how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : Search text in pdf image software control dll winforms web page windows web forms Vol-2-Complete-Bookmarks29-part2014

Appendices 
often leave chew marks on the carcasses, or if freshly eaten, footprints may be seen in the soil 
around the carcass.   
Both vehicle crushing and gunshot wounds result in shell fractures.  Such fractures are 
the most persistent, although they would not be observable on extremely old carcasses, which 
may resemble a pile of chalk.  This persistence is suggested by the relatively high percentage of 
older carcasses that were crushed (25%) compared to other categories (i.e., gunshot was next 
highest at 12%).   However, between the two, concoidal gunshot fractures are much more 
difficult to see than are straight-line fractures associated with crushing. 
Limitations Interpreting Carcass Data:  One must be very careful interpreting and 
reporting these data for the following reasons.  Primarily, the cause of death was not given for 
1,636 carcasses, or about 92% of the 1,797 carcasses found.  It is important that identified 
mortality factors are only relative to a small proportion of carcasses observed during each survey 
effort.  Cause of death was given for 10% of the sign count carcasses, 6% of the distance 
sampling carcasses, and only 8% of carcasses observed during both survey efforts. One correct 
conclusion would be, “27% of identified tortoise mortality [i.e., 148 of 1,797 (8%) carcasses 
found] was attributed to vehicle crushing;” it would be incorrect and misleading to 
conclude,“27% of tortoise mortality was attributed to vehicle crushing.”  
Limitations Interpreting Mammalian Predation: The relative occurrence of 
mammalian predation reflected in these data is likely overestimated for the following reasons.  
Carcasses were mostly identified as being predated, rather than scavenged.  Evidence such as 
teeth marks on marginal scutes, chewed-off gular horns, etc. was most often interpreted as 
predation, when in fact scavenging leaves behind the same or similar marks. The data indicate 
that mammalian predation was mostly observed in fresher carcasses.  Fresher carcasses are far 
more likely to be scavenged than older ones.  
Limitations Interpreting Vehicle Crushing:  These data may result in over-estimates of 
current impacts, but would be more indicative of the spatial location, relative to other factors. 
The data suggest that carcasses are relatively long lasting (i.e., compared to raven-predated 
carcasses, and some evidence of mammal predation).  If they persist for 20 years, as suggested, 
older and new carcasses would accumulate and tend to over-estimate the current impacts.  The 
cumulative information is important to show where such impacts have occurred for up to 20 
years, and still occur.  It is likely more reflective of impact distribution than any of the other 
mortality data.  
If undisturbed, a tortoise carcass will naturally fall apart within a year or two.  Bones 
separate at natural divisions called “sutures,” which is particularly true for bone plates in the 
carapace (top) and plastron (bottom) of the tortoise shell. Trauma to living and dead tortoises 
results in readily identifiable shell fractures and fragments.  Fragments will often adhere together 
when a living animal is crushed, but not always.  Even very small fragments often have straight-
line edges that are readily differentiated from the small, jagged edges of bone that has fallen 
apart naturally. In general, these and other diagnostic characteristics significantly minimize 
surveyor subjectivity.  Vehicles are the most likely objects in the desert to crush tortoises, 
Search text in pdf image - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf find highlighted text; search pdf documents for text
Search text in pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
cannot select text in pdf; pdf searchable text converter
Appendices 
although cattle trampling and tank crushing do occur.  Therefore, it is important to consider the 
region in which crushed carcasses were found.  
For vehicle crushing, mammalian predation, and raven predation there is the common 
issue of whether a living versus a dead animal was affected.  In the case of crushing, which is 
relatively easy to identify due to straight-line fractures, the difference is not so critical.  In either 
case, a tortoise was crushed.  
Limitations Interpreting Raven Predation:  These data likely underestimate the 
relative impact, are useful in identifying areas where predation has recently occurred, and do 
not show the regional distribution. Raven predation is diagnostic; occurrences under nests and 
perch sites facilitate positive identification. Data indicate that no older carcasses were found; all 
nine were estimated as occurring within one year. This shortened detection period would lend to 
underestimating the relative impact. Some actual raven predation may be obscured by 
subsequent mammalian predation. These data do not show regional distributions, which would 
require focused surveys for nests and indicate how many of them have evidence.  However, in 
spite of small sample size and these other limitations, it is compelling that 75% of 12 raven-
predated carcasses occurred within higher density areas, where 43% of all subadults were 
observed. 
L.5.3  Distribution of Carcasses where Cause of Death Is Known 
Fremont-Kramer DWMA:   Some of the 129 carcasses with cause of death given were 
found within die-off regions; both sign count and distance sampling data are used (see Table 
L.9). Of the 129 carcasses, 14 (11%) occurred within Fremont-Kramer die-off regions.  
Table L-9.  Occurrence of 14 Carcasses where Cause of Death Was Given In the Fremont-
Kramer Older and Newer Die-off Regions 
REGION  
NO. & NAME 
AGE OF 
DIE-
OFF 
NO. CARCASSES FOR EACH  
IDENTIFIED MORTALITY FACTOR  
Mammal 
Predated 
Vehicle 
Crushed 
Raven 
Predated 
Gunshot 
Other 
OLDER REGIONS NORTH OF HIGHWAY 58 
FK1. DTNA 
Older 
N/A 
FK2. Cuddeback 
Older 
N/A 
FK3. California City 
Older 
1 carcass of pet tortoise  
FK4. NE Kramer Jct 
Older 
N/A 
TOTALS 
1 pet 
NEWER REGION BISECTED BY AND SOUTH OF HIGHWAY 58 
FK5. N of HWY 58  
Newer 
N/A 
FK6. S of HWY 58  
Newer 
N/A 
FK7. Edwards Bowl 
Newer 
N/A 
TOTALS 
N/A 
Superior-Cronese DWMA:  Of the 129 carcasses, 26 (20%) occurred within Superior-
Cronese die-off regions (see L-10).   
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
pdf text search tool; text select tool pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
make pdf text searchable; convert pdf to searchable text online
Appendices 
Table L-10 
Occurrence of 26 Carcasses where Cause of Death Was Given  
In the Superior-Cronese Newer and Older Die-off Regions 
REGION 
NO. & NAME 
AGE OF 
DIE-
OFF 
NO. CARCASSES FOR EACH  
IDENTIFIED MORTALITY FACTOR  
Mammal 
Predated 
Vehicle 
Crushed 
Raven 
Predated 
Gunshot 
Other 
SC1 
Newer 
N/A 
SC2 
Newer 
1 with gallstone 
SC3 
Newer 
N/A 
SC4 
Newer 
N/A 
SC5 
Newer 
N/A 
SC6 
Newer 
1 crushed by tank 
SC7 
Newer 
N/A 
SC8 
Older 
N/A 
TOTALS 
13 
2 others 
Summary of All Carcass Observations:  A summary of sign count carcasses segregated 
by die-off region is presented in Table L-11.  Region-wide, there were of 420 mi
2
of die-offs, 
including 279 mi
2
(66%) of newer die-offs and 141 mi
2
(34%) of older die-offs; given the 
overlap of 29 mi
2
, there were a total of 391 mi
2
affected by both newer and older die-offs.  This 
indicates that about 3.5% of the 2002 tortoise range (391 of 11,134 mi
2
), or 11.6% of the 
surveyed area (391 of 3,362 mi
2
), were within older and newer die-off regions.   
A total of 600 carcasses was found within the die-off regions (59% of the 1,011 carcasses 
where coordinate information was available), including 388 (65%) newer carcasses and 212 
(35%) older carcasses.  This is a significant finding, indicating that tortoises are continuing to die 
throughout the planning area, particularly in the Superior-Cronese DWMA, and probably since 
about 1990.  Newer die-off regions were characterized by 317 (85%) newer carcasses and 54 
(15%) older carcasses; older die-off regions were characterized by 158 (69%) older carcasses 
and 71 (31%) newer carcasses.  These latter findings suggest that tortoises continue to die in 
older die-off regions, even though older carcasses were twice as likely to be found as newer 
ones. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
pdf editor with search and replace text; text searchable pdf file
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
searching pdf files for text; find and replace text in pdf file
Appendices 
Table L-11.  Sign Count Carcasses Segregated By Die-Off Region* 
REGION  DIE-OFF 
AREA (MI
2
TOTAL 
CARCASSES 
NEW 
CARCASSES 
OLD CARCASSES 
Fremont-Kramer 
FK1 
Newer 
13 
30 
13 (43%) 
17 (57%) 
Older 
50 
72 
14 (19%) 
58 (81%) 
FK2 
Newer 
11 
7 (64%) 
4 (36%) 
Older 
36 
53 
12 (23%) 
41 (77%) 
FK3 
Newer 
5 (100%) 
Older 
22 
21 
21 (100%) 
FK4 
Newer 
5 (71%) 
2 (29%) 
Older 
15 
24 
8 (33%) 
16 (67%) 
FK5 
Newer 
32 
37 
29 (78%) 
8 (22%) 
FK6 
Newer 
19 
26 
25 (96%) 
1 (4%) 
FK7 
Newer 
4 (100%) 
Superior-Cronese 
SC1 
Newer 
27 
29 
23 (79%) 
6 (21%) 
SC2 
Newer 
22 
24 
18 (75%) 
6 (25%) 
SC3 
Newer 
11 
13 
12 (92%) 
1 (8%) 
SC4 
Newer 
10 
13 
12 (92%) 
1 (8%) 
SC5 
Newer 
23 
35 
30 (86%) 
5 (14%) 
Older 
4 (50%) 
4 (50%) 
SC6 
Newer 
56 
99 
85 (86%) 
14 (14%) 
Older 
26 
15 (58%) 
11 (42%) 
SC7 
Newer 
16 
27 
25 (93%) 
2 (7%) 
SC8 
Older 
1 (13%) 
7 (87%) 
Ord-Rodman 
OR1 
Newer 
8 (89%) 
1 (11%) 
OR2 
Newer 
4 (100%) 
OR3 
Newer 
18 
15 
12 (80%) 
3 (20%) 
Total 
Newer 279 
Older 141 
420 
Newer 388 (65%) 
Older 212 (35%) 
600 (59%) of 1,011 
Newer 317 (85%) 
Older 54 (15%) 
371 (62%) of 600 
Newer 71 (31%) 
Older 158 (69%) 
229 (38%) of 600 
L.6  RELATIVE TORTOISE OCCURRENCE IN OPEN AREAS 
There are eight BLM open areas within the planning area, including Johnson Valley, 
Stoddard Valley, El Mirage, Spangler Hills, Jawbone Canyon, Dove Springs, Rasor, and 
Olancha.  Of these, Johnson, Stoddard, El Mirage, and Spangler Hills are located well within the 
2002 tortoise range.  The boundary of the range bisects Jawbone Canyon and Dove Springs, with 
most of Jawbone west of the range.  Rasor is on the eastern edge of the range, but tortoise habitat 
occurs east of there.  The Olancha Open Area is outside the range.  
Previously Documented Impacts:  Stow (1988) assessed vehicle impacts in the 
Stoddard Valley, Johnson Valley, and Rasor open areas by comparing aerial photographs taken 
in 1977 and again in 1988.  He found that Stoddard Valley had the greatest percent area 
disturbed and the greatest percent increase in OHV disturbances among the three areas.  He 
reported that Stoddard Valley was used predominantly for competitive events.  In the Johnson 
Valley Open Area, he found that competition, recreation, pitting, and camping were concentrated 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
convert pdf to searchable text; pdf text searchable
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
pdf find text; pdf search and replace text
Appendices 
to the southwest (in the vicinity of Anderson Dry Lake, east of the Cinnamon Hills), and that 
northeastern portions were relatively inaccessible and little used.  He indicated that, in 1988, 
about 94% of both the Stoddard Valley and Johnson Valley open areas had been disturbed by 
OHV activities, which represented a 25% increase since 1977. 
Sign Count Surveys in Open Areas:  Portions of the six open areas were surveyed 
between 1998 and 2002 for tortoise sign and human disturbances.  The acreage, square miles 
surveyed, and percentage of each open area surveyed are given in Table L-11. 
Table L-11.  Portions of BLM Open Areas Surveyed Between 1998 and 2002
OPEN AREA 
TOTAL ACREAGE 
(SQUARE MILES) 
AREA SURVEYED 
(SQUARE MILES) 
PERCENT OF OPEN AREA 
SURVEYED 
Johnson Valley 
294 
231  
79% 
Spangler Hills 
97 
75 
77% 
Stoddard Valley 
85 
63  
74% 
Rasor 
35 
26  
74% 
Dove Springs 
 
50% 
El Mirage 
40 
16  
40% 
Jawbone 
13 
0% 
Regional Occurrence of Tortoises in Open Areas and DWMAs:  There are four higher 
density tortoise areas in the Johnson Valley Open Area.  Two of these are contiguous to the Ord-
Rodman DWMA.  Higher density areas are also found throughout much of the northern part of 
the Stoddard Valley Open Area.  These are contiguous to higher density areas east of Highway 
247, along Lenwood Wash and south.  There are no other overlaps, although several square 
miles of higher density areas were found immediately northwest of Spangler Hills.  Table L-12 
compares the number of tortoises observed within each open area, and the associated encounter 
rates
4
.  Results observed in adjacent DWMAs are given for comparison.  
Table L-12.  Relative Numbers Of Sign Count Tortoises Observed in Six BLM Open Areas 
and Three Adjacent DWMAs 
Tortoises in Open areas  
TORTOISES IN ADJACENT DWMAS 
OPEN 
AREA 
LINEAR 
MI  
No. 
Live 
ENCOUNTER 
RATE 
MI TO 
SEE 
DWMA  LINEAR 
MI  
NO. 
LIVE 
ENCOUNTER 
RATE 
MI TO 
SEE 
Johnson 
Valley  
346.5 
0.023 
43.3 
Stoddard 
Valley  
94.5 
0.095 
10.5 
Ord-
Rodman 
352.5 
29  
0.082 
12.1 
El Mirage  
24.0 
0.125 
8.0 
Spangler 
Hills  
112.5 
0.018 
56.2 
Fremont-
Kramer  
858.0 
46  
0.054 
18.6 
Linear miles in the 2
nd
column were derived by multiplying the total number of transects by 1.5 (i.e. each transect 
was 1.5 miles long). Encounter rates indicate the number of live animals observed relative to the linear miles 
surveyed.  These calculations indicate the number of tortoises observed per linear mile of transect.  The “MI TO 
SEE” column was determined by dividing the linear miles of survey (2
nd
columns in open area and DWMA 
subsections) by the number of tortoises observed along those transects.   
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR component. Professional PDF to text converting library
search multiple pdf files for text; how to search text in pdf document
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
The following demo code will show how to replace text in specified PDF page. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Set the search options.
how to select all text in pdf; cannot select text in pdf file
Appendices 
Dove 
Springs  
4.5 
N/A 
N/A   
Rasor  
39.0 
N/A 
N/A  Superior-
Cronese  
1,083.0 
79  
0.073 
13.7 
Total 
520 
22 
0.042 
23.6 
Total 
2,293.5 
154 
0.067 
14.9 
The number of animals observed in a given area is not meaningful until the relative level 
of survey effort is factored in, which is shown in the “Encounter Rate” and “MI TO SEE” 
columns.  No tortoises were observed in the Dove Springs and Rasor open areas, however the 
transect lengths were relatively small. These data do not indicate that tortoises are absent in these 
two open areas.  Rather, they indicate that a surveyor would need to walk more than 4.5 miles in 
Dove Springs and more than 39 miles in Rasor to encounter a tortoise.   
Encounter rates are given so that sign count surveys in DWMAs can be compared with 
distance sampling surveys of 2001.  In 2001, distance sampling encounter rates were 0.111 
tortoises per linear mile surveyed in the Ord-Rodman, 0.090 in the Fremont-Kramer, and 0.071 
in the Superior Cronese DWMAs.  The encounter rate for sign count surveys in the Superior-
Cronese DWMA was the same as that observed during distance sampling (i.e., 0.073 and 0.071). 
The other two distance sampling rates are somewhat higher for the Ord-Rodman (0.111 versus 
0.082, 1.3 times higher) and Fremont-Kramer (0.090 versus 0.054, 1.7 times higher) DWMAs.  
Another comparison is provided for in the “MI TO SEE” column, which uses sign count 
data.  This column reports the distance a surveyor had to walk to see the number of tortoises 
indicated in the third column for both open areas and adjacent DWMAs.  The figure given for El 
Mirage (8.0 miles to see one tortoise) is not reflective of higher tortoise densities because only 
24 linear miles were surveyed.  The sample size (i.e., transect length) is too small for this 
number to be meaningful.  One interpretation is the limited number of transects surveyed 
occurred in an area of relative tortoise abundance, although no higher density areas were 
identified using methodologies previously described.  Sample sizes were sufficiently large for 
Johnson Valley, Stoddard Valley, and Spangler Hills to make the following comparisons 
meaningful. 
Tortoise encounters were the highest in the Stoddard Valley Open Area, where on 
average one tortoise was observed for every 10.5 miles walked.  This may be reflective of the 
higher density tortoise areas that were observed in much of the northern portion of this open 
area.  Eight tortoises were found within or adjacent to these higher density areas, including one 
subadult to the north, which suggests recruitment.   
Data for the Johnson Valley Open Area indicate that a surveyor had to walk four times 
farther, compared to Stoddard Valley (i.e., 43.3 miles versus 10.5 miles), to see one tortoise.  
Data suggest that there are relatively fewer tortoises per square mile in the Johnson Valley than 
in the Stoddard Valley open area.  These data corroborate numerous other observations that 
tortoises are relatively less common in the Spangler Hills open area, compared to Johnson 
Valley, Stoddard Valley, and El Mirage.  
The final comparison is between open areas and adjacent DWMAs.  When combined, 
Appendices 
one sees that tortoises were encountered about 1.6 times more often in DWMAs than in open 
areas (i.e., one tortoise observed every 14.9 miles in DWMAs versus one every 23.6 miles in 
open areas).  The data suggest that tortoises are somewhat less frequently encountered in the 
Fremont-Kramer DWMA compared to the other two.  However, the relatively low variability 
among the three DWMAs (i.e., 12.1, 13.7, and 18.6 miles to see one tortoise) suggests that they 
are relatively similar. Dr. Krzysik (2002a, b, c), in fact, concluded that population densities in 
these three DWMAs were not significantly different. 
For comparison, the variability among open areas (i.e., from 8.0 to 56.2 miles to see a 
tortoise) suggests that population levels may be substantially different.  Too few data are 
available to indicate the relative abundance in the El Mirage Open Area.  However, the data do 
suggest that tortoises may be relatively more common, per unit area, in the Stoddard Valley 
Open Area than in the three DWMAs.  Unlike the Fremont-Kramer and Superior-Cronese 
DWMAs where die-offs have decimated local and regional populations, no such die-off was 
found at Stoddard Valley.  If die-offs were in response to URTD, the data suggest that tortoises 
in the Stoddard Valley are relatively disease-free.  It may be significant that, like the Ord-
Rodman DWMA, this open area is physically separated from populations that may have crashed 
due to disease. 
The data suggest the following descending order of tortoise abundance in the four open 
areas: Stoddard Valley > Johnson Valley > El Mirage > Spangler Hills.  
Relative Occurrence of Carcasses in Open Areas and DWMAs:  The same types of 
comparisons and methodologies reported above for live tortoises were also applied to the sign 
count carcass data.  Comparisons are given in Table L-13. 
Table L-13.  Relative Numbers Of Sign Count Carcasses Observed In Six BLM Open 
Areas And Three Adjacent DWMAs 
CARCASSES IN OPEN AREAS  
CARCASSES IN ADJACENT DWMAS 
OPEN 
AREA 
LINEAR 
MI  
NO. 
DEAD 
ENCOUNTER 
RATE 
MI TO 
SEE 
DWMA  LINEAR 
MI  
NO. 
DEAD 
ENCOUNTER 
RATE 
MI TO 
SEE 
Johnson 
Valley  
346.5 
66 
0.190 
5.25 
Stoddard 
Valley  
94.5 
11 
0.116 
8.59 
Ord-
Rodman 
352.5 
51  
0.145 
6.91 
El Mirage  
24.0 
0.208 
4.8 
Spangler 
Hills  
112.5 
0.080 
12.5 
Dove 
Springs  
4.5 
N/A 
N/A 
Fremont-
Kramer  
858.0 
324  
0.378 
2.65 
Rasor  
39.0 
N/A 
N/A  Superior-
Cronese  
1,083.0 
359  
0.331 
3.02 
Total 
520 
91 
0.175 
5.71 
Total 
2,293.5 
734 
0.320 
3.13 
Overall, carcasses were much more commonly observed than live animals.  These are not 
data sets that were independently collected (i.e., as with distance sampling versus sign count 
data); 275 live animals and 1,033 carcasses were found along the same transects.  One might 
suggest that the prevalence of carcasses over live animals is due to the longevity of carcasses, 
Appendices 
which may persist up to 20 years.  However, tortoises are also long-lived animals, with 
individuals that are known to live for more than 20 years in the wild
5
There were 91 carcasses found in open areas and 734 found in DWMAs.  When the 
relative survey effort is considered, there were about two times as many (i.e., 1.82) carcasses 
found in DWMAs as in open areas.  For comparison, surveyors walked an average of 5.7 miles 
in an open area to find one carcass, compared to 3.1 miles in the three DWMAs.  This may be 
due to catastrophic die-offs in DWMAs, which have not been observed in open areas. 
Among open areas, the data indicate that there are relatively more carcasses found in the 
Johnson Valley, followed by Stoddard Valley, and Spangler Hills.  Not enough linear miles of 
transects were surveyed in El Mirage for it to be compared among these three, where sample 
sizes were relatively large.   
There is an inverse relationship between the number of tortoises and carcasses observed 
in DWMAs.  Tortoises were more often encountered in the Ord-Rodman (i.e., one tortoise for 
every 12.1 miles of survey), followed by Superior-Cronese (i.e., one per 13.7 miles), and 
Fremont-Kramer (i.e., one per 18.6 miles).  An opposite pattern was observed for carcasses: one 
carcass encountered per 2.65 miles in Fremont-Kramer, one per 3.02 miles in Superior-Cronese, 
and one per 6.91 miles in Ord-Rodman.  This suggests that tortoises were most likely to be 
encountered in a DWMA where fewer carcasses were found.  The converse conclusion is that 
fewer tortoises were found where there were more carcasses. 
Although this may seem like a trivial point, it is not.  It is entirely likely that carcasses 
may be more common in places where live animals are more common.  Relatively more 
carcasses were seen in the western part of Johnson Valley Open Area, in the northwest part of 
the Ord-Rodman DWMA, and in the Water Valley/Mud Hills area.  However, each of them was 
associated with a higher density tortoise area; carcasses were relatively less common than in 
identified die-off regions.  
Table L-14 shows an inverse relationship between tortoise and carcass encounters 
between Stoddard Valley and three DWMAs, a relationship not observed in Johnson Valley.   
5
Boarman (pers. comm.) found one report of a pet tortoise that was more than 60 years old.  There is at least one 
animal marked at one of the DTNA study plots in 1979 that was still alive in 2002 (M. Connor, pers. comm.).  He 
did not indicate if it was an adult in 1979, but this animal is at least 23 years old.  Except for anecdotal accounts, 
there are no data to indicate the average longevity of tortoises at the population level.  It is reasonable to assume that 
many adult tortoises live substantially longer in the wild than 20 years. 
Appendices 
Table L-14.  Tortoise and Carcass Encounters in Open Areas and DWMAs 
AREA OF COMPARISON 
ONE TORTOISE 
OBSERVED EVERY 
ONE CARCASS 
OBSERVED EVERY 
Stoddard Valley 
10.5 mi 
8.59 mi 
Ord-Rodman DWMA 
12.1 mi 
6.91 mi 
Superor-Cronese 
13.7 mi 
3.02 mi 
Fremont-Kramer 
18.6 mi 
2.65 mi 
Johnson Valley 
43.3 mi 
5.25 mi 
These observations suggest that carcass abundance decreases in the following manner:   
Fremont-Kramer > Superior-Cronese > Ord-Rodman > Stoddard Valley  
The pattern of relatively more tortoises where there are relatively few carcasses was not 
seen in the Johnson Valley Open Area.  It took about four times as much effort to find a tortoise 
than in Stoddard Valley Open Area (i.e., the easiest place) and twice as long as in the Fremont-
Kramer DWMA (i.e., the next hardest place).  This indicates that the tortoise population – on a 
regional level – is relatively sparse, with denser areas to the west, adjacent to the Ord-Rodman 
DWMA.  No recent or older die-offs were detected, nor do the data indicate why the population 
is less dense now than previously.   
Dr. Berry documented a 77% decline between 1980 and 1994 on the Johnson Valley 
study plot, which is within the open area.  All other such declines have occurred in the Fremont-
Kramer and Superior-Cronese DWMAs.  The two study plots showing the smallest declines 
were Lucerne Valley (i.e., 30% decrease between 1980 and 1994) and Stoddard Valley (5% 
between 1981 and 1991).  All three of these areas are located west of Interstate 15.   
Carcass encounters in Johnson Valley was intermediate between Ord-Rodman and 
Fremont-Kramer.  As such, Johnson Valley may be inserted into the previous formula, which is 
given in descending order of carcass abundance:  
Fremont-Kramer > Johnson Valley > Superior-Cronese > Ord-Rodman > Stoddard Valley 
If disease has spread through tortoise populations west of Interstate 15, it would not 
spread to the tortoise populations east of the interstate (unless facilitated by unauthorized 
translocation).  Although this has conservation benefits, the relatively small sizes of tortoise 
concentration areas in the Ord-Mountain also places them at heightened risk.  Should they 
become extirpated, the sparse population in the Johnson Valley may provide for limited natural 
repatriation.  The tortoises in the open area are likely to be more heavily impacted as the human 
population (and recreation) increases, which would further minimize emigration potential.  
In summary, the data suggest the following descending order of relative tortoise 
abundance:  
Stoddard Valley > Ord-Rodman DWMA > Superor-Cronese > Fremont-Kramer > Johnson 
Valley 
Appendices 
Compared to the following ascending order of relative carcass abundance: 
Stoddard Valley < Ord-Rodman < Superior-Cronese < Johnson Valley < Fremont-Kramer  
These relationships become much more significant when one considers the relative area 
within each of these regions that was surveyed, and therefore reflective of the above 
comparisons. 
Local Occurrence of Tortoises in the Fremont-Kramer DWMA:  These comparisons 
are on a regional level, and suggest that outside the Johnson Valley Open Area, the most difficult 
place to find tortoises is in the Fremont-Kramer.  However, the population within that DWMA is 
not homogenous in terms of tortoise distribution.  Both current data and older data support the 
conclusion that there have been significant population declines in the northern and northwestern 
portions of the Fremont-Kramer DWMA.   
For these reasons, comparisons similar to those given above for the five larger regions 
are given in Table L-15 areas north and south of Highway 58 in the Fremont-Kramer DWMA. 
Table L-15 
Relative Numbers of Tortoises and Carcasses  
Observed in the Fremont-Kramer DWMA  
North and South of Highway 58 
TORTOISE DATA 
CARCASS DATA 
AREA  LINE
AR 
MI  
NO. 
DEAD 
ENCOUNTER 
RATE 
MI TO 
SEE 
AREA 
LINEAR 
MI  
NO. 
DEAD 
ENCOUNTER 
RATE 
MI TO 
SEE 
North 
North 
South 
South 
Total 
Total 
Characteristics of Vehicle Impact Areas:  The types and intensity of impacts 
associated with each region are listed in Tables L-16, L-17 and l-18 and discussed below.   
Recreational Impact Regions – BLM Open Areas: Open areas compared in the following 
table include Dove Springs/Jawbone Canyon (combined), Johnson Valley, Stoddard Valley, 
Spangler Hills, and El Mitage..  There are five columns for each of the seven types of 
disturbance data collected on sign count surveys, 1998-2002; where there are only four columns, 
the total mi
to the left applies.  Data include (1) “Total mi
2
,” which are all square miles surveyed 
within the impact region. (2) “Mi
2
Obs., which is the subset of square miles wherein the given 
disturbance was observed.  (3) “Sum,” is the total number of disturbances observed. (4) 
“Average” is the Sum/Mi
2
Obs.  (5) “Range” indicates the lowest and highest value for a given 
disturbance.  Except where “0” is entered, the lower range limit is always 1, since there must be 
at least one observation for the transect to be included.  For example, in Johnson Valley, there 
were 296 mi
surveyed, with a sum of 49,394 vehicle cross-country tracks, occurring on 296 mi
2
for an average of 180 tracks/ mi
2
, ranging from as few as 1 track up to 1,625.  As in other places, 
numbers of square miles equates to the number of transects surveyed.   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested