cronese
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
X
X
X
X
X = Tortoise encounter rate per 100 km
Tortoises/km
2
(mean with standard error)
Data from: Ed LaRue
31 August 2002
L=317
L=128
L=339
L=323
L = Total Survey Transect Length (km)
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats.
converting pdf to searchable text format; search a pdf file for text
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
for VB.NET provides users fast and accurate image recognition function, which converts scanned images into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD
search text in multiple pdf; how to select text in pdf and copy
8
Cronese has a slightly lower density.  On the basis of the estimated mean tortoise density, 
Superior – Cronese had a 21% lower density than Fremont – Kramer, and 35% less than Ord – 
Rodman.  Nevertheless, there was a great deal of overlap evident in the standard errors and 95% 
confidence intervals. 
Figure 2.
Estimated desert tortoise densities at the four DWMAs based on the Distance 
Sampling method.  Data values are the mean with 95% confidence interval.      
Bivariate Correlation Analyses 
Extensive bivariate correlation analyses were performed to explore the association of live 
tortoise encounters on the 1.5 mile triangular survey transects with four other transect signs: 
burrows, scats, TCS (burrows + scats), and carcasses.  In all analyses, similar results were 
obtained with Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient (Parametric) and the two 
Nonparametric rank correlations, Spearman’s rho and Kendall’s tau.  The reality of extremely 
low tortoise encounter rates on survey transects (usually 0), makes for small correlation 
coefficients.  Nevertheless, sample sizes are large enough to provide statistically significant 
correlations and explore potential relationships.  This is discussed in greater detail in the next 
section. 
Estimated Desert Tortoise Densities at Four DWMAs 
(2001 Distance Sampling Estimates)
Ord-Rodman
Pinto Mtn
Fremont-Kramer Superior-Cronese
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
Tortoises/km
2
(mean with 95% confidence interval)
Data from: Ed LaRue
31 August 2002
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
search pdf files for text; select text in pdf reader
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications. C#.NET PDF Document Drawing Application.
pdf text select tool; text searchable pdf file
9
Table 5 provides the bivariate correlations of live tortoise encounters with burrow, scat, TCS, 
and carcass counts on individual transects at the four DWMAs.  This table was also provided in 
Report II (Krzysik 2002b, Table 3). 
Sites: DWMAs  
Year:  1999 and 2001 
Tortoise vs 
Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
Carcasses  N 
All 
0.37** 
0.20** 
0.29** 
0.045 
1351 
1999 
0.35** 
0.16** 
0.26** 
0.030 
962 
2001 
0.44** 
0.29** 
0.38** 
0.088 
389 
Low TCS 
0.27** 
0.95** 
0.22** 
0.024 
1197 
High TCS 
0.38** 
-0.11 
0.062 
0.058 
154 
0-1 TCS 
0.13** 
0.020 
0.12** 
-0.029 
750 
2-3 TCS 
0.24** 
-0.20** 
0.12* 
-0.036 
277 
4-6 TCS 
0.16* 
-0.11 
0.020 
0.076 
170 
7-9 TCS 
0.34** 
-0.31** 
-0.14 
0.16 
88 
>9 TCS 
0.45** 
-0.063 
0.16 
-0.085 
66 
Table 5.  
Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient of LIVE TORTOISES with four 
tortoise sign parameters: burrows, scats, TCS, and carcasses.  N is the sample size. 
* indicates statistical significance (P<0.05) 
** indicates high statistical significance (P<0.01) 
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
find and replace text in pdf; how to select text in pdf image
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
PDF converter SDK for converting adobe PDF from TXT in Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF
search text in pdf using java; convert pdf to searchable text online
10
Table 6 provides the bivariate correlations of live tortoise encounters with burrow, scat, TCS, 
and carcass counts on individual transects at the Calibration Plots. 
Sites:  Calibration Plots   
Year:  1998, 1999, 2001 
Tortoise vs 
Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
Carcasses  N 
All 
0.39** 
0.17** 
0.26** 
-0.004 
624 
1998 
0.26** 
0.020 
0.099 
0.11 
180 
1999 
0.45** 
0.22** 
0.33** 
-0.043 
282 
2001 
0.43** 
0.25** 
0.33** 
-0.074 
162 
Low TCS 
0.24** 
0.024 
0.14** 
-0.057 
388 
High TCS 
0.40** 
-0.005 
0.18** 
0.018 
236 
0-1 TCS 
0.076 
-0.071 
0.001 
-0.022 
149 
2-3 TCS 
0.16 
-0.21* 
-0.084 
-0.079 
108 
4-6 TCS 
0.22* 
-0.24** 
-0.070 
-0.075 
131 
7-9 TCS 
0.40** 
-0.41** 
0.022 
0.18 
93 
>9 TCS 
0.39** 
-0.004 
0.19* 
-0.11 
143 
Table 6.  
Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient of LIVE TORTOISES with four 
tortoise sign parameters: burrows, scats, TCS, and carcasses.  N is the sample size. 
* indicates statistical significance (P<0.05) 
** indicates high statistical significance (P<0.01) 
Sample sizes at Calibration Plots are as follows: 
Plot
Number of Transects
Lucerne   
186 
Kramer 
180 
Fremont 
156 
Alvord  
42 
Liz   
42 
DTNA  
12 
Johnson 
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
less searchable for search engines. The other is the crashing problem when user is visiting the PDF file using web browser. Our PDF to HTML converter library
how to select all text in pdf file; select text in pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
search pdf documents for text; make pdf text searchable
11
Table 7 provides the bivariate correlations of live tortoise encounters with burrow, scat, TCS, 
and carcass counts on individual transects for surveys conducted in 1998. 
Sites:  Unknown 
Year:  1998 
Tortoise vs 
Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
Carcasses  N 
All 
0.29** 
0.14** 
0.23** 
-0.004 
876 
Low TCS 
0.28** 
0.089* 
0.22** 
0.029 
662 
High TCS 
0.21** 
-0.007 
0.12 
-0.084 
214 
0-1 TCS 
0.13* 
-0.052 
0.055 
-0.038 
308 
2-3 TCS 
0.15* 
-0.081 
0.11 
0.013 
192 
4-6 TCS 
0.22** 
-0.27** 
-0.13 
-0.014 
162 
7-9 TCS 
0.11 
-0.058 
0.11 
-0.17 
93 
>9 TCS 
0.27** 
-0.032 
0.14 
-0.020 
121 
Table 7.  
Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient of LIVE TORTOISES with four 
tortoise sign parameters: burrows, scats, TCS, and carcasses.  N is the sample size. 
* indicates statistical significance (P<0.05) 
** indicates high statistical significance (P<0.01) 
12
Table 8 represents randomly selected subsets of transect data from the DWMA database.  Ten 
bivariate correlation analyses were performed for each of six subsets of data from the original 
data.  The data subsets represented approximately 2%, 3%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 50% of the 
original data. 
Tortoise vs  Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
0.48** 
0.43** 
0.48** 
31 
0.086 
-0.11 
-0.045 
28 
0.60** 
0.43** 
0.54** 
30 
2% 
0.54** 
0.43** 
0.50** 
33 
of Data 
0.45** 
0.45** 
0.49** 
28 
0.37 
0.12 
0.32 
27 
0.094 
0.060 
0.072 
34 
0.57** 
0.41** 
0.53** 
25 
0.074 
0.20 
0.16 
24 
0.38 
-0.16 
0.049 
22 
Tortoise vs  Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
0.26 
0.088 
0.16 
35 
0.57** 
0.26 
0.43** 
35 
0.60** 
0.20 
0.41** 
43 
3% 
0.33* 
0.15 
0.24 
42 
of Data 
0.39* 
0.25 
0.38* 
37 
0.21 
0.17 
0.20 
53 
0.097 
0.51 
0.23 
42 
0.26 
0.28 
0.29 
42 
0.39* 
0.40** 
0.44** 
42 
0.25 
0.28 
0.29 
33 
Table 8.  
Randomly generated subsets of the DWMA database.  Ten bivariate correlation 
analyses were performed for each of six subsets of data.  The data subsets represent 2%, 3%, 
5%, 10%, 20%, and 50% of the original sample transects.  Statistical significance as in Table 7.  
13
Tortoise vs  Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
0.42** 
0.32** 
0.42** 
83 
0.47** 
0.32** 
0.39** 
65 
0.43** 
0.037 
0.23 
52 
5% 
0.35** 
0.40** 
0.42** 
59 
of Data 
0.46** 
0.14 
0.27* 
73 
0.21 
0.16 
0.20 
57 
0.34** 
0.44** 
0.47** 
68 
0.33* 
0.13 
0.21 
59 
0.16 
0.42** 
0.42** 
72 
0.26* 
0.18 
0.24 
67 
Tortoise vs  Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
0.31** 
0.21* 
0.28** 
122 
0.35** 
0.18* 
0.28** 
155 
0.37** 
0.24** 
0.32** 
147 
10% 
0.35** 
0.20* 
0.27** 
138 
of Data 
0.47** 
0.13 
0.30** 
132 
0.39** 
0.30** 
0.37** 
140 
0.35** 
0.039 
0.17 
133 
0.23** 
0.17 
0.22* 
130 
0.39** 
0.36** 
0.40** 
136 
0.31** 
0.16 
0.25** 
121 
Table 8.  
(continued) 
14
Tortoise vs  Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
0.39** 
0.27** 
0.35** 
266 
0.21** 
0.15* 
0.21** 
285 
0.44** 
0.19** 
0.32** 
252 
20% 
0.30** 
0.13* 
0.22** 
283 
of Data 
0.32** 
0.083 
0.20** 
270 
0.34** 
0.25** 
0.33** 
256 
0.33** 
0.25** 
0.33** 
263 
0.38** 
0.26** 
0.35** 
275 
0.35** 
0.21** 
0.29** 
272 
0.33** 
0.19** 
0.27** 
263 
Tortoise vs  Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
0.34** 
0.17** 
0.26** 
678 
0.36** 
0.22** 
0.30** 
671 
0.37** 
0.20** 
0.30** 
645 
50% 
0.35** 
0.16** 
0.25** 
685 
of Data 
0.41** 
0.24** 
0.33** 
655 
0.45** 
0.25** 
0.36** 
660 
0.36** 
0.20** 
0.28** 
641 
0.30** 
0.19** 
0.26** 
701 
0.36** 
0.16** 
0.26** 
667 
0.33** 
0.17** 
0.25** 
672 
Tortoise vs  Burrows 
Scats 
TCS 
100% 
of Data 
0.37** 
0.20** 
0.29** 
1352 
Table 8.  
(continued) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested