how to show pdf file in asp.net page c# : Text select tool pdf control Library system azure .net html console Vol-2-Complete-Bookmarks37-part2023

Appendices 
construction aggregates (sand and gravel) in the western portion of the subregion, with 
aggregates mined at the Bowman and Inyokern pits outside the western boundary.  There are no 
active mining operations in the subregion filed under the California Surface Mining and 
Reclamation Act of 1975 (SMARA), based on reports from the California Division of Mines and 
Geology.  Some interest has been expressed in the far western portion of the subregion as 
evidenced through mining claim locations.  BLM records show, as of March 2001, that there are 
six lode-mining claims and six placer mining claims in this portion of the subregion in the 
Rademacher Hills.  There is one plan of operation and one pending (April 2001) notice level 
operation in the Rademacher Hills area of the subregion filed pursuant to the regulations at 43 
CFR 3809.  There are no aggregate resources being developed within the subregion, and the 
subregion is not valuable, prospectively or otherwise, for Leasing Act minerals. 
A utility corridor crosses the northern portion of the subregion, in an east/west direction. 
This corridor contains existing facilities. 
The Ridgecrest Subregion supports a wide variety of recreation opportunities and 
experiences including, but not limited to, four wheel drive and motorcycle touring, hunting and 
target shooting, paintball, stargazing, photography, exploring mining sites, social gatherings, 
rockhounding, hiking and running, limited dispersed camping, mountain biking and equestrian 
recreation. 
The most prominent recreation feature in the subregion is the Rademacher Hills, located 
south of the City of Ridgecrest.  The Rademacher Hills offer a 12.5-mile network of trails open 
to hiking, jogging, horseback riding and mountain biking.  This area forms the backdrop for the 
City of Ridgecrest and provides an urban-public land interface that is fast becoming a popular 
recreation site for local residents.  Motorized trails through the Rademacher Hills provide access 
from the City of Ridgecrest to the 57,000 acre Spangler Hills OHV Area.  A link to the 
Statewide Motorized Discovery Trail is proposed to connect the trail to the City of Ridgecrest 
through the Rademacher Hills. 
The subregion is also used by a variety of recreation permit holders who use the public 
lands for mountain bike races, ultra-marathon running events, high school cross country running 
competitions, equestrian trail rides and endurance events, dual sport motorcycle tours, jeep tours, 
and other activities. 
The area is used for commercial 4-wheel drive and dual sport motorcycle tours and 
competitive equestrian endurance and mountain bike events.  
R.2.18 Sleeping Beauty Subregion 
General Description:  The Sleeping Beauty subregion, located approximately 3 miles 
west of Ludlow, California, is defined by Interstate-40 on the south by the northern edge of the 
public land Multiple Use Class L (limited) boundary on the north  
Text select tool pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select all text in pdf; select text pdf file
Text select tool pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
make pdf text searchable; select text in pdf
Appendices 
The northern half of the subregion includes Sleeping Beauty Mountain, a part of the 
southern Cady Mountains.  The southern half is a large, sweeping bajada sloping southward to 
Interstate 40.  The larger washes draining the southern Cady Mountains support disjunctr 
occurrences of white-margined beardtongue, a rare plant.  Elevations within the subregion range 
from 1,300 to 3,980 feet.  Access to this subregion is generally from Interstate 40, via Lavic off-
ramp. 
Recreation Activities/Resource Uses Overview:  Primary recreation activities and 
resource uses occurring in this subregion are cattle grazing, power line and pipeline rights-of-
way, wildlife habitat, hiking and camping, recreational prospecting and mining, vehicle touring, 
utility corridor maintenance, and mineral exploration.  
R.2.19 South Searles Subregion 
General Description:  The South Searles subregion, is located approximately 8 miles 
northeast of Ridgecrest, immediately north of Randsburg Wash Road and the Spangler Hills 
Open Area.  Randsburg Wash Road defines the subregion on the south, the China Lake Naval 
Air Weapons Station (NAWS) boundaries on both its east and west sides, and by the Inyo-Kern 
County line on the north.  Numerous landowners own the private lands.  The Trona Pinnacles 
National Natural Landmark and ACEC is surrounded by the subregion on all four sides.   
The general region consists of the lower part of Searles Valley surrounding Searles Lake 
It is encircled by two prominent mountain ranges, the Argus and Slates, on the west and east, and 
by the Spangler Hills on the south.  The area abuts the upper half of Searles Valley above Searles 
Lake to the north - an area covered by the North Searles Subregion. The area is made up almost 
entirely of gravel to sandy to silty lakebed sediments.  Elevations within this subregion are 
generally quite low, keeping to within 1600-2500 feet on the valley floor, to more than 2800 feet 
at selected high points in the Argus Range. Visitation is generally high, particularly in cooler, 
winter months, due to the presence of the Trona Pinnacles, and the subregion’s general location 
along a highway to Death Valley National Park (Highway 178) and close proximity to the 
communities of Trona and Ridgecrest.  Mojave saltbush and creosote bush scrub are the 
predominant plant communities on the valley floor, with rabbitbrush dominating plant 
communities in upper elevation washes.   
Access to this subregion is primarily from Highway 178 and its Trona-Wildrose  
extension.  The subregion can also be accessed from the Randsburg-Wash road, north of the 
Spangler Hills Open Area.   
Recreation Activities/Resource Uses Overview:  In general, the area absorbs a lot of 
casual OHV recreational use involving dune buggies, quads, and motorcycles.  Most of these 
users are local residents.  They come from Trona and the associated communities of West End, 
Argus, and Pioneer Point, or from Homewood Canyon.  Some gem and mineral collecting also 
occurs, primarily in the foothills of the Argus Range on the western edge of the subregion.  In 
October, the Searles Valley Gem and Mineral Society put on a Gem and Mineral Show.  The 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
search pdf documents for text; how to search pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
pdf text select tool; text searchable pdf file
Appendices 
subregion is also used for interpretative museum and commercial 4-wheel drive, dual sport 
motorcycle and equestrian tours. 
Vehicles are permitted to pull off within 300 feet of a route to make camp in the 
subregion, except in the vicinity of the Pinnacles where visitors are asked to camp only in 
already impacted sites.  Laws and regulations prohibit camping or staying within 200 yards of 
waters, which includes the natural seeps and springs in the Argus Range.  Currently, all access 
routes on public land in this subregion comply with applicable law.   
Most trails in the subregion are full-size 4x4 as opposed to quad or single-track routes, 
which exist only in the extreme southwestern corner of the subregion.  While some staging areas 
off of Highway 178 exist, most off-road vehicle enthusiasts probably stage from campsites 
within the Trona Pinnacles or from various campsites within the Spangler Open Area just outside 
the subregion.  Local people most likely enter this area directly from their homes in West End, 
South Trona, and Argus.  For access to good riding areas, they must cross highway 178, 
traveling approximately 7 miles south of town to reach the Pinnacles or more than 12 miles to 
reach the Spangler Open Area.   
The area offers very few opportunities for backcountry touring and sightseeing outside of 
the Trona Pinnacles National Natural Landmark.  Climbers have not been observed in great 
numbers within the subregion.  Equestrian use is tied to spring sources or in the case of 
organized, commercial and/or competitive events to regular vehicle routes for staging the 
necessary water and periodic veterinarian checks.  Most people who hike in the area are locals 
who are simply exploring their own backyards.   
Access to hunting areas is limited within the subregion.  Hunting thus requires a good 
deal of hiking in the subregion.  Hunters are known to pursue chukar over steep rocky terrain for 
long distances.  Chukar and California quail are the primary targets although jackrabbits and 
mourning dove are hunted as well.   
Non-motorized trails for mountain bikers do not exist in the area.  However, mountain 
biking is popular along Highway 178 and with campers at the Pinnacles.   
Rockhounding occurs throughout the area, in specific localities, mostly in the foothills of 
the Argus and Slate Ranges.  During October’s Gem and Mineral Show, the Searles Valley Gem 
and Mineral Society offers information about and several tours to various collecting and other 
sites of local interest in the valley.   
Target shooting occurs throughout the area and is generally permitted wherever the 
terrain offers a safe backstop.  However, the ACEC Plan for The Trona Pinnacles specifically 
prohibits target shooting anywhere within the vicinity of the National Landmark. 
R.2.20 Superior Subregion 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
to install and use the PDF page(s) extraction tool. can use it to extract all images from PDF document. Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by
how to select all text in pdf file; how to make a pdf file text searchable
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Windows systems and supports Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Text box.
how to select text in pdf image; how to make a pdf document text searchable
Appendices 
General Description:  The Superior subregion, located north of Barstow, is bounded by 
Fort Irwin (National Training Center) and China Lake Naval Weapons Center on the north, the 
Fremont subregion and Black Mountain Wilderness on the west, and private lands and 
Interstate-15 on the south.  The subregion is 271,528 acres in size, with 192,877 acres (72 
percent) of Federal land managed by the BLM, and approximately 77,359 acres (28 percent) 
either private or State owned land.  The major private landowner is the Catellus Development 
Corporation.   
The Superior subregion encompasses numerous features that include Mount General, the 
Waterman Hills, Mud Hills, Fossil Canyon, Owl Canyon, and the Inscription Canyon area, 
known for its great quantity of rock art.  The northern portion of the Superior subregion includes 
the Superior Valley, an area characterized by low-lying, flat open areas containing two dry lakes: 
an unnamed, small dry lake at the western edge and the larger Superior Dry Lake at the eastern 
boundary.  The central portion of the subregion includes the Black Mountain Lava Flows, Lane 
Mountain, and the Paradise Range.   
The Rainbow Basin, located in the south-central portion of the subregion, is an ACEC 
and is not included in the Superior subregion.  Access to areas within the Rainbow Basin (which 
include the Mud Hills, Fossil Canyon, Owl Canyon campground, and the Rainbow Basin 
National Natural Landmark) is obtained via the Superior subregion.  The southern portion of the 
subregion encompasses Mud-Water Valley, Waterman Hills, and outlying areas of Barstow. 
Elevations range from approximately 2000 feet in the southeast to 4,522 feet at the peak of Lane 
Mountain in the central-eastern portion of the subregion.   
Vegetation in the northern portion of the subregion is similar to other areas in the West 
Mojave.  In the Lane Mountain area, vegetation consists of creosote/mixed desert scrub 
association with scattered Joshua Trees and golden cholla.  The Paradise Range in the northeast 
include a series of volcanic, rocky hills that exhibit little vegetation on the slopes, with the 
exception of scattered creosote.  Vegetation is similarly sparse within the Black Mountain Lava 
Flows at the central portion of the subregion.  The vegetative cover in the southern portion of the 
subregion generally is sparse, and includes occasional Joshua Trees. 
The Superior subregion is criss-crossed by a number of roads, mainly unimproved.  
Access from population centers to the Superior Valley in the north is provided via Copper City 
Road, an improved road via Fort Irwin Road, and a paved highway.  Due to these access routes, 
the Superior Valley is easily reached, as demonstrated by the noticeable presence of recreational 
visitors in this portion of the subregion.  Access to the subregion from the south is obtained from 
Interstate 15, State Route 58, and Irwin Road. 
Recreation Activities/Resource Uses Overview:  Primary recreation activities and other 
resource uses occurring in the subregion are rockhounding, camping, picnicking, powerline and 
pipeline rights-of-way, mining and recreational mining, hunting, and off-highway vehicle use.   
Excellent opportunities for both hiking and backpacking exist in the Black Mountains, 
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
An advanced PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Windows systems and supports Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Text box.
cannot select text in pdf; pdf find text
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
Office PowerPoint (.ppt, .pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer particular text tool can select text on all
pdf find text; cannot select text in pdf
Appendices 
Opal Mountains, and Calico Mountains.  Major activities include camping, rockhounding, 
hunting, and motorcycle free play. The hard, smooth surfaces of two dry lakes in the Superior 
Valley provide excellent conditions for land sailing.  The OHV community also utilizes this 
portion of the subregion, although the flat terrain is less than ideal for their activities. 
The suggested vehicle route network provides the recreational OHV enthusiast an 
expansive variety of opportunities from which to choose.   Routes vary from long, flat graded 
utility corridor routes or the flats of Superior Valley; technical jeep routes in the Calico 
Mountains; technical single-track motorcycle routes in the Mud Hills; lengthy remote touring 
routes around the Black Mountain wilderness or through the Grass Valley wilderness corridor; 
short quickly accessible routes into the Mitchell Range or Waterman Hills; and those that 
provide a loop opportunity to those that are "dead-ends".   
Additionally, the suggested route network provides access to a variety of destinations 
ranging from historic mining sites (e.g. Calico Mountains), prehistoric cultural zones (e.g. 
Inscription Canyon), upland springs (e.g. Sweet Water Spring), geologically unusual areas (e.g. 
Rainbow Basin), rock-hounding areas (e.g. Opal Mountain), recreational mining (e.g. Coolgardie 
area); and mountain bike recreation throughout the subregion.   
R.3  ROUTE DESIGNATION MAPS 
Maps of the route network can be found on the attached compact disk (CD Rom).  Maps 
are full color, 1:24,000 scale USGS topographic quads; where applicable, the route number is 
attached for easy cross-referencing to the tables presented in Section R.5.  Maps can be viewed 
using the Adobe reader on your home or local library computer.  You will find that this will 
enable you to view any section of the route network at a variety of scales, and to print your own 
maps from the attached files.  Subregion and motorized access zone boundaries are indicated. 
There are two complete sets of maps on the CD Rom, each consisting of approximately 
90 quads.  One set is for the Proposed Action (Alternative A) and the other set is for the No 
Action alternative (Alternative G).  Each set presents a complete set of quads for all of the public 
lands within the western Mojave Desert.  Maps are numbered sequentially.  Thus, proposed 
action map 25 can be found in the file labeled “FEIS_pr_25.pdf”, while No Action Alternative 
map 44 can be found in the file labeled “6.30.03_44.pdf”. 
Please note that two index maps are provided.   Each index map presents a map of the 
western Mojave Desert, together with the location of each numerically labeled quad map.  The 
proposed action index map is labeled “FEIS_pr_index_map.pdf”, while the No Action 
Alternative index map is labeled “6.30.03_index_map.pdf”.  Also note that a composite map for 
the proposed Juniper subregion is provided, labeled “FEIS_pr_juniper.pdf”. 
R.4  DECISION TREE 
The route designation decision tree is presented on the next page, followed by tables 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Codes to Create Linear and 2D Barcodes on
supported by this VB.NET PPT barcode inserting tool? apply PPT slide getting method to select the target offers users the human readable text setting option
pdf find and replace text; pdf select text
TIFF to PDF Converter | Convert TIFF to PDF, Convert PDF to TIFF
to PDF Converter is a windows tool that converts TIFF-PDF Conversion; Able to preserve text and PDF Select "Convert to PDF"; Select "Start" to start conversion
search multiple pdf files for text; cannot select text in pdf file
Appendices 
showing changes from the draft West Mojave Plan and EIR/S. 
R.5  ROUTE DESIGNATION TABLES 
The tables presented on the following pages address each of the changes made in the 
route network from the draft West Mojave Plan and EIR/S.  The most extensive changes were 
made in the Juniper subregion.  The tables identify, for each route, the following: 
•  The route subregion, 
•  The route number, 
•  The original decision tree code (when the decision tree process was applied to a 
particular route, and the decision branch followed to its end, a distinctive code was 
assigned to that end point, allowing the documentation of the thought process that led to 
the final recommendation.) (some of these designations were changed in response to 
comments received on the draft West Mojave Plan and EIR/S), 
•  Whether the route is recommended as open or closed, and  
•  Reasons for the open or closed recommendation. 
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
NET developers to search text-based documents, like PDF, Microsoft Office The well built-in text search tool is compatible with most Text Select, Copy & Paste.
convert pdf to searchable text online; how to select text in pdf and copy
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET An advanced PDF converter tool, which supports to be are allowed to set scaling value and select compress mode
text select tool pdf; pdf text searchable
Appendices 
Route Designation Decision Tree 
Yes 
No 
2. Does the route impact sensitive species 
or occupied habitat of sensitive species? 
3.  .Does the route provide commercial, 
administrative or private land access?
?
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
4.  Is there an alternative route(s) that could 
serve the same purpose and reduce impacts to 
Open 
PO-1 
*1
Yes 
No 
Designate route as limited, develop 
a new route or portion thereof that 
-1
Open
PO-2
*1
5. Is route closure likely to 
lead to increased conservation 
6. Is route closure likely to lead 
to increased conservation of 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
9. Does this route 
contribute to recreational 
opportunities, dispersed 
use (i.e. thereby reducing 
impacts, e.g. soil erosion), 
connectivity, public safety, 
etc.? 
7. Does most of the route 
impact occupied habitat of 
sensitive species?   
8. Would this route closure mitigate other 
cumulative habitat impacts and/or help 
maintain more/larger contiguous blocks 
of habitat which might aid in the 
recovery of sensitive species?  
10. Would this route 
closure mitigate other 
cumulative habitat 
impacts and/or help 
maintain more/larger 
contiguous blocks of 
habitat which might aid 
in the recovery of 
sensitive species? 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
11. Are the 
commercial or 
private uses of this 
route adequately 
met by another 
route(s) that avoid 
or minimize the 
impact to occupied 
habitat of sensitive 
species?  
Open 
SO-1 
*1
12. Does this route 
contribute to 
recreational 
opportunities, 
dispersed use (i.e. 
thereby reducing 
impacts, e.g. soil 
erosion), 
connectivity, public 
safety, etc.?
?
Open
SO-2
*1
13. Is this 
contribution 
already provided 
for by other routes 
within the 
Motorized Access 
Zone? 
Closed 
SC-1 
*1
14. Does this route 
contribute to recreational 
opportunities, dispersed 
use (i.e. thereby reducing 
impacts, e.g. soil erosion), 
connectivity, public safety, 
etc.? 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
Close 
SC-2 
*1
Open 
SO-4 
*1
Close
SC-3 
*1
Close
SC-4 
*1
Close
SC-5 
*1
Open
SO-5
*1
15. Is this contribution 
already provided for by 
other routes within the 
Motorized Access Zone? 
16. Is this contribution already 
provided for by other routes 
within the Motorized Access 
Yes 
No 
Yes 
No 
Close 
SC-6 
*1
Open 
SO-6 
*1
Close 
SC-7 
*1
Open
SO-7
*1
Open
S0-3 
*1
1. Is the route a commercial right-of-way, officially recognized or maintained or serve as a regional route that serves more than on 
sub-region or represents a principal means of connectivity within a sub-region? 
Appendices 
West Mojave Route Designation Tree Footnotes 
1.  Question 2: Evaluate and take into account:  
•  both season and intensity of use as it relates to impacts to sensitive species or their 
habitat; 
•  the number of sensitive species and/or the amount of sensitive habitat potentially 
impacted; 
•  Other areas already designated or set aside or other measures that may be already 
contributing to the conservation of these species (e.g. Wilderness Areas and raptor nests, 
bat grates, etc.)  
2.  Question 3: E.g. utility, military, mining, ranching facilities; monitoring sites; guzzlers). 
3.  Questions 8, 10: I.e. Would this route closure likely lead to a reduction of those indirect 
impacts suspected of leading to a significant decline in habitat quality (e.g. litter, 
poaching, harassment, plinking, etc.) or lead to a decline in impacts that directly 
negatively impact sensitive species?  
4.  Questions 11, 13, 15, 16: When evaluating the duplicity of this route take into 
consideration the quality of this route, particularly as it relates to public safety.  
5.  *1:  
•  Are there any other special circumstances that would warrant reconsideration? 
(e.g. unusual public safety issues, Section 106 considerations, current or future 
community growth/zoning issues, current or reasonably foreseeable land 
acquisitions or trades (e.g. for mitigation as part of this planning effort or by other 
resource organizations/agencies), special permits (e.g. Mining Plan of 
Operations), environmental benefits of a route (e.g. facilitating the maintenance of 
a guzzler), legal easements, user conflicts, neighboring uses, etc.). 
•  Should a limited designation be used in lieu of either an open or closed 
designation in order to mitigate for impacts?    
Appendices 
Juniper Subregion Route Designation Table 
Route 
Number 
Designation 
Original 
Decision 
Tree 
Comments 
RJ1001 
PO2 
Japatul Rd from A.V. to Powerline 
RJ1002 
SO7 
Loop rt provides access to scenic views and hang gliding areas 
RJ1003 
SO7 
MC access to JF area from residential area 
RJ1004 
PO2 
Connection from 1001 to 1002 and quarry 
RJ1005 
SO5 
MC rt will replace the use that was formerly on 1057 through Cottonwood Sp. 
RJ1006 
SO3 
Access to overlook and camping 
RJ1007 
SO7 
Provides access to hang gliding areas 
RJ1008 
SO7 
Provides access to hang gliding areas 
RJ1009 
SO7 
Provides access to hang gliding areas 
RJ1010 
SO7 
Provides access to hang gliding areas 
RJ1011 
SO3 
Spur rt provides access to mining area and camping 
RJ1012 
SO7 
Spur rt provides access to Cottonwood Spr parking 
RJ1013 
SO7 
Short connector improves accessibility of rt system 
RJ1014 
SC5 
Parallel to 1002 
RJ1015 
SC5 
Connector rt duplicates access provided by 1002 and 1004 
RJ1016 
SC5 
Duplicate rt parallel to 1006 
RJ1017 
SC5 
Duplicate rt parallel to 1005 and offers similar rec opp 
RJ1018 
SC5 
Duplicate rt parallel to 1005 
RJ1019 
PO2 
Powerline rd from Bowen Ranch to west 
RJ1020 
SC1 
Parallel rt to 1019 and 2010 
RJ1021 
SC1 
MC rt parallels Bowen Ranch Rd and promotes trespass on private property 
RJ1022 
SC1 
Parallel MC provides no additional rec opp 
RJ1023 
SC1 
MC rt promotes trespass onto private property 
RJ1024 
SC5 
Unnecessary short rt connects parallel rts and crosses private land 
RJ1025 
SC5 
Unnecessary short rt connects parallel open rts 
RJ1026 
SC1 
Rt proliferation behind fence in unstable soils.  Provides no access or 
connectivity 
RJ1027 
SC1 
Rt proliferation behind fence in unstable soils.  Provides no access or 
connectivity 
RJ1028 
SC1 
Rt behind locked gate with no other access 
RJ1029 
SC1 
Rt proliferation behind fence in unstable soils.  Provides no access or 
connectivity 
RJ1030 
SC1 
Short rt from private land.  Access provided by 1001 
RJ1031 
SC4 
Short mc rt provides little rec opp 
RJ1032 
SC4 
MC rt with similar access to 1003 
RJ1033 
SC4 
Infrequently used mc rt onto private land 
RJ1034 
SC4 
Provides similar access as 1003 
RJ1035 
SC4 
Access is provided by rts 1001 and 1003.  Erosion prone area 
RJ1036 
SC4 
Short mc rt is redundant with 1001 
RJ1037 
SC4 
Short mc rt is redundant with 1001 
RJ1038 
SC1 
Dead end rt provides no apparent rec opp 
RJ1039 
SC5 
Short secondary single track dead ends 
Appendices 
Juniper Subregion Route Designation Table (cont.) 
Route 
Number 
Designation 
Original 
Decision 
Tree 
Comments 
RJ1040 
NA 
Access to county water tank 
RJ1041 
SC7 
Parallel to 1042 
RJ1042 
SO6 
Provides scenic views along the length of the rt 
RJ1043 
SC5 
Short, dead end rt provides little rec opp 
RJ1044 
SO2 
Continuation of public rd to scenic view 
RJ1045 
SC5 
Very short redundant rt 
RJ1046 
SC5 
Short dead end rt parallel to a similar rt 
RJ1047 
SC5 
Short dead end rt parallel to a similar rt 
RJ1048 
SC5 
Short loop off 1011 provides little rec and no access 
RJ1049 
NA 
Access to private property 
RJ1050 
NA 
Access to guzzler 
RJ1052 
SC4 
Gated rt to trespass dwelling 
RJ1053 
SO7 
Series of short rts around quarry 
RJ1054 
SC1 
Rt accesses Stone Spring.  Foot access from nearby rt is possible 
RJ1055 
Rt does not exist 
RJ1056 
SO5 
Rt will help preserve a single track network in this area 
RJ1057 
SO5 
Part of MC network helps provide access from AV to FS 
RJ1058 
SC4 
New rt endangers riparian areas, sensitive species, and cultural sites. 
RJ1059 
SO5 
Part of MC network helps proved access from AV to FS 
RJ1060 
SC4 
Rt accesses Cottonwood Spring.  Increased use or misuse of this rt would 
result in unacceptabl 
RJ2001 
SC1 
Short cut MC route cuts corner on powerline road (1019) 
RJ2002 
SC4 
Rough light, infrequently used rd provides access off powerline road to hill 
climbs. 
RJ2003 
SO5 
Route provides MC access between RJ1019 and RJ2004 
RJ2004 
SO7 
Graded road provides access to scenic vista S of powerline road 
RJ2005 
SC1 
MC Route in parallel to 2004 
RJ2006 
SC1 
MC route is parallel to 2004, 5,7 and promotes access to a closed rd in SBNF 
RJ2007 
SC1 
MC route is parallel to 2004,5,6 and promotes access to a closed rd in SBNF 
RJ2008 
SC1 
Three short routes provide access to closed portion of SBNF 
RJ2009 
SC1 
Short spur route leads to hill climb 
RJ2010 
SO5 
Bowen Ranch Road 
RJ2011 
SC1 
Short loop rt provides access to no rec opp and enters closed portion of SBNF 
RJ2012 
SC1 
Short route provides access to Closed portion of SBNF 
RJ2013 
SC1 
Short duplicative route 
RJ2014 
SC1 
Duplicative route provides access to closed portion of SBNF 
RJ2015 
SO5 
MC Route provides rec access to Warm Springs Parking Area. 
RJ2016 
SO5 
Long distance backcountry vehicle rt also provides vehicle access to the Warm 
Springs lower pa 
RJ2017 
SC1 
Short short cut route 
RJ2018 
SC1 
Short route provides access to two hill climb locations 
RJ2019 
SC1 
Short cut route between 2024 and 2016 
RJ2020 
SC1 
Cuts corner 
RJ2021 
SC7 
Rt is parallel to major rt 2024 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested