how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : How to select text in pdf image Library software class asp.net winforms wpf ajax Vol-2-Complete-Bookmarks32-part2018

Appendices 
and can be moved as sheep are herded through the allotment. 
Spangler Hills:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 69,141 acres comprised of 
11,446 acres of private land and 57,695 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 54,143 acres of 
non-critical desert tortoise habitat.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, sheep 
grazing is authorized.  Ephemeral forage is found on large flats.  Water is hauled to temporary 
locations and can be moved as sheep are herded through the allotment. 
Stoddard Mountain:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 312,045 acres 
comprised of 121,859 acres of private land and 190,186 acres of public lands divided into three 
use areas.  This allotment has 126,202 acres of non-critical desert tortoise habitat and 112,772 
acres of critical desert tortoise habitat.  The West Stoddard Use Area is entirely within critical 
habitat and sheep grazing is not authorized.  In years of adequate ephemeral forage production, 
sheep grazing is authorized in non-critical habitat located in the Middle and East Use Areas.  
Ephemeral forage is found on large flats and foothills.  Water is hauled to temporary locations 
and can be moved as sheep are herded through the allotment. 
Superior Valley:  This is an ephemeral allotment consisting of 236, 316 acres comprised 
of 67,116 acres of private land and 169,200 acres of public lands.  This allotment has 0 acres of 
non-critical desert tortoise habitat and 169,200 acres of critical desert tortoise habitat. This 
allotment is currently an inactive and has not been grazed by sheep since 1988. The 1991 
biological opinion and extensions disallowed ephemeral sheep grazing in critical desert tortoise 
habitat.  In December 2001, Congress transferred about one third of the allotment to the 
Department of the Army as part of the Fort Irwin expansion. 
Tunawee Common:  The CDCA Plan authorizes both cattle grazing and sheep grazing 
and/or trailing on the stock driveway.  In areas of the allotment where ephemeral sheep grazing 
is authorized, ephemeral cattle grazing is not authorized.  Sheep grazing occurs on this allotment 
during ephemeral years only. (See discussion below regarding cattle grazing allotments.)   
Warren:  This is a perennial allotment consisting of 556 acres of public land.  The 
season of use is February 15 through May 31.  The grazing that occurs on this allotment consists 
mostly of drift from the surrounding private land around the allotment. 
How to select text in pdf image - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
select text pdf file; how to select text in pdf
How to select text in pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf text searchable; pdf make text searchable
Appendices 
O.2  CATTLE GRAZING PERMITS AND LEASES 
Cady Mountain:  The Cady Mountain Allotment is located between I-15 and I-40 in the 
western Mojave Desert and the allotment comprises 231,897 acres.  The period for grazing is 
yearlong.  The Mojave River runs through the extreme northern portion of the allotment and 
contains extensive areas of riparian habitat.  The majority of grazing use occurs in the western 
and central portions of the allotment in association with the active wells, and in the Afton 
Canyon area.  The allotment is within 160,104 acres of desert tortoise non-critical habitat.  An 
AMP was approved for this allotment in 1983, and a Rangeland Health Assessment was 
completed in 2000. 
Cronese Lake:  The Cronese Lake Allotment is located approximately 30 miles 
northeast of Barstow and just north of I-15.  The season of use is yearlong.  Water is supplied by 
one well on public land.  Approximately 55 percent of the allotment is within critical habitat for 
the desert tortoise.  This allotment has an AMP approved in 1983.  A Rangeland Health 
Assessment was completed for this allotment in 2000. 
Darwin: The Darwin allotment is entirely located inside the Lacey-Cactus-McCloud 
Allotment.  It is classified as a horse allotment.  The allotment has been vacant since 1993, and it 
is unlikely that it will be grazed again. 
Double Mountain: This allotment has not been grazed since 1990, and has been vacant 
since 1992.  It is unlikely that this allotment will be grazed again.  It is bordered on all sides by 
private land. 
Hansen Common:  The Hansen Common Allotment consists of 72,102 acres comprised 
of 37,254 private land and 34,848 acres of BLM lands.  Approximately 3,549 acres of the 
allotment is non-critical habitat for desert tortoise. This allotment does not have a grazing system 
based on pasture rotation. Most grazing occurs on private land with cattle drifting onto BLM 
land at various periods, depending on available forage and water. Cattle use is authorized on 
BLM land for 10 months.  Ephemeral forage on this allotment is located in areas typically grazed 
by sheep rather than cattle when adequate ephemeral forage production occurs. 
Harper Lake:  The Harper Lake Allotment is located 15 miles northwest of Barstow.  
Cattle use occurs all yearlong.  Approximately 65 percent (21,194 acres) of this allotment is 
within desert tortoise critical habitat and in the northern pasture while the remaining 35 percent 
(5,120 acres) of desert tortoise non-critical habitat is located in the southern pasture.  In the past, 
there has been a lack of developed water and boundary fencing in the northern pasture resulting 
in cattle drift off the allotment.  The recent development of stock water on private land in the 
northern pasture has more evenly distributed grazing use.  Until development of water in the 
northern pasture, past grazing use has been confined to the southern pasture.  An AMP was 
approved for this allotment in 1984, and a Rangeland Health Assessment was completed in 1999. 
Lacey-Cactus-McCloud: The Lacey-Cactus-McCloud allotment consists of 421,791 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. C# programming sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF. // Get page 3 from the document.
search multiple pdf files for text; select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
how to search pdf files for text; cannot select text in pdf file
Appendices 
acres, comprised of 2,375 acres of private land, 257,696 acres of Military land, and 7,644 acres 
of State land, and 158,532 acres of public land.  The Lacey-Cactus-McCloud allotment utilizes a 
rotational grazing system comprised of pastures that utilize fences and topographic barriers as 
boundaries.  Several of the pastures located on the China Lake NAWS have been closed to 
grazing for many years.  In addition, China Lake NAWS canceled grazing use on their portion of 
the allotment in June 2000.  There is approximately 18,025 acres of non-critical habitat for desert 
habitat.  
Oak Creek: The Oak Creek allotment has been vacant for more than ten years, and it is 
unlikely that it will be used again. 
Olancha Common:  The Olancha Common Allotment consists of 15,877 acres 
comprised of 1,410 acres of private land and 391 acres of State land, 18 acres of United States 
Forest Service (USFS) land and 13,900 acres of public land.  The allotment utilizes a two pasture 
rotational grazing system. 
Ord Mountain:  The Ord Mountain Allotment is located south of I-40, approximately 8 
miles southeast of Barstow.  The season of use is yearlong. The allotment is 154,848 acres in 
size of which 102,141 acres is in desert tortoise critical habitat and 34,047 acres is in desert 
tortoise non-critical habitat.  A small number of domestic horses are authorized to graze this 
allotment. Most of the grazing use on public land occurs in the western portion of the allotment 
where most of the developed water is located.  An AMP was approved for this allotment in 1985, 
and a Rangeland Health Assessment was completed in 1999. 
Pilot Knob: The Pilot Knob Allotment consists of 45,498 acres comprised of 1,720 acres 
of private land, 146 acres of State land, 4,727acres of military land, and 38,906 acres of public 
land.  The allotment has been in non-use since 1996.  It is unlikely that it will be grazed again. 
Rattlesnake Canyon:  The Rattlesnake Canyon Allotment is located at the base of and 
within the Bighorn Mountain Range. The season for cattle use is yearlong. The allotment is 
topographically divided into the desert pasture, Rattlesnake Canyon, and the mountain pasture.   
Pasture use is primarily seasonal, with most of the grazing use in the winter and spring occurs in 
the desert pasture while summer and fall grazing use occurs in the mountain pasture.  
Rattlesnake Canyon is primarily used to trail cattle between the desert and mountain pastures.  
The desert pasture has 12,800 acres of desert tortoise non-critical habitat, where desert tortoise 
densities are probably low.  Rattlesnake Canyon within the allotment is a wide, five-mile long 
canyon with steep walls and a rocky to sandy bottom.  The canyon stretches from the desert floor 
and rises in elevation to over 5,500 feet.  Several populations of Parish’s daisy have been 
identified within the allotment boundaries.  This allotment has no approved AMP.  A Rangeland 
Health Assessment was completed for this allotment in 1999.   
Round Mountain:  The Round Mountain Allotment is located on the north face of the 
San Bernardino Mountains, approximately 30 miles south of Barstow.  There are 15,565 acres of 
public land and 2,525 acres of private land within the allotment.  There are no known listed 
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. PDF Write. Text: Insert
how to make a pdf file text searchable; how to select text in pdf image
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. PDF Write. Header/Footer: Insert/Delete
how to select text in pdf reader; search a pdf file for text
Appendices 
species on this allotment. There has been no grazing on this allotment since 1998 due a wildfire 
in 1999.  The stocking rate for this allotment has averaged 100 head.  This allotment has no 
approved AMP, nor has a Rangeland Health Assessment been completed. 
Rudnick Common:  The Rudnick Common allotment consists of 236,184 acres, 
comprised of 86,030 acres of private land and 150,154 acres of public land.  There is 62,503 
acres of non-critical habitat for desert tortoise.  There are two lessees in the Rudnick Common 
Allotment.  One lessee grazes only in the Cane Canyon and Pinyon Well pastures.  These 
pastures have no desert tortoise habitat and the lessee is not affected by the proposed action or 
alternatives.  The second lessee grazes in the rest of the allotment, which has 62,503 acres of 
non-critical habitat for desert tortoise.  This allotment utilizes a rotational grazing system 
comprised of pastures that utilize fences and topographic barriers as boundaries.  Choice, timing, 
and duration of use for each pasture are dependent on several factors including plant phenology, 
climatic conditions, and past use.  
Tunawee Common:  The Tunawee Common allotment consists of 55,931 acres 
comprised of 4,202 private land and 51,729 acres of public land.  Approximately 1,800 acres of 
the allotment is non-critical habitat for desert tortoise.   Cattle have not grazed the allotment 
since 1993.  From 1994 to the present, sheep have grazed the allotment.  
Walker Pass:  The Walker Pass Common Allotment consists of 96,974 acres, comprised 
of 8,816 acres of private land and 88,158 acres of public land.  Approximately 32,058 acres of 
the allotment is non-critical habitat for desert tortoise.  Three lessees graze cattle on the Walker 
Pass Common Allotment.  The lessees can graze on the allotment for an eight-month period.  
The southern use area consists of 14,791 acres, comprised of 847 acres of private land and 
13,941 acres of BLM land.  There is 6,865 acres of non-critical habitat for desert tortoise. The 
lessee of the southern use area (lessee 1) uses water availability to promote proper distribution 
and movement of cattle in the use area.  Lessee 1 typically removes cattle from the allotment by 
February 28.  
The middle use area consists of 48,163 acres, comprised of 5,626 acres of private land, 
47 acres of state land, and 42,702 acres of public land.  There is 6,387 acres of non-critical 
habitat for desert tortoise.  The lessee of the middle use area (lessee 2) uses fences, and 
topographic features to distribute cattle in this use area.  Lessee 2 typically removes cattle from 
the allotment around June 30.  When ephemeral forage is sufficient the lessee typically make use 
of the eastern portion of the allotment where the ephemeral forage is most productive. 
The northern use area consists of 33,635 acres, comprised of 950 acres of private land, 
385 acres of state land, and 32,300 acres of public land.  There is 15,885 acres of non-critical 
habitat for desert tortoise.  The lessee of the northern use area (lessee 3) typically removes cattle 
from the allotment around June 30.  When ephemeral forage is sufficient the lessee typically 
make use of the eastern portion of the allotment where the ephemeral forage is most productive. 
Whitewater Canyon:  This allotment is discussed in detail in the Coachella Valley 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
pdf select text; make pdf text searchable
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
cannot select text in pdf; can't select text in pdf file
Appendices 
Habitat Conservation Plan. 
Table O-1 lists past livestock use for all the grazing allotments in the Planning Area: 
Table O-1 
Past Livestock Use 
GRAZING YEAR 
AUM’S 
CONSUMED 
GRAZING 
PERIOD 
AVERAGE NUMBER 
OF CATTLE & SHEEP 
BLM Barstow Field Office 
Buckhorn Canyon 
1980 
526 
3/01 to 6/30 
1,500 (S) 
1982 
218 
4/03 to 5/31 
700 
1983 
291 
3/23 to 5/31 
800 
1986 
472 
3/27 to 5/31 
1,400 
1987 
257 
3/16 to 5/16 
800 
Goldstone 
1987 
250 
3/23 to 5/08 
815  
Gravel Hills 
1980 
1,632 
4/01 to 6/01 
8,000  
1981 
139 
4/11 to 5/31 
800 
1982 
1,855 
3/26 to 6/15 
8,800 
1983 
4,441 
3/15 to 6/15 
14,790 
1985 
975 
3/19 to 5/31 
3,040 
1986 
1,450 
3/15 to 5/15 
5,315 
1987 
3,297 
3/18 to 5/31 
9,610 
1988 
957 
3/09 to 5/31 
3,750 
Johnson Valley 
1992 
75 
4/27 to 5/15 
600 
Shadow Mountain 
1992 
234 
3/28 to 5/09 
800 
1993 
379 
3/30 to 5/09 
1,600 
1995 
295 
3/23 to 4/25 
1,443 
1998 
958 
3/09 to 6/11 
2,100 
Stoddard Mountain 
1988 
288 
3/13 to 5/06 
800 
1991 
2,575 
4/13 to 6/21 
7,935 
1992 
1,405 
3/25 to 6/15 
4,000 
1993 
1,392 
3/28 to 6/18 
3,200 
1995 
1,389 
3/21 to 6/17 
3,931 
1998 
1,976 
3/12 to 6/19 
3,100 
2001 
736 
3/27 to 5/09 
2,800 
Superior Valley 
1980 
2,264 
3/22 to 6/09 
6,095 
1982 
1,465 
3/13 to 6/01 
13,390 
1983 
1,855 
2/12 to 6/11 
12,625 
1985 
1,835 
3/17 to 6/01 
15,450 
1986 
1,699 
3/09 to 5/19 
6,225 
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported image formats: PNG Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
how to select all text in pdf file; text searchable pdf
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
search pdf documents for text; how to search a pdf document for text
Appendices 
GRAZING YEAR 
AUM’S 
CONSUMED 
GRAZING 
PERIOD 
AVERAGE NUMBER 
OF CATTLE & SHEEP 
1987 
2,887 
3/21 to 5/31 
7,725 
1988 
570 
3/15 to 5/31 
1,350 
Cady Mountain 
1993 
98 
3/01 to 2/28 
10 (C) 
1994 
300 
3/01 to 2/28 
25 
1995 
360 
3/01 to 2/29 
30 
1996 
393 
3/01 to 2/28 
33 
1997 
800 
3/01 to 2/28 
66 
1998 
1,372 
3/01 to 2/28 
114 
1999 
1,831 
3/01 to 2/28 
152 
2000 
1,274 
3/01 to 2/28 
106 
2001 
1,374 
3/01 to 2/28 
114 
Cronese Lake 
1995 
283 
3/01 to 2/29 
23 
1996 
365 
3/01 to 2/28 
30 
1997 
365 
3/01 to 2/28 
30 
1998 
365 
3/01 to 2/28 
30 
1999 
418 
3/01 to 2/28 
40 
2000 
419 
3/01 to 2/28 
40 
2001 
403 
3/01 to 2/28 
34 
Harper Lake 
1989 
69 
3/01 to 2/28 
50 
1990 
69 
3/01 to 2/28 
50 
1991 
224 
5/19 to 2/28 
25 
1992 
72 
3/01 to 5/31 
25 
1993 
170 
6/01 to 2/28 
20 
1994 
285 
3/01 to 2/28 
25 
1995 
242 
3/01 to 2/28 
21 
1996 
228 
3/01 to 11/30 
25 
1997 
456 
3/01 to 2/28 
40 
1998 
571 
3/01 to 2/28 
50 
1999 
571 
3/01 to 2/28 
50 
2000 
571 
3/01 to 2/28 
50 
2001 
571 
3/01 to 2/28 
50 
Ord Mountain 
1990 
2,883 
3/01 to 2/28 
308 
1991 
2,892 
3/01 to 2/28 
309 
1992 
3,285 
3/01 to 2/28 
345 
1993 
3,630 
3/01 to 2/28 
385 
1994 
3,047 
3/01 to 2/28 
279 
1995 
2,706 
3/01 to 2/28 
259 
1996 
2,889 
3/01 to 2/28 
280 
1997 
1,808 
3/01 to 2/28 
170 
1998 
1,875 
3/01 to 2/28 
182 
1999 
1,307 
3/01 to 2/28 
145 
2000 
2,854 
3/01 to 2/28 
232 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
search text in pdf image; find text in pdf files
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
select text in pdf file; search pdf for text
Appendices 
GRAZING YEAR 
AUM’S 
CONSUMED 
GRAZING 
PERIOD 
AVERAGE NUMBER 
OF CATTLE & SHEEP 
2001 
3,906 
3/01 to 2/28 
326 
Rattlesnake Canyon 
1990 
1,037 
3/01 to 2/28 
96 
1991 
1,037 
3/01 to 2/28 
96 
1992 
1,040 
3/01 to 2/29 
96 
1993 
432 
3/01 to 2/28 
40 
1994 
1,037 
3/01 to 2/28 
96 
1995 
1,037 
3/01 to 2/28 
96 
1996 
1,035 
3/01 to 2/28 
96 
1997 
1,044 
3/01 to 2/28 
87 
1998 
1,044 
3/01 to 2/28 
87 
1999 
1,044 
3/01 to 2/28 
87 
2000 
1,044 
3/01 to 2/28 
87 
2001 
536 
3/01 to 2/28 
46 
Round Mountain 
1992 
398 
12/01 to 3/31 
100 
1993 
398 
12/01 to 3/31 
100 
1994 
454 
12/01 to 4/17 
100 
1995 
398 
12/01 to 3/31 
100 
1996 
298 
12/01 to 3/31 
75 
1997 
605 
12/01 to 6/02 
100 
1998 
1,192 
12/01 to 7/15 
150 
Valley Well 
1990 
24 
3/01 t0 2/28 
1991 
24 
3/01 to 2/29 
1992 
24 
3/01 to 2/28 
1993 
24 
3/01 to 2/28 
1994 
24 
3/01 to 2/28 
1995 
24 
3/01 to 2/28 
1996 
24 
3/01 to 2/28 
1998 
12 
3/01 to 8/31 
2001 
3/25 to 6/28 
BLM Ridgecrest Field Office 
Antelope Valley 
1980 
278 
3/1 to 7/31 
4300 
1981 
278 
3/1 to 7/31 
4300 
1982 
519 
3/25 to 6/30 
3000 
1985 
74 
4/1 to 5/20 
820 
1991 
109 
9/11 to 9/21 
1500 
1992 
164 
4/20 to 9/1 
2400 
1998 
60 
4/15 to 4/26 
1400 
Bissell 
1983 
324 
3/20 to 5/20 
800 
1986 
165 
3/15 to 4/15 
800 
1988 
453 
3/7 to 5/31 
800 
1991 
118 
4/13 to 6/15 
800 
Appendices 
GRAZING YEAR 
AUM’S 
CONSUMED 
GRAZING 
PERIOD 
AVERAGE NUMBER 
OF CATTLE & SHEEP 
1992 
683 
3/30 to 6/1 
1650 
1993 
149 
3/25 to 6/3 
800 
1995 
452 
3/22 to 6/15 
800 
1996 
3/20 to 5/20 
800 
1998 
389 
3/18 to 5/30 
800 
2001 
479 
4/10 to 5/30 
1600 
Boron 
1988 
603 
3/19 to 5/1 
1550 
Cantil Common 
Not Available 
Darwin 
Not Available 
Double Mountain 
Not Available 
Hansen Common 
1980 
354 
3/1 to 2/28 
38 
1981 
354 
3/1 to 2/28 
38 
1982 
354 
3/1 to 2/28 
38 
1983 
45 
3/1 to 2/28 
35 
1984 
31 
3/1 to 2/28 
30 
1985 
65 
3/1 to 2/28 
68 
1991 
77 
6/5 to 12/15  
50 
1992 
127 
3/1 to 2/28 
40 
1994 
93 
4/5 to 10/25 
58 
1995 
100 
3/30 to 8/30 
79 
1996 
159 
3/2 to 1/15 
90 
1997 
180 
3/10 to 10/2 
106 
1998 
53 
12/1 to 2/28 
72 
1999 
195 
3/1 to 2/28 
92 
2000 
244 
3/1 to 9/30 
111 
2001 
195 
3/1 to 9/30 
111 
Lacey-Cactus-McCloud 
Lava Mountain 
Monolith-Cantil 
Oak Creek 
Olancha 
Pilot Knob 
Rudnick Common 
Spangler Hills 
Tunawee Common 
Walker Pass Common 
Warren 
Not Available 
O.3   EXISTING BIOLOGICAL OPINION MEASURES 
O.3.1 Measures for Cattle Grazing Activities in Desert Tortoise Habitat  
Appendices 
1. Utilization of key perennial forage species shall not be exceed 40 percent from February 15 to 
October 14.  No averaging of utilization data among perennial key forage species or key areas 
shall occur.  When utilization approaches authorized limits in any key area, steps shall be taken 
to redistribute or reduce cattle use for that key area.  Monitoring of perennial vegetation such as 
utilization and trend would occur with methods detailed and prescribed in BLM manuals, 
handbooks, and plans.  Grazing use shall be curtailed to protect perennial plants during severe or 
prolonged drought.  These steps may include removal of cattle or, where feasible, turning off 
water at troughs (especially when livestock are not present) to reduce adjacent grazing use. 
2.  Cattle shall be evenly dispersed throughout their area of use, and herding shall be limited to 
shipping and animal husbandry practices.  Grazing use shall be managed according to grazing 
regulations, allotment management plans, CDCA Plan, and current biological opinions.  Grazing 
use would be managed to improve trends for native perennial and annual plants where site 
potential permits.  Galleta grass shall be a key forage species wherever it is found.  Feeding of 
roughage, such as hay, hay cubes, or grains to supplement forage quantity, is prohibited. 
3. All cattle carcasses found within 300 feet of any road shall be removed and disposed of in an 
appropriate manner, and no prior notification to the BLM is necessary if off-road vehicle use is 
required, but permission from the authorized officer is required to remove animals within 
wilderness. The authorization to use temporary, non-renewable perennial forage above permitted 
use shall be for no longer than three-month increments in non-DWMA desert tortoise habitat. 
4. Authorization for ephemeral forage (annual grasses and forbs) in non-DWMA desert tortoise 
habitat shall occur when 230 pounds or more by air dry weight per acre of ephemeral forage is 
available.  Ephemeral production data shall be collected when necessary if requests are made for 
ephemeral grazing use.  Any cattle authorized to use ephemeral forage shall be removed 
whenever the thresholds
for curtailing ephemeral grazing is reached. The authorization to use 
temporary, non-renewable perennial forage above permitted grazing use shall be authorized for 
no longer than three-month increments in non-DWMA desert tortoise habitat. 
5.   All proposed range improvements would receive NEPA and FWS review as needed. For all 
construction, operation, and maintenance of range improvements involving land disturbance in 
desert tortoise habitat the following requirements apply: 
A.  Surface disturbance during construction of range improvements shall occur on previously 
disturbed sites and disturbing soil in habitat shall be minimized whenever possible.  
Routine vehicle use shall be limited to existing roads and disturbed areas, and off-road 
vehicle activity shall be held to a minimum.  Construction of new roads shall be 
minimized.  After completion of the project, the disturbed soil shall be blended and 
contoured into the surrounding soil surface.  To reduce attraction of desert tortoise 
predators, debris and trash created during construction or maintenance of a facility will 
be removed immediately. 
B.  Range improvement construction, operation, and maintenance shall be modified as 
Appendices 
necessary to avoid direct impacts to desert tortoises and their burrows e.g., construction 
of fences or pipelines near tortoise burrows shall be avoided.  All proposed range 
improvement projects shall be designed and flagged to avoid impacts to tortoises and 
their burrows.  Pre-construction desert tortoise surveys of project sites shall be conducted 
by a qualified biologist.  Existing access and areas of disturbance shall be utilized when 
trenching a section of new pipe or during performance of maintenance.  Any hazards to 
desert tortoises that may be created, such as auger holes and trenches, shall be monitored 
by biological monitor at least twice daily for desert tortoises that become trapped.  These 
hazards will be eliminated before workers leave the site. 
C.  Prior to land-disturbing activities, a field contact representative (FCR) will be designated 
to ensure compliance with protective measures stipulations for the desert tortoise and will 
be responsible for coordinating with the Service.  A FCR will have the authority and 
responsibility to halt activities in violation of the Service stipulations. 
D.  Only authorized personnel are permitted to handle desert tortoises.  If construction or 
maintenance of a range improvement endangers the life of a desert tortoise then 
authorized persons may move the animal a short distance away or hold the animal 
overnight to release it in the same area the next day. 
E.  All construction and maintenance workers shall strictly limit their activities and vehicles 
to areas flagged or cleared by persons authorized by the Service.  When off-road use with 
equipment is required, the lessee is to notify the BLM two working days prior to 
construction or maintenance of a facility. 
O.3.2 Measures for Sheep Grazing Activities in Desert Tortoise Habitat  
1. Turnout of sheep shall not occur until production of 230 pounds air dry weight (ADW) per 
acre of ephemeral forage is available.  The lessee shall remove sheep from an area of use or the 
entire allotment if ephemeral forage production falls below 230 pounds ADW per acre. 
2. Sites where sheep are bedded and watered shall be changed daily.  Bedding or watering sites 
are to be at least ¼ mile from any previous site.  Sheep are to be watered on or adjacent to 
existing dirt roads (within 25 feet) or existing disturbed or open areas cleared of shrubs from past 
uses. 
3. No grazing is authorized except as approved through grazing application.  All herders shall 
have a copy of the current use authorization in their possession and a copy posted at the herder’s 
camp site.  When sheep are trailed outside of the allotment, all herders are required to have a 
copy of the trailing authorization in their possession. 
4. When lambs are with ewes, a band of sheep is limited to no larger than 1,000 adult sheep with 
an approximately equal number of lambs. 
5. Sheep are to be widely scattered or in a loose pattern when grazing through an area, and 
grazing sheep are to graze/move through an area only once during the grazing season. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested