how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : Search pdf for text in multiple files software control dll winforms web page windows web forms Vol-2-Complete-Bookmarks28-part2013

Appendices 
The planning team decided, early on, to avoid using sign count data from these surveys to 
estimate tortoise densities.  Instead, the data have been used to depict relative “patterns of 
occurrence” for tortoises throughout the planning area (West Mojave Plan Team 1999).  
Similarly, above-average and below-average sign counts have been used as relative measures of 
tortoise occurrence when deciding where protective measures are most effectively applied.  Such 
an approach avoids valid criticisms associated with estimating tortoise densities, but does not 
provide a clear, understandable means of determining the relationship between higher versus 
lower sign counts and tortoise occurrence. 
There is support in the literature for using the approach adopted by the planning team: 
“data are more valuable for determining the geographic distribution of tortoises” (National 
Ecology Research Center 1990); and, “It is important to obtain many positive and negative 
locality records because they best describe a species’ patterns of occurrence or absence: areas 
with high frequency of records may indicate preferred habitats and corridors between 
populations, and areas with an absence of tortoises may be unsuitable habitat or barriers to gene 
flow...Although total sign on transects is used to estimate the density of tortoises..., we mostly 
used these data to document the presence or absence of tortoises” (Bury et al. 1994).  Finally, 
Krzysik (1996) wrote that although “...the use of surrogate measures to assess or monitor 
wildlife populations has universally been criticized on issues of relevancy, accuracy, or precision 
... statistical modeling revealed that both burrow and scat counts were strongly positively 
correlated with the occurrence of tortoises on survey transects.” 
L.2.3.2 2002 Analyses of 1998 Through 2002 Sign Count Data 
Dr. Anthony Krzysik is a statistician who has worked with tortoise sign count data since 
1983 (Woodman et al. 1984), and has recently performed comparative analyses among different 
tortoise survey techniques for the USFWS.  During 2002, he was contracted by the planning 
team to help analyze sign count data collected since 1998.  He has provided three summary 
reports outlining his preliminary findings.  In the second report, Krzysik’s emphasis (bold font) 
is maintained to show the points that he originally emphasized.  The major findings of these 
three reports are given below; the reports are reprinted in their entirety in Appendix K. 
Krzysik, A. J. 1 May 2002.  Statistical Analysis of BLM Desert Tortoise Surveys In Support of 
the West Mojave Management Plan: Report I: Exploratory and Initial Data Analysis (1998, 
1999, and 2001 Calibration Data). 
•  Despite the acknowledged difficulty of observing live desert tortoises on survey 
transects, and the very high variability of tortoise sign (burrows and scats) among 
transects, there was a highly significant correlation (P<0.01) of live tortoises with 
burrows, scats, and TCS.  Although in most cases the actual correlation coefficient does 
not appear to be particularly high, the large sample sizes involved make the relationship 
highly statistically significant.  These results can be interpreted in the following general 
ways:  (a)  Transects associated with live tortoises are typically also associated with 
appreciable sign counts; and (b) Live tortoises are found to a much smaller extent on 
transects possessing little or no tortoise sign. 
Search pdf for text in multiple files - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text on pdf; how to search pdf files for text
Search pdf for text in multiple files - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
find text in pdf image; how to select text in pdf
Appendices 
•  A number of important patterns were evident from the correlation analyses: (a) The 
correlation analysis results were similar for all three data sets that were examined (i.e., 
Calibration Areas, 1998+1999+2001, 1998 tortoise survey areas, and 1999 tortoise 
survey areas), again possibly attributable to the high sample sizes; (b) Burrows had the 
highest correlation with tortoises, while scats had the lowest correlation; (c) Tortoises 
were not correlated with carcasses;  (d) With a few exceptions, carcasses were not 
correlated with tortoise sign; and (e) As expected, TCS was strongly correlated with scat, 
because on a given transect, scat counts are usually much higher than burrow counts.  
•  The result of this analysis [Step-Wise Linear Regression Model] clearly demonstrated 
that burrow counts were the only predictor variable necessary to explain the variability of 
tortoises on transects.  Statistically, scats and TCS did not contribute significant 
information to the regression. 
•  Desert tortoises should be closely associated with their sign (i.e., burrows and scats).  
Based on their dedication to small home ranges, and because tortoises spend a major 
portion of their lives in burrows, particularly in drought years and bad weather (Duda and 
Krzysik 1998), it is intuitive that tortoise sign represents a surrogate for actual live 
tortoises. 
Krzysik, A. J.  19 June 2002.  Statistical Analysis of BLM Desert Tortoise Surveys In Support 
of the West Mojave Management Plan, Report II: Statistical Comparison of DWMAs (1999 & 
2001). 
•  Despite the acknowledged difficulty of observing live desert tortoises on survey 
transects, and the very high variability of tortoise sign (burrows and scats) among 
transects, there was a highly significant correlation (P<0.01) of live tortoises with 
burrows, scats, and TCS for the total DWMA data set and in each of the two years [1998 
and 1999]. 
•  However, when the data were classified by the abundance of TCS, the results of the 
correlation analysis became interesting.  On transects with high (>6) TCS, only burrows 
were significantly correlated with live tortoises.  When the TCS counts were further 
delineated into five classes, burrows consistently for all five classes were significantly 
correlated with tortoise counts, while scat counts and TCS were inconsistent and 
unreliable. 
•  Scat counts were very unreliable, and even demonstrated NEGATIVE significant 
correlations with tortoises with TCS classes of 2-3 and 7-9.  These results are very 
critical and interesting, because the majority of transects in any tortoise survey data set 
contain low sign counts, and high sample sizes may mask interesting details among 
gradients of sign densities. 
•  Carcass counts were not correlated with transect live tortoise counts.  A priori, everything 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files Demo Code in VB.NET. You
search pdf for text in multiple files; search pdf files for text
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
pages. Divide PDF file into multiple files by outputting PDF file size. Split outputFiles); Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#. You
convert pdf to word searchable text; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
Appendices 
else being equal, one would expect that DWMAs with higher tortoises densities would 
also possess higher carcass densities (a significant positive correlation), assuming 
mortality rates are similar.  DWMAs that suffered higher tortoise mortality should show a 
negative correlation between live tortoises and carcasses.  The carcass data suggest that 
BOTH tortoise densities and tortoise mortality rates are similar in the four DWMAs 
analyzed. 
•  The result of this analysis [Stepwise Linear Regression Model] clearly demonstrated that 
burrow counts were the only predictor variable necessary to explain the variability of 
tortoises on transects.  Statistically, scats and TCS did not contribute significant 
information to the regression.  As in the correlation analysis, Stepwise Linear Regression 
reinforces the validity in using burrow counts as a surrogate for tortoise counts. 
•  The data presented here and other evidence suggest that tortoise burrows appear to be a 
better surrogate for comparisons of tortoise distribution and relative abundance patterns 
than either scats or TCS.   
•  Burrow counts (densities) were similar in all DWMAs and for both 1999 and 2001.  
Interestingly, when only high (>6) TCS transects were analyzed, Superior - Cronese had 
higher burrow counts than Fremont - Kramer.  Pinto Mountain did not have any high 
TCS transects. 
•  Pinto Mountain had lower scat counts than the other DWMAs in 1999, and when 
considering only Low TCS transects.  Pinto Mountain was not represented in 2001 nor in 
high TCS transects.  In 2001, Superior - Cronese had higher scat counts than Fremont - 
Kramer.  However, when high TCS transects were analyzed, all DWMAs had similar scat 
counts. 
•  Live tortoise counts were similar at all DWMAs, for both 1999 and 2001, and for both 
low and high TCS transects.  However, statistical interpretation can be quite tenuous, 
because of the high variability and low sample sizes associated with finding tortoises on 
survey transects. 
•  Carcass counts were highest at Fremont - Kramer and Superior - Cronese.  Depending on 
the specific comparisons, these two DWMAs were either similar or the former had higher 
carcass counts than the latter.  Ord - Rodman and Pinto Mountain had lower carcass 
counts than the two above DWMAs, and they were similar to each other.  
•  Based on the available data and sample sizes, the four DWMAs appear to be similar to 
one another in their tortoise and sign counts, and therefore, of similar value as desert 
tortoise conservation areas.  Although there were some statistical differences with 
specific comparisons of scat and carcass counts, these parameters may not be important 
in elucidating actual tortoise densities. 
•  An interesting outcome of the ANOVA analyses was that burrow counts (i.e., densities) 
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Demo code to Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One. This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in VB.NET application.
search text in multiple pdf; convert pdf to searchable text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C# Turn multiple pages PDF into multiple jpg files
pdf searchable text converter; how to select all text in pdf
Appendices 
were higher at Superior - Cronese than at Fremont - Kramer for the high TCS transects.  
This suggests that either Superior - Cronese tortoises possess a higher burrow/tortoise 
ratio, or tortoises are more abundant at this DWMA. 
Of the many conclusions given above, for this discussion, Krzysik’s findings that tortoise 
sign counts are a relatively good estimator of tortoise abundance is considered sufficient 
evidence to (a) continue to use above-average sign counts as an indicator of relatively high 
tortoise abundance and (b) the data are useful in determining relative tortoise occurrence, even 
though they are not being used as a means to estimate tortoise densities. 
L.3  REVISED DESERT TORTOISE RANGE MAP 
Survey data were used to produce an updated range map of current tortoise distribution 
(See Map 3-9). The 1984 range map identified approximately 11,255 mi
2
(7,203,107 acres) of 
tortoise habitat, whereas 11,134 mi
(7,125,842 acres) are identified in the 2002 Tortoise Range 
Map, which represents a reduction of about 121 mi
2
.  Each of these figures over-estimates 
occupied tortoise habitat, as dry lake playas, elevations above about 4,500 feet, and other 
marginal or unsuitable habitats are included within both range lines.  They do not imply anything 
about the relative densities occurring in the older and more recent ranges.  Map 3-9 depicts three 
regions within the 2002 tortoise range: reduction areas, expansion areas, and areas requiring 
more surveys.   
Map 3-9 depicts three regions within the 2002 tortoise range: reduction areas, expansion 
areas, and areas requiring more surveys.  The range reduction areas occur to the south and 
southwest, where presence-absence data suggest tortoises have been extirpated from about 1,092 
mi
2
between Lucerne Valley and the Antelope Valley.  Not all extirpations are recent.  There are 
no available data to suggest that the southern and western portions of Antelope Valley supported 
tortoises when they were included in the 1984 range map.  However, 1995 aerial photography 
clearly shows that most of the area is active or fallow agriculture, and therefore not suitable 
habitat.  This does not represent a range reduction since 1984, but does provide a relatively 
accurate picture of historically occupied habitats that are no longer occupied.   
The range expansion area is primarily to the north on Fort Irwin, China Lake, and on 
BLM-managed lands to the west and northwest.  These are not new regions that have become 
occupied since 1984; they were likely occupied then as well.  Data collected in the 1970’s, 1988 
on China Lake, and in 1999 up to Rose Valley along Highway 395 clearly show that some 
evidence of tortoise has been found north of the 1984 range line.  In 2002, tortoise biologists 
(i.e., Peter Woodman, Dave Silverman, and Denise LaBerteaux) and land managers (i.e., Mickey 
Quillman of Fort Irwin, Tom Campbell of China Lake, and Bob Parker of Ridgecrest, BLM) 
were shown maps with available sign count data, 1984 range line, 20% slopes, and various other 
GIS coverages.  Each provided comments that helped LaRue refine the northern boundary. 
The areas needing more survey occur north of Rose Valley in Inyo County, north of 
Highway 138 in the Antelope Valley of Kern County, and in the vicinity of Pioneertown, north-
northwest of Yucca Valley in San Bernardino County.  As the name implies, there is some 
potential for tortoises to occur in these areas, but more focused surveys are needed before a 
relatively accurate range line can be delineated. 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction.
search multiple pdf files for text; search text in pdf using java
XDoc.Excel for .NET, Comprehensive .NET Excel Imaging Features
bookmarks, & thumbnail display; Integrated text search; Integrated annotation Convert Excel to PDF; Convert Excel to Combine and merge multiple Excel files; Append
pdf searchable text; select text in pdf
Appendices 
Alternative A’s No Survey Areas within the 2002 range line are recently or historically 
occupied areas that apparently no longer support tortoises, based on the best available data.  
Presence-absence survey data, digitized structures from 1995 aerials, and personal knowledge 
(LaRue, pers. comm.) were the primary sources of information used to delineate these areas, 
particularly to the south.  Agricultural fields were excluded, which affected substantial regions 
around Barstow, Hinkley, and the region bounded by Interstates 15 and 40, east to Troy Dry 
Lake.  Non-vegetated portions of playas, delineated from 1995 aerial photography, are included 
in this designation. 
Alternative A’s Survey Areas occur both inside and outside proposed DWMAs.  In most 
cases, sign count data were used inside DWMAs and other regions (i.e., BLM open areas, public 
lands in the ITA, etc.), and presence-absence data were used for urbanizing areas and less 
developed regions in all four counties. Areas needing more survey are included, but there is no 
evidence that tortoises occur.  Otherwise, there is an assumption that tortoises may be found 
throughout designated Survey Areas. 
L.4  SYMPTOMS OF URTD AND SHELL DISEASE OBSERVED DURING SIGN 
COUNT SURVEYS 
During sign count surveys in the fall and winter of 1998 through 2002, disease symptoms 
were observed in 7 of the 275 (2.5%) tortoises inspected.  During distance sampling surveys in 
the spring of 2001 and 2002 in the Fremont-Kramer and Superior-Cronese DWMAs, 6 of the 216 
(2.8%) tortoises inspected showed clinical evidence of disease.  These very similar, 
independently derived results (i.e., 2.5% versus 2.8% of the tortoises observed) are summarized 
in Table L-4. 
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Merge, combine, and consolidate multiple PDF files into one PDF file. Able to insert a blank page or multiple pages to PDF; Allow to delete any PDF Text Search.
how to select text in a pdf; pdf text search
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C# This example shows how to build a PDF document with three image files (BMP, JPEG
select text in pdf reader; how to select all text in pdf file
Appendices 
Table L-4.  Symptoms of URTD and Shell Disease Observed During Sign Count Surveys 
(1998-2001) and
Distance Sampling Surveys (Fremont-Kramer and Superior-Cronese in 
2001-2002) 
TORTOISES 
OBSERVED 
SURVEY TYPE  
& YEAR 
Gender 
Age Class 
DISEASE 
TYPE
1
COMMENTS 
Sign Count 1998 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Nares damp, eyes moist, chin glands enlarged 
Sign Count 1999 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Puffy eyelids 
Sign Count 2001 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Labored breathing, swollen eyelids 
Sign Count 2001 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Nose clear, but wheezy 
Sign Count 2001 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Wet around the eyes 
Dist. Samp. 2001 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Exudate in left nare 
Dist. Samp. 2001 
Female 
Adult 
URTD 
Raspy breathing 
Dist. Samp. 2002 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Chin glands and eyes swollen 
Dist. Samp. 2002 
Male 
Adult 
URTD 
Included in “nose discharge” in spread sheet 
Sign Count 1999 
Male 
Adult 
Lesions 
Severe lesions on 60% of the carapace; no URTD 
Sign Count 1998 
Female 
Adult 
Lesions 
Lesions on gular 
Dist. Samp. 2002 
Female 
Adult 
Lesions 
Trauma and dyskeratosis slight 
Dist. Samp. 2002 
Female 
Adult 
Lesions 
Appears that tort has been chewed on, but it could 
be from shell disease as well.  Damage not severe. 
8 MALE 
1 Female 
9 Adults 
URTD 
TOTALS 
1 MALE   
FEMALE 
4 Adults 
Lesions 
L.5  CARCASS OBSERVATION ANALYSIS 
L.5.1  Overview 
Carcass data were collected during the 1992 – 2002 sign count surveys and distance 
sampling surveys (2001 and 2002 in Fremont-Kramer and Superior-Cronese DWMAs).  The 
results are summarized below. 
Age Class of Carcasses:  Sign count data included 1,033 carcasses.  Age class was 
determined for 966 (94%) and could not be determined for 67 (6%).  Of the 966 carcasses where 
age class was given, 809 (84%) were adults and 157 (16%) were subadults. Distance sampling 
data included 764 carcasses, where age class was given for 460 (60%) and not given for 304 
(40%)
2
.  Of the 460 carcasses where age class was given, 387 (84%) were adults and 73 (16%) 
The comments given in the field notes are included in the 5
th
column.  One distance sampling male was listed in the 
Excel spread sheet in the “nose discharge” column, but no comments were included.  There were also nine distance 
sampling animals in 2001 under the spread sheet column called “Lesions.”  Comments included, “lesions due to 
trauma,” “pitting scutes on carapace and plastron, mites, and ticks,” and “some scutes peeling,” etc.  Dyskeratosis 
was not specifically mentioned, so none of these nine animals is included. 
The 2002 distance data were substantially affected by a higher incidence of unknown age classes recorded.  
Whereas, age class was unknown for only 36 of 283 (13%) carcasses found in 2001, age class was not recorded for 
268 of 481 (56%) carcasses found in 2002.  Consequently, percentages of both adult (i.e., 40% of 481 found) and 
subadult (i.e., 4%) carcasses were significantly lower in 2002 distance data than the other two data sets.  For 
comparison, sign count data included 78% adult and 15% subadult carcasses, and 2001 distance data included 69% 
adult and 18% subadult carcasses.  This survey artifact was accounted for in the text by reporting only the 
percentages of adult and subadult carcasses for those animals where age class was given. 
C# Create PDF from CSV to convert csv files to PDF in C#.net, ASP.
CSV files are saved to PDF documents by keeping original layout. Supports converting multiple sheets CSV file to one PDF or splitting to multiple PDF
how to select text in pdf image; pdf searchable text
Appendices 
were subadults.  Combined, there were 1,196 (84%) adult and 230 (16%) subadult carcasses 
among the 1,426 carcasses where age class was recorded. Of the 1,426 carcasses where age class 
was given, 1,196 (84%) were adults and 230 (16%) were subadults, a carcass adult-to-subadult 
ratio of 5.2:1. 
Although sign count surveys detected tortoises differentially based on season and gender, 
determination of age class was not affected.  Lower detection of subadults likely resulted in 
under-estimating the subadult component of the population, as previously described. Given these 
factors, live adults comprised 87% of the 275 tortoises detected, and adult carcasses comprised 
84% of those where age class could be determined.  Subadults comprised 13% of the live 
animals and 16% of the carcasses where age class was given.  These data indicate that the 
number of adult and subadult carcasses found is proportionate to the number of adult and 
subadult tortoises encountered.  This suggests that tortoise mortality of adults and subadults is 
proportionate to numbers of adult and subadult tortoises observed.  
L.5.2  Cause of Death 
Cause of Death: Cause of death was given for 104 of 1,033 (10%) carcasses found 
between 1998 and 2002 throughout the planning area.  Cause was given for 44 (6%) of the 764 
carcasses observed in the Fremont-Kramer and Superior-Cronese distance sampling surveys of 
2001 and 2002.   As such, 1,779 carcasses were found during the two survey efforts, and cause 
of death was given for 148 (8%) of them. These data are summarized in Table L-5. 
Table L-5 
Carcass Information Derived from 
Sign Count Data (1998-2001) & Distance Sampling Data (2001-2002) 
CAUSE OF DEATH GIVEN 
SURVEY 
TYPE 
NO 
OBS 
Major Causes of Identifiable Mortality 
Minor Causes of Identifiable Mortality 
Mammal 
Predation 
OHV 
Raven 
Gun 
Shot 
Tank 
Mine 
Shaft 
Camp 
Pet 
Gallst
one 
Sign 
Count 
104 
53 
51% 
28 
27% 
10 
9% 
8% 
3% 
0% 
1% 
1% 
0% 
Distance 
Sampling 
44 
23 
52% 
14 
32% 
7% 
2% 
0% 
3% 
0% 
0% 
2% 
TOTAL 
148 
76 
51% 
42 
28% 
13 
9% 
6% 
2% 
1% 
<1% 
<1% 
<1% 
The major causes of identified mortality occurred in the same descending order of 
prevalence for both survey efforts:  Mammalian Predation > Vehicle Crushing > Raven 
Predation > Shotgun.  With the exception of shotgun, relative occurrences of these four factors 
were strikingly similar for sign count and distance sampling: 51% vs. 52% for Mammalian 
Predation, 27% vs. 32% for Vehicle Crushing, and 9% vs. 7% for Raven Predation. Evidence of 
gunshot was observed in relatively more carcasses for sign count surveys (8%) than distance 
sampling (2%).  
Cause of Death Relative to DWMAs, Tortoise, and Vehicle Impact Areas:  Of the 
Appendices 
148 carcasses where cause of death was given, GIS-based spatial locations are used for 142
3
of 
them.  Therefore throughout the text, the numbers of carcasses with cause of death given relative 
to DWMAs, higher tortoise areas, and higher impact areas are relative to 142 (96%) rather than 
148 carcasses actually found.  
Table L-6 summarizes the distribution of 142 carcasses where cause of death was given, 
relative to locations surveyed inside or outside DWMAs, higher tortoise areas, and higher impact 
areas.  Since sign count and distance sampling data are combined, it is important to remember 
that all distance sampling was restricted to DWMAs, so there was relatively more survey effort 
inside compared to outside DWMAs.  Spatial distribution of these carcasses in and adjacent to 
the three DWMAs is shown on Map 3-15.  The map depicts 139 of 142 carcasses (98%), 
excluding two mammal-predated and one raven-predated carcass in the vicinity of Pinto 
Mountain; these three carcasses are included in the tabulated data.   
Table L-6 
Incidence of 142 Carcasses where Cause of Death Was Given 
In DWMAs, Higher Tortoise Areas, and Higher Vehicle Impact Areas 
MORTALITY FACTORS  
WHERE CAUSE OF DEATH GIVEN 
Area of Comparison 
Mammal 
Predation 
Vehicle 
Crushed 
Raven 
Predation 
Gunshot 
Tank 
Crushed 
Found in 
Mine Shaft 
Inside DWMA 
48 
24  
10  
8  
 
Outside DWMA 
25  
18  
3  
1  
 
2  
Inside Vehicle Impact Area 
13  
13  
3  
4  
N/A  
0  
Outside Vehicle Impact Area 
60  
29  
10  
5  
N/A 
2  
Inside Higher Tortoise Area 
12  
 
6  
2  
N/A  
0  
Outside Higher Tortoise Area 
61  
35  
7  
7  
N/A 
2  
Total for mortality factors 
73 
42 
13 
Interestingly, one of the three carcasses identified as being crushed by a tank was one 
mile south of the boundary of Fort Irwin, and two were within one mile north of the UTM 9-0 
line on the installation.  There were also 7 of 42 (17%) vehicle-crushed animals, 1 of 13 (8%) 
raven-predated, and 2 of 73 (3%) mammal-predated carcasses found on Fort Irwin.  These 13 
data points are dropped from the following analysis, as the intent is to characterize regions of 
BLM-managed lands.  Two tortoises were found in the same mine shaft near the southern 
boundary of Edwards Air Force Base. A single data point provides no insight into how often 
throughout the region tortoises may fall into mining pits and miscellaneous excavations. 
These values are useful in showing the raw data, but cannot be compared until the linear 
miles of survey effort are considered.  In Table L-6, the 129 carcasses (i.e., 142 above minus 13 
Fort Irwin carcasses) are divided by the number of transects surveyed inside and outside each of 
the three areas, as shown in the second column.  The resulting values in the third column are the 
Spatial data were not available for 3 sign count carcasses, each of which was associated with mammalian predation. 
There were three carcasses where the cause of death was questionable: 1 with a gallstone, 1 at a campsite, and 1 
captive release.  As such, these six carcasses are excluded, and discussion is relative to the remaining 142 carcasses, 
as described in the text. 
Appendices 
average number of each disturbance observed on transects within the region of comparison.  To 
facilitate comparison, the larger number is divided by the smaller, to indicate the occurrence 
within one area relative to the other.     
Table L-6.  Relative Incidence Of 129 Carcasses Where Cause Of Death Was Given: In 
DWMAs, Higher Tortoise Areas, And Higher Vehicle Impact Areas 
MORTALITY FACTORS  
WHERE CAUSE OF DEATH GIVEN 
No. Carcasses/No. Transects Surveyed in Area of Comparison 
(Higher Sum/Lower Sum = Prevalence in Higher Area) 
Area of Comparison 
No. Transects 
Surveyed 
Mammal 
Predation 
Vehicle 
Crushed 
Raven 
Predation 
Gunshot 
Inside DWMA 
1,572 
48 
24  
10  
 
Outside DWMA 
N/a 
23  
11  
 
 
Inside Vehicle Impact Area 
N/a 
13  
13  
 
 
Outside Vehicle Impact Area 
N/a 
58  
22  
 
Inside Higher Tortoise Area 
N/a 
12  
 
 
 
Outside Higher Tortoise Area 
N/a 
59  
28  
 
 
Total for mortality factors 
N/a 
71 
35 
12 
Cause of Death Relative to Gender and Age Class:  Table L-7 summarizes tortoise 
gender and age class for 104 sign count carcasses relative to the mortality factors given in the 
first column.  Percentages in the first column are relative to 104 carcasses; percentages in the 
other columns are relative to each mortality factor.   
Table L-7.  Gender and Age Classes of 104 Sign Count Carcasses Where the Cause of 
Death Was Given 
GENDER 
AGE CLASS 
Cause 
MALE 
Female 
Unk 
Adult 
SUBADULT 
Predation (53) 
51% 
15% 
19 
36% 
26 
49% 
31 
58% 
22 
42% 
OHV (28) 
27% 
21% 
32% 
13 
47% 
23 
85% 
4 (1 unk) 
15% 
Ravens (10) 
9% 
0% 
0% 
10 
100% 
0% 
10 
100% 
Gunshot (8) 
8% 
62% 
13% 
25% 
75% 
25% 
Tanks (3) 
3% 
0% 
3% 
4% 
67% 
33% 
Captive Release (1) 
1% 
5% 
0% 
0% 
100% 
0% 
Camp Site (1) 
1% 
0% 
3% 
0% 
100% 
0% 
104 
20 
19% 
31 
30% 
53 
51% 
64 
62% 
39 (1) 
38% 
One sees from these data that: 
Appendices 
•  Although about 1.5 times more carcasses were identified as females  (30%) than males 
(19%), gender was not determined for 51% (i.e., 53 of 104).  As such, results are 
inconclusive in demonstrating differential mortality between males and females.   
•  Vehicle crushing was identified for 27 carcasses, including 23 (85%) adults and 4 (15%) 
subadults.  The age class for one crushed carcass could not be determined. 
•  Evidence of gunshot was identified for 8 carcasses, including 6 (75%) adults and 2 (25%) 
subadults.  
•  Raven predation was only observed in subadult carcasses.  
•  The one carcass of a released captive and one carcass found at a campsite provide too 
little data to suggest that only adults would be affected by these mortality factors.  The 
carcass at the campsite may have been collected rather than killed, as the surveyor 
recorded no evidence of trauma. 
Time Since Death:  Carcasses may persist for as many as 20 years (Kristin Berry, pers. 
comm.).  However, they wear in such a way that the relative time since death can be estimated 
with some accuracy up to four years (Berry and Woodman 1984).  The diagnostic key developed 
by Berry and Woodman allows biologists to estimate the time since death as being less than one 
year, between one and two years, between two and four years, and greater then four years. 
Pertinent observations are given in Table L-8. 
Table L-8 
Patterns Observed In Carcasses That Were Fractured Or Predated 
CAUSE OF DEATH 
OBSERVATIONS 
INTERPRETATION 
Mammalian Predation 
47 of 53 (89%) died <4 years 
6 of 53 (11%) died >4 years 
Evidence for mammalian predation likely diminishes 
over time 
OHV Crushing 
21 of 28 (75%) died <4 years 
7 of 28 (25%) died >4 years 
Straight-line fractures persist over time, and may be 
more identifiable >4 years of death  
Raven Predation 
9 of 10 (90%) died <1 year 
1 no time since death given 
Detection diminishes with time; mammalian predators 
may scavenge carcasses 
Gunshot 
7 of 8 (88%) died <4 years 
1 of 8 (12%) died >4 years 
Concoidal fractures persist over time; may be less 
identifiable >4 years of death 
Of the 99 carcasses included in these four categories, 84 (85%) were newer (four or less 
years old) carcasses, 14 (14%) older (more than four years old) carcasses, and 1 (1%) where time 
since death was not given.  This suggests that diagnostic evidence for these mortality factors is 
more obvious in newer carcasses and diminishes with increased exposure.  
Of the 84 newer carcasses, 47 (56%) were attributed to mammalian predation (or 
scavenging), 21 (25%) to crushing, 9 (11%) to raven predation (or scavenging), and 7 (8%) to 
gunshot. It is noteworthy that all nine raven-predated tortoises had died within one year of being 
found.  This may suggest that mammalian scavengers wholly or partially consume subadult 
carcasses within a year or two of death.  If raven-predated carcasses generally do not persist for 
more than a year or two, the prevalence of raven predation given herein would underestimate the 
relative impact.  
Of the 14 older carcasses, 6 (43%) were attributed to mammalian predation, 7 (50%) to 
crushing, and 1 (7%) to gunshot.  Evidence for these forms of mortality is persistent. Mammals 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested