Appendices 
Table L-16.  Open Area Vehicle Impact Regions 
Area 
Total 
mi
2
Mi
2
Obs 
Sum  Ave  Range 
Mi
2
Obs 
Sum 
Ave 
Range 
TRAILS 
TRACKS 
Dove/Jawbone 
24 
24 
370  15.4 
4-52 
22 
406 
18.5 
1-180 
Spangler 
131  121  2336  19.3  1-103 
127  12140  95.6 
2-2665 
El Mirage 
21 
19 
322  16.9 
1-51 
19 
2294  120.7 
2-418 
Stoddard 
119 
99 
1186  12.0 
1-76 
105  14675  138.9 
1-4000 
Johnson Valley 
296  231  5203  22.5  1-250 
275  49394  179.6 
1-1625 
Total 
591  494  9417  19.1  1-250 
548  78909  144.0 
1-4000 
LITTER 
DUMPS 
Dove/Jawbone 
24 
22 
381  17.3 
1-63 
Spangler 
131  121  4734  39.1  1-525 
El Mirage 
21 
20 
437  21.9 
1-75 
Stoddard 
119  115  4132  35.9  1-700 
Johnson Valley 
296  271  11135  41.1  1-1080 
Total 
591  549  20819  37.9  1-1080 
TARGET 
HUNTING 
Dove/Jawbone 
24 
16 
281  17.6  1-142 
1.0 
Spangler 
131 
56 
1006  18.0  1-110 
12 
13 
1.1 
1-2 
El Mirage 
21 
12 
136  11.3 
1-32 
14 
2.3 
1-5 
Stoddard 
119 
30 
310  10.3 
1-97 
21 
64 
3.0 
1-18 
Johnson Valley 
296 
99 
1723  17.4  1-325 
21 
34 
1.6 
1-6 
Total 
591  213  3456  16.2  1-325 
61 
126 
2.1 
1-18 
CAMPING 
Dove/Jawbone 
24 
2.5 
1-4 
Spangler 
131 
18 
2.4 
1-6 
El Mirage 
21 
1.0 
Stoddard 
119 
28 
52 
1.9 
1-5 
Johnson Valley 
296 
27 
84 
3.1 
1-25 
Total 
591 
66 
161 
2.4 
1-25 
Pdf text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select text in pdf reader; pdf find and replace text
Pdf text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
converting pdf to searchable text format; how to make a pdf document text searchable
Appendices 
Recreational Impact Regions – Higher OHV Use Areas: The following table compares 
vehicle impacts at California City to Rand Mountains, Edwards Bowl, and East Sierra de facto 
open areas.  
Table L-17.  Higher OHV Use Vehicle Impact Regions 
Area 
Total 
mi
2
Mi
2
Obs 
Sum  Ave  Range  Mi
2
Obs 
Sum 
Ave 
Range 
TRAILS 
TRACKS 
Cal City/Rands 
168  110  878 
8.0 
1-35 
156 
8162 
52.3 
1-585 
Edwards Bowl 
14 
12 
66 
5.5 
1-14 
14 
599 
42.8 
7-80 
East Sierra 
31 
10 
1.7 
1-2 
14 
142 
10.1 
1-76 
Total 
213  128  954 
7.4 
1-35 
184 
8903 
48.3 
1-585 
LITTER 
DUMPS 
Cal City/Rands 
168  156  3295  21.1  1-159 
Edwards Bowl 
14 
13 
216  16.6  2-53 
East Sierra 
31 
30  1429  47.6  3-305 
Total 
213  199  4940  24.8  1-305 
TARGET 
HUNTING 
Cal City/Rands 
168 
76 
498 
6.5 
1-36 
19 
28 
1.5 
1-4 
Edwards Bowl 
14 
1.7 
1-2 
11 
1.8 
1-3 
East Sierra 
31 
19 
150 
7.8 
1-53 
Total 
213 
98 
653 
6.7 
1-53 
25 
39 
1.6 
1-4 
CAMPING 
Cal City/Rands 
168 
14 
21 
1.5 
1-3 
Edwards Bowl 
14 
1.0 
East Sierra 
31 
Total 
213 
15 
22 
1.5 
0-3 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
search a pdf file for text; how to select text in pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
how to search a pdf document for text; pdf text search
Appendices 
Residential Impact Regions: The following residential impact areas are compared in the 
table below:  Silver Lakes, Hinkley, and Coyote Corner.   
Table L-18.  Residential Vehicle Impact Regions 
Area 
Total 
mi
2
Mi
2
Obs 
Sum  Ave 
Range 
Mi
2
Obs 
Sum 
Ave 
Range 
TRAILS 
TRACKS 
Silver Lakes 
37 
22 
74 
3.4 
1-22 
34 
435 
12.8 
1-49 
Hinkley 
31 
13 
66 
5.1 
1-18 
26 
387 
14.9 
1-101 
Coyote Corner 
39 
14 
51 
3.6 
1-10 
34 
1939 
57.0 
2-341 
Total 
107 
49 
191 
3.9 
1-22 
94 
2761 
29.4 
1-341 
LITTER 
DUMPS 
Silver Lakes 
37 
35  1178  33.7 
1-300 
1.0 
Hinkley 
31 
24  2492  103.8  1-1000 
Coyote Corner 
39 
38  2004  52.7 
1-725 
1.2 
1-2 
Total 
107 
97  5674  58.6  1-1000 
1.2 
0-2 
TARGET 
HUNTING 
Silver Lakes 
37 
25 
154 
6.2 
1-37 
10 
33 
3.3 
1-8 
Hinkley 
31 
1.8 
1-3 
14 
1.8 
1-3 
Coyote Corner 
39 
19 
713 
37.5 
1-525 
1.6 
1-4 
Total 
107 
48 
874 
18.2 
1-525 
23 
55 
2.4 
1-8 
CAMPING 
Silver Lakes 
37 
1.0 
Hinkley 
31 
1.8 
1-4 
Coyote Corner 
39 
1.8 
1-3 
Total 
107 
10 
16 
1.6 
1-4 
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
for VB.NET provides users fast and accurate image recognition function, which converts scanned images into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD
search pdf files for text; search pdf files for text programmatically
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
keeping original layout. VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
how to select text in pdf and copy; search text in pdf image
Appendices 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi empowered to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
convert pdf to word searchable text; search text in pdf using java
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
can't select text in pdf file; select text pdf file
Appendices 
APPENDIX M 
MOJAVE GROUND SQUIRREL 
BACKGROUND DATA
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
search pdf files for text programmatically; search text in pdf using java
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Free .NET library for
converting pdf to searchable text format; pdf text select tool
Appendices 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality Professional .NET PDF batch conversion control. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
pdf text search tool; convert pdf to searchable text
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from
text select tool pdf; pdf searchable text
Appendices 
APPENDIX M 
MOHAVE GROUND SQUIRREL 
BACKGROUND DATA 
M.1  STATUS OF MGS 
The current, 2002 status of the MGS, in terms of numbers of individuals and amount of 
occupied habitat, cannot be assessed based on the limitations of available data.  For example, 
Laabs (1998) indicated that determining the status of the MGS is confounded by aspects of its 
biology.  The species is inactive throughout much of the year, and the period of surface activity 
varies from year to year.  Trapping success decreases dramatically when temperatures rise above 
approximately 98 °F (37 °C) (Aardahl and Roush 1985).  He cautioned that live-trapping studies 
must be scheduled carefully and cannot necessarily establish the absence of the species from a 
site.  
Current Habitat Characteristics Where MGS Has Been Previously Observed:  In 
1998, BLM provided 7.5’ USGS quad maps showing both specific locations (the 19 Aardahl and 
Roush sites) and general locations (most often within a 160-acre quarter section) for a total of 
102 MGS records, including those of Aardahl. For reasons discussed in the 1999 evaluation 
report (BLM 1999), these locations are likely more indicative of where the MGS has been 
observed rather than a good indicator of where the MGS actually resides.  For example, these 
records rarely indicated if the animal was an adult (and likely to be resident) or a juvenile (and 
potentially only dispersing through the area).   
Even so, both home range areas and dispersal areas are important to the species, and 
there have been few attempts to revisit historic locations to characterize the plant communities.  
Even in that, one must exercise caution.  Many of the data were collected in the 1970’s (and 
earlier), and there may have been natural or human-induced alterations in the plant communities, 
so that what we see now is not necessarily indicative of the plant community when the MGS was 
observed.  As already stated, it would appear that about 11% of the historic localities have been 
since converted to agricultural and urban uses.  In spite of these and other limitations, the 102 
transects were situated in what were considered the best available habitats as of 1993 (in terms of 
known occurrence and representative distribution throughout the range).  In fact, LaRue had nine 
confirmed MGS observations (auditory, visual, and a combination of the two) while walking 
transects in 1998. 
1998 Vegetation Surveys Within the Known Range:  In 1998, a total of 344 transects 
was surveyed by LaRue (237 transects), botanists Dave Fleitner (87), Dave Silverman (7), and 
R.T. Hawke (3), and by biologist Dave Roddy (10) (Map 3-19). Each transect consisted of a ¾-
mile, equilateral triangle, where all perennial plant species within one meter of the transect were 
counted. Transect locations included 102 places where the MGS was previously observed (i.e., 
CNDDB, Debi Clark records, and 19 of 22 sites surveyed by Aardahl and Roush (1985), and 208 
Appendices 
locations in “High” and “Medium” quality habitats.  The 208 transects were systematically 
(rather then randomly) located at about two-mile intervals within the 1993 polygons that CDFG 
and others identified as “High” and “Medium” quality habitats (although those designations have 
since been dismissed; see BLM 2000).  Thirty-four (34) transects were also surveyed in the Ord-
Rodman area, which is located east, south, and northeast of the known range. 
Surveys were performed on 17 days between May 1 and May 29, and on 11 days between 
June 8 and June 25 of 1998.  Data included observer name, date, beginning and ending times and 
temperatures, soil description, landform, plant community, perennial plant species on transect, 
numbers of winterfat and hopsage observed off the transect, annual plant species observed on 
and off the transect, special-status animal species, and occurrences of five human disturbances 
(OHV tracks, roads, shot gun/rifle shells, and “Other”).  Data were entered into an Excel spread 
sheet, and later geo-referenced using GIS, Arc Info software. 
Surveyors only recorded presence or absence of observable human disturbances; the 
abundance of a given disturbance was not recorded.  These data were limited to several 
“observable” human impacts that recently occurred, and may be affected by temporal factors. 
For example, roads and dumps may remain for more than a hundred years, but domestic dog sign 
and single-pass motorcycle tracks disappear in a matter of months or years.  The variability 
associated with multiple surveyors is somewhat minimized by the fact that LaRue surveyed 237 
(69%) of the 344 transects and Fleitner surveyed 87 (25%), so that 94% of the transects were 
surveyed by two of the five surveyors. 
Comparison of 1998 and 1985 Survey Results:  Table M-1 summarizes the findings of 
the 1998 vegetation surveys (LaRue, 1998 unpublished data) for 19 of the 22 sites trapped for 
MGS by Aardahl and Roush (1985).  The numbers of MGS trapped in 1985 are given in the 
second column, and listed in descending order of the number trapped.  The vegetation data in the 
remainder of the table were collected in 1998. 
Table M-1 
Comparisons Of Aardahl-Roush’s 1985 MGS Trapping Results  
With Data From The 1998 Plant Surveys 
SITE 
NO. 
MGS  
NO. 
PERENNIAL/ 
COMMUNITY 
NO. AND 
DOMINANT  
PERENNIAL 
NO. 
ANNUAL 
PLANTS 
WINTER- 
FAT 
Hop- 
SAGE 
ATRIPLEX
AR7 
Golden 
Valley 
68 
Creosote 
169 
Ambrosia dumosa 
12 
AR3 
CDFG 
Reserve 
34 
Saltbush 
269 
Atriplex spinifera 
33 
271 
AR13 
Steam Well 
32 
Creosote 
124 
Ambrosia dumosa 
20 
AR 6 
Fremont E 
25 
11 
Saltbush 
194 
Atriplex spinifera 
29 
15 
24 
AR 6 
Fremont W 
25 
10 
Saltbush 
294 
Atriplex spinifera 
28 
220 
AR 2 
22 
824 
25 
294 
Appendices 
Bowman S 
Creosote 
Ambrosia dumosa 
AR 2 
Bowman N 
19 
Creosote 
1056 
Ambrosia dumosa 
21 
AR 9 
Aqueduct S 
19 
11 
Creosote 
556 
Ambrosia dumosa 
16 
AR10 
Pilot Knob N 
19 
12 
Creosote 
225 
Ambrosia dumosa 
18 
AR 14 
Superior E 
18 
10 
Saltbush 
121 
Ambrosia dumosa 
26 
77 
12 
179 
AR 9 
Aqueduct N 
17 
11 
Creosote 
633 
Ericameria cooperi 
26 
AR 4 
DTNA 4 
15 
10 
Creosote 
99 
Ambrosia dumosa 
19 
AR11 
Rand W 
12 
Creosote 
83 
Ambrosia dumosa 
20 
AR11 
Rand E 
Creosote 
160 
Larrea tridentata 
21 
AR14 
Superior W 
12 
Saltbush 
235 
Ambrosia dumosa 
31 
36 
35 
135 
AR8 
Kramer Hills 
Creosote 
185 
Ambrosia dumosa 
19 
141 
AR1 
Bird Springs 
10 
Blackbush 
248 
Coleogyne 
ramosissima 
12 
111 
AR1 
Bird Springs 
12 
Blackbush 
656 
Hymenoclea salsola 
14 
72 
AR4 
DTNA 14 
Creosote 
94 
Ambrosia dumosa 
17 
3-12  
TOTALS 
350 
12 creosote 
5 saltbush 
2 blackbush 
12 Ambrosia 
dumosa 
3 Atriplex spinifera 
1 Larrea tridentata 
1 Ericameria 
cooperi 
1 C. ramosissima 
1 Hymenoclea 
salsola 
12-33 
22 
0-77 
0-111 
16 
0-294 
65 
Limitations of Existing MGS Records for Determining Current Status:  The WMP 
data base of year 2000 included 260 known records of the MGS throughout its known range.  
Except for the studies performed at Coso and several studies at Fort Irwin, no trapping efforts 
have persisted at a given site for more than a few seasons. Krzysik (1994) reports that a total 51 
different sites had been trapped for rodents on Fort Irwin: 38 sites were sampled in only a single 
year, 7 were sampled in 2 different years, 1 site for 3 years, 1 site for 4 years, 2 sites for 5 years, 
and 2 sites for 6 years.   
Although the available information provides a wealth of data points for MGS occurrence, 
itσ usefulness is significantly limited in several ways.  In the absence of trapping efforts over 
multiple, consecutive years, one cannot know if trapped squirrels were resident or dispersing 
through the area when they were caught. Additionally, adult animals are more likely to be 
Appendices 
resident than juveniles, but most of the records do not indicate the ages of captured squirrels. 
(Laabs 1998)  
The absence of data points does not indicate absence of the MGS, but likely indicates that 
focused studies were not performed in those areas.  For example, many MGS records are 
associated with roadways, where MGS may be occasionally observed from a vehicle, found 
crushed, or observed during surveys of proposed utility right of ways adjacent and parallel to the 
road.  Many MGS records are clustered in areas where extensive surveys have been performed, 
leaving a false impression of relative abundance.  Such focused trapping efforts have occurred at 
Edwards AFB (Laabs et al. 1994), the Indian Wells Valley (Rempel and Clark 1990), the Coso 
region (Leitner’s study sites), and on the Coolgardie Mesa, where Tom and Debi Clark made 
many observations.  
Brooks and Matchett (2001) reported that the MGS had been detected at 264 sites 
between 1886 and 2000.  Maps showing the distribution of these historic records collected over a 
114 year period do not represent the current status of the MGS.  However, they are useful in 
depicting the historically occupied range.  These data allowed us, for example, to determine how 
much of the known range is now occupied by urban and agricultural development. 
Plant Community Surveys:  In 1992, biologists Debi Clark and Tom Clark, and botanist 
Denise LaBerteaux, mapped vegetation communities over approximately 90% of the WMPA. 
Following an unspecified amount of field reconnaissance, they plotted vegetation communities 
on 7.5’ and 15’ USGS quad maps, then further refined community boundaries using 1:24,000 
aerial photography, dated 1989 (Source memorandum from Debi Clark to Larry Foreman, dated 
15 May 1996).  These data were later digitized and provided as a GIS (Arc Info) coverage.   
They mapped 42 different plant communities as occurring in the WMPA.   
M.2  PREVALENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THREATS 
Human Disturbances Observed During 1998 Vegetation Studies:  During the 1998 
Survey, biologists collected information on human disturbances observed along each transect, 
including those located near previous MGS reports (102 transects) and those located in high and 
medium quality habitats (208 transects).  Table M-2 displays the prevalence of disturbance types 
found along these transects
6
.  
Table M-2 
6 "OHV” refers to cross-country vehicle tracks, which were created by trucks, motorcycles, and all-terrain 
vehicles.  “Road” includes trails, and usually included routes passable by trucks.  Sheep, cow, and dog sign was 
usually feces.  “Guns” does not differentiate between legal activities (e.g., hunting, regulated target practice, etc.) 
and illegal ones (e.g., shooting glass and articles at dump sites).  “Dumps” generally required a vehicle to off-load 
the materials, so does not include litter.  “Mines” may have included pits and adits, exploratory excavations, borrow 
pits, etc.  “Ord.” refers to military ordnance, which typically included spent cartridges and clips from aircraft.  Two 
transects occurred in areas previously burned. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested