how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : How to select text in pdf application software tool html winforms asp.net online Vol-2-Complete-Bookmarks27-part2012

35
1999 
All TCS Classes 
NS   
0.20 
TCS LOW (0-6) 
NS   
>0.36 
TCS HIGH (>6) 
NS   
0.60 
2001 
All TCS Classes 
NS   
>0.05 
Carcasses 
1999 and 2001 
All TCS Classes 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Ord – Rodman  
<0.001 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Pinto Mtn 
<0.001 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Superior – Cronese  0.005 
Superior – Cronese  >  Ord – Rodman 
0.001 
Superior – Cronese  >  Pinto Mtn   
0.046 
How to select text in pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf for text; cannot select text in pdf file
How to select text in pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to search text in pdf document; find text in pdf files
36
TCS LOW (0-6) 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Ord – Rodman  
<0.001 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Pinto Mtn 
<0.001 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Superior – Cronese  0.002 
Superior – Cronese  >  Ord – Rodman 
0.001 
TCS HIGH (>6) 
NS   
0.94 
1999 
All TCS Classes 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Ord – Rodman  
0.001 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Pinto Mtn 
0.002 
Superior – Cronese  >  Ord – Rodman 
0.021 
Superior – Cronese  >  Pinto Mtn   
0.043 
TCS LOW (0-6) 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Ord – Rodman  
<0.001 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Pinto Mtn 
0.002 
Superior – Cronese  >  Ord – Rodman 
0.012 
TCS HIGH (>6) 
NS   
0.89 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
text searchable pdf file; can't select text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
pdf make text searchable; pdf text search tool
37
2001 
All TCS Classes 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Ord – Rodman  
<0.001 
Fremont – Kramer  >  Superior - Cronese  0.021 
Superior – Cronese  >  Ord – Rodman 
<0.001 
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. VB.NET PDF - Redact PDF Text. Help
select text in pdf file; how to make a pdf file text searchable
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Redact PDF Text in C#.NET.
find and replace text in pdf; pdf find and replace text
Appendices 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
search a pdf file for text; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
pdf search and replace text; how to make pdf text searchable
Appendices 
APPENDIX L 
MISCELLANEOUS  
TORTOISE 
BACKGROUND DATA
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
make pdf text searchable; search pdf files for text programmatically
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
pdf editor with search and replace text; text searchable pdf
Appendices 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
pdf text select tool; text select tool pdf
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
how to make a pdf document text searchable; how to select text in pdf reader
Appendices 
MISCELLANEOUS TORTOISE BACKGROUND DATA 
Appendix L presents a discussion of additional background material concerning the 
desert tortoise, field surveys, observations made during those surveys and other data that 
supports Chapter 3’s treatment of the tortoise.  The appendix addresses the following topics: 
•  Federal Lead Agencies and Tortoises Handled and Accidentally Killed 
•  Tortoise Sign Counts 
•  Revised Desert Tortoise Range Map (2002) 
•  Symptoms of URTD and Shell Disease Observed During Sign Count Surveys 
•  Carcass Observation Analysis 
•  Relative tortoise Occurrence in Open Areas 
L.1  FEDERAL LEAD AGENCIES AND TORTOISES HANDLED AND 
ACCIDENTALLY KILLED 
Of the 133 biological opinions issued in California, 101 led to ground disturbance when 
projects were developed, resulting in the loss of 53 tortoises (LaRue and Dougherty 1998).   
Table L-1 summarizes the federal lead agencies associated with these 101 projects. 
Table L-1 
Federal Lead Agencies And Tortoises Handled And Accidentally Killed During 
Construction Of 101 Projects In California Between 1990 And 1995 
FEDERAL LEAD 
AGENCY 
PROJECTS 
TORTOISES 
HANDLED 
DEAD TORTOISES
Federal Energy Reg. Comm. 
559 
38 
BLM 
50 
317 
Fort Irwin  
12 
Fed. Highway Admin. 
China Lake NAWS 
Farmer’s Home Administration 
Army Corps of Engineers 
Dept. of Education 
Dept. of Veterans Affairs 
Edwards Air Force Base 
27 
10 
NASA 
National Park Service 
29 Palms Marine Corps Base 
Total 
101 
922 
54 
There were at least 13 federal lead agencies funding, authorizing, or carrying out projects 
in tortoise habitat between 1990 and 1995 in California.  One biological opinion was issued to 
the Farmer’s Home Administration, but that project had not been implemented as of the date of 
preparation of the 1995 report.  The project, a 52-mile long water pipeline in the Copper 
Mountain Mesa area of San Bernardino County, was constructed late in 1995.  One death was 
associated with construction and three tortoises were moved out of harm’s way (Circle Mountain 
Appendices 
Biological Consultants 1995).  Although the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission was 
responsible for only one project (the Mojave-Kern River Pipeline), that one project was 
responsible for 72% (38 of 53 tortoises) of the documented tortoise mortality. 
L.2  TORTOISE SIGN COUNTS 
L.2.1  Sign Count Surveys Since 1988 
Sign count surveys conducted since 1988 (see Map 3-6) provide the most recent, 
available data on the distribution of tortoise sign, which Dr. Anthony Krzysik (2002a, b, c; see 
Appendix K) has show to be positively correlated to incidence of tortoises.  Over 8,100 transects 
have been surveyed on more that 6,300 square miles within the West Mojave planning area.  
These survey efforts are summarized in Table L-2. 
Table L-2 
Regional Tortoise Surveys Completed Since 1988 
GEOGRAPHIC 
AREA 
DATE  TRANSECTS SQUARE 
MILES 
LITERATURE 
CITATION 
Outside Fort Irwin 
(west, east, and south) 
1988 
90 
90 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1988 
Fort Irwin and 
Goldstone 
1989 
406 
406 
Woodman & Goodlett 1990, Krzysik 
1994 
California City, Rand 
Mountains, Fremont 
Valley, Spangler Hills 
1990 
450 
150 
Berry et al. 1994 
China Lake Naval Air 
Weapons Station 
1990 
270 
270 
Kiva Biological Consulting and 
McClenahan & Hopkins Associates, 
Inc. 1990 
Fort Irwin (including 
expansion areas) 
1990 
468 
468 
Chambers Group, Inc. 1990 
Fort Irwin (including the 
North Alvord Slope 
proposed expansion 
area) 
1992 
134 
134 
Chambers Group, Inc. 1994 
Edwards Air Force Base 
1992 
672 
224 
Mitchell et al. 1993 
Edwards Air Force Base  
1994 
315 
105 
Laabs et al. 1996 
Twentynine Palms 
Marine Corps Base 
1997 
850 
850 
GIS database provided by Marine 
Corps, with no associated document 
West Mojave Survey 
1998 
875 
856 
Reported herein 
West Mojave - Fort 
Irwin Survey 
1999 
1,553 
1,291 
Reported herein 
Remaining West Mojave 
2001 – 
2002 
1,453 
1,329 
Reported herein 
Fort Irwin 2000 
Expansion Area 
2001 
568 
568 
Karl 2002 
Totals   
8,104 
6,741 
Appendices 
L.2.2 Methodology 
Tortoise sign count data have historically been used to determine relative tortoise 
densities (Berry and Nicholson 1984; Chambers Group, Inc. 1990, 1994; Doak et al. 1994;  
Krzysik 1994; USFWS 1991b).  For example, Berry and Nicholson (1984), using sign count data 
and other information, concluded that there were “...approximately 229,666 to more than 
426,361 tortoises...present in the Western Mojave Region” as of that date.  It has been very 
common in the literature for tortoise densities to be categorized as follows: 0-20, 20-50, 50-100, 
100-250, and >250 tortoises/square mile. Berry’s 1984 tortoise range map (Berry and Nicholson 
1984) shows polygons of tortoise densities corresponding to the five categories.  Results of sign 
count surveys have often been reported in terms of these density categories, for example 
(Chambers Group, Inc. 1990), “... the proposed [Fort Irwin] acquisition lands contained in this 
study comprise approximately 7.3 percent of all lands in the western Mojave with 21 to 50 
tortoises per square mile, 14.5 percent of all lands in the western Mojave with 51 to 100 tortoises 
per square mile, and 4.9 percent of all lands in the western Mojave with 101 to 250 tortoises per 
square mile.” 
The method developed (reported in Berry and Nicholson 1984) required the use of 
tortoise density estimates that were previously determined during 60-day surveys on BLM 
permanent study plots.  The BLM employed experienced tortoise biologists to mark all tortoises 
encountered during the first 30-day survey period covering the entire square mile, then had them 
resurvey the same plot during a second 30-day period to recapture previously-marked animals.  
The Lincoln-Peterson Index was then used to determine the density of tortoises occurring on that 
square mile. 
As reported elsewhere, sign count surveys have been the primary means of assessing 
tortoise distribution and densities on regional scales since the mid-1970's.  In each case, the 
tortoise biologists would survey a set of six 1.5-mile, equilateral transects on at least three of the 
permanent study plots, which until the early 1990's were surveyed (during the 60-day period) at 
about four-year intervals.  Regression statistics applied to the resulting data required that the 
three plots include relatively low, medium, and high Total Corrected Sign (TCS) counts.  In the 
planning area, these plots have traditionally included Fremont Peak (low), Kramer Hills 
(intermediate), and Lucerne Valley (high) plots.   
Table L-3 shows the data that were collected at these three study plots by three different 
surveyors (1
st
column) in support of the 2001-2002 surveys completed for the West Mojave Plan. 
Each of the surveyors walked six 1.5-mile transects, along same compass bearings, and recorded 
Total Sign (outside the parenthesis in the following table) and Total Corrected Sign (inside the 
parenthesis).  In this way, there can be direct comparisons among the surveyors to determine the 
relative abundance of tortoise sign (only scat and burrows are factored into TCS, although data 
on live animals and carcasses are recorded) on each of the plots. 
Appendices 
Table L-3 
Total Sign and Total Corrected Sign of  
Tortoises Found on Three Permanent Study Plots in 2001-2002 in the WMPA 
2001 FREMONT 
Surveyor
North
Northwest
West
South
Southeast
East
Totals
Boland 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
2 (2) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
1 (1) 
3 (3) 
LaRue 
1 (1) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
1 (2) 
2 (3) 
Vaughn 
1 (1) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
0 (0) 
1 (1) 
2001 Kramer 
Surveyor
North
Northwest
West
South
Southeast
East
Totals
Boland 
6 (8) 
6 (6) 
4 (4) 
3 (3) 
9 (10) 
2 (2) 
30 (33) 
LaRue 
5 (6) 
6 (6) 
8 (11) 
6 (7) 
4 (10) 
10 (13) 
39 (53) 
Vaughn 
9 (10) 
5 (5) 
6 (7) 
5 (6) 
7 (7) 
6 (7) 
38 (42) 
2001 Lucerne 
Surveyor
North
Northwest
West
South
Southeast
East
Totals
Boland 
20 (36) 
3 (3) 
4 (5) 
14 (17) 
19 (28) 
15 (20) 
75 (109) 
LaRue 
22 (39) 
7 (10) 
12 (21) 
31 (43) 
25 (37) 
17 (23) 
114 (173) 
Vaughn 
26 (37) 
10 (14) 
9 (15) 
28 (31) 
10 (12) 
8 (13) 
91 (122) 
Although sign counts differed among surveyors, it should be apparent in the 8
th
column 
that there was relatively less sign on the Fremont plot (average of 2 TCS), an intermediate 
number on the Kramer plot (average of 36), and relatively more on the Lucerne plot (average of 
93).  Given the inherent differences among surveyor’s finding abilities, these data were used to 
calibrate the surveyor to known densities of tortoises occurring on low, medium, and high 
density study plot areas.  A resulting, unique calibration coefficient was assigned to each 
surveyor.  Later, when transects were surveyed throughout the region in areas of unknown 
tortoise densities, these coefficients were applied to each surveyor’s field data (i.e., TCS), and 
used to estimate tortoise densities in those areas. 
L.2.3 Determining Tortoise Densities from Sign Count Data 
L.2.3.1 Use of Sign Count Data for West Mojave Planning Purposes 
Sign count surveys are one means of sampling tortoises but are not a means of censussing 
tortoises, where determining absolute numbers is the goal.  Krzysik (1992) has concluded that 
the standard sign count transect effectively covers about 1.3% of a given square mile, and as 
given above, multiple transects (at least three) are needed on a given square mile before 
statistically meaningful density estimates can be determined.  Given budgetary restrictions and 
the underlying intent of determining patterns of occurrence, surveys performed in support of the 
planning process were necessarily restricted to either one transect per square mile (1998, non-
expansion areas in 1999, and 2001-2001) or two/ square mile (1999 throughout the Fort Irwin 
expansion area). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested