Appendices 
Prevalence of 10 Types of Disturbances 
Observed within the Known Range of the MGS 
During the 1998 Survey 
TRANSECTS 
DISTURBANCE TYPES 
Disturbances 
Total 
None  Yes 
OHV  Road  Shee
Gun  Dump  Cow  Dog  Mine  Ord.  Burn 
Total 
310 
168 
142 
145 
116 
56 
23 
20 
20 
12 
403 
% of 310 transects 
47% 
37 
18 
<1 
<1 
% of 403 disturbances 
36% 
29 
14 
<1 
<1 
Surveyors found one or more disturbance categories on 142 (46%) transects, and none of the 
disturbances on 168 (54%) transects.  The three most prevalent disturbances were cross-country 
travel on 145 (47%) of the 310 transects, roads on 116 (37%) transects, and sheep sign on 56 
(18%) transects.  
Agricultural Development:  By the early 1990’s, about 39,000 acres (61 square miles) 
of MGS habitat had been lost to agricultural development (Gustafson 1993).  About 4% of 
historic MGS occurrences are found in agricultural areas (LaRue, 1998 unpublished data).  
Grazing:  Grazing occurs on both public lands managed by the BLM and private lands, 
but mostly on BLM managed allotments.  There is little information available to show variable 
use areas.  Sheep are grazed inside and outside BLM allotments.  Cattle may wander up to 
several miles beyond designated allotment boundaries.  Not all land within allotments is suitable 
or occupied MGS habitats.  Mountainous areas, playas, and other unsuitable substrates may exist 
(Aardahl and Roush 1985 reported the MGS was somewhat less prevalent on desert pavement).  
Resident animals prefer substrates associated with lower bajadas and valley floors.  Juveniles, 
however, may disperse through rockier habitats.  As such, we have not dismissed the potential 
importance of mountainous areas for MGS dispersal. 
On private lands, woolgrowers, or landowners giving them permission, are required to 
obtain federal Section 10(a) permits if their activities are likely to result in the take of tortoises.  
To date, there have been no such permits issued for sheep grazing. There is no discretionary 
action required by county or city jurisdictions for grazing on private lands, so consequently there 
is no clear means of regulating this impact on private lands outside sheep allotments.   
When combining the acreage of BLM lands within sheep allotments (897,820 acres) with 
the acreage of private land given above (619,442 acres), we find that there are a total of 
1,517,262 acres (2,370 square miles) of BLM sheep allotments within the known range that are 
actively being grazed.  
There are no region-wide data to show the incidence of sheep grazing that is not 
associated with BLM allotments.  However, because there exists the potential to graze in these 
areas, the total sheep grazing area given above likely underestimates actual sheep grazing within 
the known range.  
Pdf searchable text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
find and replace text in pdf; how to select text in pdf and copy
Pdf searchable text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to make pdf text searchable; pdf editor with search and replace text
Appendices 
Hybridization Between Round-tailed Ground Squirrels and the MGS:  As shown in 
Map 3-17, the contact line between ranges of the MGS and round-tailed ground squirrel runs 
between Fort Irwin and Victorville along the Mojave River. Thus far, the only occurrences of 
hybrid (Wessman 1977) and suspected hybrid (Krzysik 1994; LaRue, 1997 pers. obs.) ground 
squirrels have been in the areas of Fort Irwin and Helendale. Gustafson (1993) reported that 
hybridization likely occurred in these areas due to ecological and behavioral changes in one or 
the other species that resulted from agricultural disturbances in the Helendale area and military 
maneuvers at Fort Irwin. 
Dr. Recht (2001 pers. comm.) has recently trapped the round-tailed ground squirrel in the 
Superior Valley, 10 or more miles inside the known range of the MGS.  This suggests that there 
is potential for hybridization to occur well into the known range, and not just along the edges. 
No information was found on the dispersal abilities of round-tailed ground squirrels.  If it 
is similar to that of the MGS, juvenile round-tails could to travel from one to several miles into 
the MGS range, assuming substrate conditions and other factors are favorable.   
Military Maneuvers:  The prevalence of MGS on a given installation is dependent on 
the occurrence of installations within the known range, naturally unsuitable habitats, types of 
military maneuvers, impacts associated with support facilities (e.g., cantonment areas, logistical 
areas), and other factors. 
Extensive areas on south-central and southwestern Edwards AFB are comprised of small, 
clay-pan playas may constitute suitable habitats, but extensive trapping surveys conducted in 
1994 failed to trap any animals throughout the large region (Laabs et al. 1994).  Unlike Edwards, 
both China Lake and Fort Irwin have extensive mountainous areas (greater than 20% slope) that 
are not likely suitable for resident MGS, although there is some potential for dispersing juveniles 
to use the lower slopes of such areas.   
Military maneuvers and their observable impacts vary dramatically between Fort Irwin 
(severe impacts) and either Edwards or China Lake (localized impacts).  Edwards has 
cantonment areas west of Rogers Dry Lake, and logistical support facilities occur west of Rogers 
and east of the northern end (Leuhman Ridge facilities) that have been resulted in MGS habitat 
loss.  China Lake has no cantonment area (Ridgecrest serves that function), and support facilities 
have resulted in minimal impacts to either the northern or southern ranges.  Given that both 
installations practice air-to-ground maneuvers, with limited day-to-day ground disturbance, most 
of the habitats are still intact and potentially occupied. 
Fort Irwin entertains 10 training rotations each year, where numerous mechanized 
vehicles and ground troops create new ground disturbances during each exercise (albeit in 
previously degraded areas).  At Fort Irwin, Gustafson (1993) reported that military training had 
affected approximately 130,000 acres (203 square miles) in the known range.  Most of the 
impacts are limited to areas below about 20% slope (LaRue and Boarman, in prep.), which 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
find text in pdf image; convert pdf to word searchable text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; search pdf files for text
Appendices 
coincides with the substrates most preferred by the MGS, where about 90% of 102 MGS records 
have occurred (LaRue, 1998 unpublished data). Krzysik (1991) noted heavy shrub losses from 
the main maneuver corridors at Fort Irwin.  Many of the impacts identified for cross-country 
OHV use also pertain to impacts at Fort Irwin, except that impacts at Fort Irwin are far more 
intense. 
Off-Highway Vehicles:  Off highway vehicle impacts are concentrated in (a) BLM-
designated vehicle open areas, (b) lands adjacent to open areas, and (c) heavy use areas that are 
not necessarily associated with either of the first two.   
There is anecdotal evidence that the MGS may be killed on both paved and dirt roads, 
although it has been suggested that they are too quick for this to happen.  For example, during 
tortoise surveys conducted near Water Valley, northwest of Barstow, in 1998, LaRue crushed a 
juvenile male MGS on a dirt road as it attempted to cross in front of his truck.  In 1997, LaRue 
observed a juvenile male (likely a hybrid) as it was crushed on National Trails Highway, several 
miles north of Helendale. One of the nine MGS observed in 1998 (LaRue, unpublished data) 
darted into burrows that were located in the berms of a dirt road.  The juvenile female was 
observed for about 20 minutes eating cryptantha alongside the road, and later using two different 
burrows located in berms on opposite sides of the road.  Recht (1977) also observed MGS 
feeding on Russian thistle that was congregated along shoulders of roads in northeastern Los 
Angeles County. 
Goodlett and Goodlett (1993) have shown, in the Rand Mountains, that the heaviest 
vehicle impacts occur immediately adjacent to both open and closed routes.  It is plausible, then, 
that individual MGS using resources adjacent to roads are more likely to be in harm’s way than 
those animals occurring in roadless areas.  It is also plausible that juvenile MGS, which are most 
likely to travel longer distances than adults, are somewhat more susceptible to vehicle impacts 
than adults.  Although adults may still be susceptible to vehicle impacts within their somewhat-
fixed home ranges, dispersing juveniles are likely to encounter more roads than an adult living 
within a fixed region.   
The potential to crush squirrels likely increases as the prevalence and use of roads 
increases in a given region.  Given the relatively higher incidence of cross-country travel in open 
areas (1998-2001 WMP data), vehicle impacts are more likely to occur in open areas and other 
places with similar densities of cross-country tracks, depending on resident and dispersing 
populations of the MGS.  Gustafson (1993) reported that four BLM open areas “…occupy over 
103,000 acres [161 square miles] within the range of the squirrel, although not all of the habitat 
in that acreage has been destroyed.”  
Data collected within the known range during tortoise surveys (1998, 1999, and 2001) 
show that vehicle impacts are heaviest inside and adjacent to designated open areas.  This is not 
surprising, in that these areas are designated for vehicle recreation both on and off roads.   
Two of the 23 sites trapped for the MGS in 2002 included the El Mirage and Spangler 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
keeping original layout. VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
how to select text in a pdf; pdf find highlighted text
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
for VB.NET provides users fast and accurate image recognition function, which converts scanned images into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD
how to select text on pdf; search pdf for text in multiple files
Appendices 
Hills open areas (Leitner, pers. comm. 2002).  However, the absence of squirrels cannot be 
attributed to vehicle use in those two areas.  El Mirage is located south of Highway 58, where no 
MGS were captured on eight of the nine trapping grids, including the one in the open area.  Nor 
were any of the high concentrations of winterfat and hopsage identified in 1998 (LaRue, 
unpublished data) associated with either open area.   
Data show that there is a “spill-over” effect from the open areas, where relatively higher 
incidences of vehicle impacts were found in adjacent areas, compared to non-adjacent lands. The 
prevalence of cross-country vehicle tracks north of El Mirage Open Area will probably be 
reduced due to boundary fencing installed in the late 1990’s. Other areas, adjacent to Jawbone 
and Spangler Hills, remain susceptible to open area-related impacts as no fences have been 
installed.  
Vehicle-based impacts may be prevalent in areas that are not adjacent to open areas.  
Within the MGS conservation area, these areas include lands within the Rand Mountains, west of 
Silver Lakes, within Kramer Hills, north of Hinkley, and southwest of Fort Irwin.  Smaller areas 
also exist east and northeast of Fremont Peak, Fremont Valley, Iron Mountains north of Silver 
Lakes, Superior Valley (one 4-mile region), and southeast of Harper Lake.  
Urban Development:  The MGS has been reported near urban and in rural sites outside 
the MGS conservation area south of Highway 138, near Pinyon Hills, and a second occurred 
near an aerospace industrial complex located adjacent to Palmdale (Becky Jones, pers. comm. 
2002). In the first case, the site and adjacent lands are comprised of extensive tracts of 
undeveloped lands and those with relatively light rural development.  At the second site, there 
are about five to six contiguous square miles of relatively undeveloped land, but the entire area is 
surrounded by urban and agricultural development.   
The MGS has also been observed in residential backyards in Inyokern (Peter Woodman, 
2000 pers. com.), and may be seen foraging on the golf course at China Lake (Tom Campbell, 
pers. comm.). In 1991, Laabs (Tierra Madre Consultants, Inc. 1991) tentatively identified an 
MGS burrow in the edge of an agricultural field in northeastern Lancaster. One squirrel was 
recently trapped at the proposed Hundai facility south of California City, where the consultant 
had identified habitats as being marginal (Michael Connor, pers. comm. 2002). In these latter 
cases, the sightings are adjacent to extensive areas of undeveloped lands. 
Given these observations, the only certain areas of MGS extirpation within the range are 
those that have been physically developed.  Such areas include, but are not limited to, paved 
roads and parking lots; residential, commercial, and industrial sites occupied by buildings, 
graded areas, and other areas where vegetation has been mechanically removed; solar facilities at 
Kramer Junction and Harper Lake; and large mined areas (U.S. Borax, Rand Mining Company, 
portions of the Shadow Mountains located east of Edwards AFB).  Degraded habitats typify 
lands adjacent to cities and unincorporated communities.  Site-specific data exist in consultant 
reports, which for the most part are inaccessible.   
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications. C#.NET PDF Document Drawing Application.
pdf text search; pdf find text
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
pdf search and replace text; how to search text in pdf document
Appendices 
M.3  CURRENT MGS MANAGEMENT AREAS 
Table M-3 identifies those managements areas that have been designated by the BLM’s 
CDCA Plan that provide some form of management protection for the Mohave ground squirrel. 
Table M-3 
MGS Management Areas Identified In The BLM’s CDCA Plan 
MANAGEMENT AREA 
DESCRIPTIONS 
SIERRA 
MOJAVE 
TECHACHAPI 
ECOTONE 
ROSE 
VALLEY 
DESERT 
TORTOISE 
NATURAL 
AREA 
WESTERN 
MOJAVE 
CRUCIAL 
HABITAT 
SUPERIOR 
VALLEY 
Acreage 
162,000 
18,000 
26,000 
512,000 
55,000 
Species Status Information 
Target Species 
MGS 
MGS 
Tortoise 
MGS 
Tortoise 
MGS 
Tortoise 
MGS 
Special Wildlife Habitat 
Yes 
ND
7
ND 
Yes 
Yes 
Federally Listed Species
8
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
State Listed Species 
MGS 
MGS 
MGS 
MGS 
MGS 
BLM Sensitive Species 
No 
No 
Tortoise 
Tortoise 
ND 
Area of Critical 
Environmental Concern 
Yes
9
No 
Yes 
No 
No 
Special Area 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Habitat Management Plan 
2-5 years 
2-5 years 
Complete 
2-5 years 
5-7 years 
Other Designation 
Sikes Act Agreement 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
Specific Management Actions Requiring Immediate Implementation (1-3 years) 
Control Vehicle Access 
Yes 
No 
No 
Yes 
No 
Establish a Cooperative 
Agreement 
Yes 
No 
No 
Yes 
No 
Increase Surveillance 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
Yes 
No 
Restrict Camping and/or 
Parking 
Yes 
No 
No 
Yes 
No 
General Long Term Goals 
Land Acquisition 
No 
No 
Yes 
Yes 
No 
Change Livestock Grazing 
Practices 
Yes 
No 
No 
Yes 
No 
7
ND = Not designated by the CDCA Plan for the expressed purpose of managing for MGS. 
8
In 1980 the tortoise was not federally listed, but rather designated as a BLM Sensitive Species.  
9
Jawbone-Butterbredt ACEC 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi empowered to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
text searchable pdf file; searching pdf files for text
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
how to select all text in pdf; search text in multiple pdf
Appendices 
MANAGEMENT AREA 
DESCRIPTIONS 
SIERRA 
MOJAVE 
TECHACHAPI 
ECOTONE 
ROSE 
VALLEY 
DESERT 
TORTOISE 
NATURAL 
AREA 
WESTERN 
MOJAVE 
CRUCIAL 
HABITAT 
SUPERIOR 
VALLEY 
Protect, Stabilize, Enhance 
Values 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes 
Table M-4 list the acreage of 18 wilderness areas for those portions that are inside and 
outside the MGS range.  Those areas with a single asterisk are partially within the range; 
Malpais Mesa is outside the planning area, but partially within the range. 
Table M-4 
Locations and Acreage of 18 Wilderness Areas  
Relative to the Range of the Mohave Ground Squirrel 
WILDERNESS AREAS (MI
2
TOTAL 
INSIDE RANGE 
OUTSIDE RANGE 
INSIDE THE RANGE 
Black Mountain 
33 mi
2
33 mi
2
All inside 
Coso Range 
82 
82 
All inside 
Darwin Falls 
13 
13 
All inside 
El Paso Mountains 
38 
38 
All inside 
Golden Valley 
57 
57 
All inside 
Grass Valley 
51 
51 
All inside 
Argus Range 
100 
20 
80 
Kiavah 
134 
45 
89 
Malpais Mesa 
50 
18 
32 
Owens Peak 
116 
43 
73 
Sacatar Trail 
78 
30 
48 
Totals 
752 mi
2
430 mi
2
Inside 
322 mi
Outside 
OUTSIDE THE RANGE 
Bighorn Mountain 
42 mi
2
All outside 
Bright Star 
13 
All outside 
Cleghorn Lakes 
62 
All outside 
Newberry Mountains 
43 
All outside 
Rodman Mountains 
54 
All outside 
San Gorgonio 
85 
All outside 
Sheephole Valley 
53 
All outside 
Total Outside 
352 mi
2
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Free .NET library for
convert pdf to searchable text online; pdf searchable text converter
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
find and replace text in pdf file; how to make a pdf document text searchable
Appendices 
APPENDIX O 
LIVESTOCK GRAZING
Appendices 
Appendices 
APPENDIX O 
LIVESTOCK GRAZING  
O.1   SHEEP GRAZING PERMITS AND LEASES 
Antelope Valley:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 7,871 acres comprised of 
510 acres of private land and 7,361 acres of public lands.  The allotment has 1,048 acres of non-
critical desert tortoise habitat.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing 
is authorized.  Ephemeral forage is found on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary locations 
and can be moved as sheep are herded through the allotment. 
Bissell:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 48,889 acres comprised of 43,293 
acres of private land and 5,596 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 5,596 acres of non-
critical desert tortoise habitat.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing 
is authorized.  Ephemeral forage is found on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary locations 
and can be moved as sheep are herded through the allotment. 
Boron:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 82,892 acres comprised of 72,024 
acres of private land and 10,868 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 10, 868 acres of non-
critical desert tortoise habitat.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing 
is authorized.  Ephemeral forage is found on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary locations 
and can be moved as sheep are herded through the allotment.   
Buckhorn Canyon:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 27,053 acres 
comprised of 14,689 acres of private land, and 12,364 acres of public land.  Most of this 
allotment is within designated critical habitat for the desert tortoise, and has not been grazed by 
sheep since 1987.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing is authorized 
in non-critical habitat, however due to the lack of contiguous public land outside of critical 
habitat it is unlikely that future sheep grazing would occur. 
Cantil Common:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 555,421 acres comprised 
of 236,472 acres of private land and 318,949 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 240,913 
acres of non-critical desert tortoise habitat, and 78,035 acres of desert tortoise critical habitat.  In 
years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing is authorized in non-critical 
habitat. Ephemeral forage is found on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary locations and can 
be moved as sheep are herded through the allotment. 
Goldstone:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 11,061 acres of public lands.  
This allotment has 11,061 acres of critical desert tortoise habitat. This allotment is currently an 
inactive, vacant ephemeral sheep allotment and has not been grazed by sheep since 1987. The 
1991 Biological Opinion and extensions disallowed ephemeral sheep grazing in critical desert 
tortoise habitat.  The entire allotment is on lands transferred by Congress to the Department of 
the Army in December 2001 (within the Fort Irwin expansion area). 
Appendices 
Gravel Hills:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 230,165 acres comprised of 
94,621 acres of private land and 135,544 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 0 acres of 
non-critical desert tortoise habitat and 135,544 acres of critical desert tortoise habitat. This 
allotment is currently inactive and has not been grazed by sheep since 1988. The 1991 biological 
opinion and extensions disallowed ephemeral sheep grazing in critical desert tortoise habitat. 
Hansen Common:  The CDCA Plan authorizes both cattle grazing and sheep grazing 
and/or trailing on the stock driveway.  In areas of the allotment where ephemeral sheep grazing 
is authorized, ephemeral cattle grazing is not authorized.  Sheep grazing occurs on this allotment 
during ephemeral years only. (See also discussion below for cattle allotments.)   
Johnson Valley:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 118,320 acres comprised 
of 9,134 acres of private land and 109,186 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 118,320 
acres of non-critical desert tortoise habitat and 0 acres of critical desert tortoise habitat.  In years 
of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing is authorized.  Ephemeral forage is 
found on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary locations and can be moved as sheep are 
herded through the allotment.  This allotment is currently inactive, vacant, and has not been 
grazed by sheep since 1992.  
Lava Mountains:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 20,902 acres of public 
lands.  This allotment has 18,757 acres of non-critical and 2,145 acres of critical desert tortoise 
habitat.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing is authorized in both 
non-critical and a small portion of critical habitat.  Ephemeral forage is found on large flats.  
Water is hauled to temporary locations and can be moved as sheep are herded through the 
allotment. 
Monolith Cantil:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 47,553 acres comprised 
of 9,782 acres of private land and 37,771 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 7,939 acres of 
non-critical and 29,846 acres of critical desert tortoise habitat.  In years of adequate ephemeral 
forage production, sheep grazing is authorized in non-critical habitat.  Ephemeral forage is found 
on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary locations and can be moved as sheep are herded 
through the allotment. 
Rudnick Common:  The CDCA Plan authorizes both cattle grazing and sheep grazing 
and/or trailing on the stock driveway.  In areas of the allotment where ephemeral sheep grazing 
is authorized, ephemeral cattle grazing is not authorized.  Sheep grazing occurs on this allotment 
during ephemeral years only. (See discussion below regarding cattle allotments.)  
Shadow Mountain:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 121,677 acres 
comprised of 69,419 acres of private land and 52,258 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 
86,664 acres of non-critical desert tortoise habitat and 35,013 acres of critical desert tortoise 
habitat.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep grazing is authorized in non-
critical habitat.  Ephemeral forage is found on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary locations 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested