how to upload and view pdf file in asp net c# : How to select text in pdf and copy Library SDK component .net wpf winforms mvc ofr_2010-12801-part334

Running CO2calc on Windows or Mac OS X   5
Entering Input Data
Under the Input tab, groupings of data include Physical 
Data, Adjusted Conditions, Nutrient Data, Carbonate Data, 
and Air-Sea CO
2
Flux (fig. 1). Each box should be filled in 
unless labeled “optional.” Under Carbonate Data, two of five 
carbonate parameters must be provided. If fields in Adjusted 
Conditions are left blank, Results at adjusted conditions will 
be the same as those in Results at input conditions. Use only 
pCO
2
or ƒCO
2
, not both. If more than two parameters are 
provided, the program will analyze the first two fields from 
the top down. If air-sea CO
2
flux is desired, both parameters 
(air pCO
2
and wind speed) must be provided. Clicking the 
“clear” button will clear all input fields.
Viewing and Exporting Output Data
To calculate the results, click the “Process” button in 
lower right of CO2calc. An error message will be displayed 
if there are insufficient input data, if there are commas in the 
sample name or comment (which would interfere with the 
creation of a comma-delimited output), or if any constants, 
units, and scales have not been selected. Results are then 
shown on the Results tab (fig. 4). There are two sub-tabs, 
Results (input conditions) and Results (adjusted), which 
correspond to the Results In and Results Out sections of the 
CO2SYS program of Pierrot and others (2006). 
Recording Calculations
Clicking the “Record” checkbox will launch a Save File 
dialog. A default file name is suggested based on the name 
field in the sample information section, if present. The path 
and filename of the new/selected file are displayed next to 
the checkbox. While a file is selected, the sample informa-
tion, input data, results at input conditions, results at adjusted 
conditions, flags for the constants and scales used in calcula-
tion, and the sample comment are then appended to the file 
(for the exact format and units, refer to table 1). On subse-
quent calculations, results are appended to the file incre-
mentally. To close the current file, uncheck the “Record” 
checkbox; to write to another file, uncheck and re-check the 
“Record” checkbox.
Batch Processing
To process a CSV file that contains multiple data points, 
click the “Batch Processing” tab at the top of the CO2calc 
window (fig. 5). 
Upon clicking the “Input File” button the user is 
prompted with an Open File dialog to select a file as input 
to CO2calc. The user must also select an output data file by 
clicking “Output File,” which opens up a Save File dialog. 
We have provided a template CSV file with CO2calc that 
can be filled with the appropriate numbers and saved under 
Figure 4.  Results (adjusted) page following a calculation in 
CO2calc for Windows and Mac OS X. 
Table 1.  CSV input format for CO2calc for Mac OS X and 
Windows.
Name
Format/Unit
SampleID
N/A
Name
N/A
Time
HH:MM:SS
Date
MO/DD/YYYY
Latitude
decimal degrees
Longitude
decimal degrees
Salinity
Practical salinity units
Temperature
degrees Celsius
Pressure
decibars
Total P
Micromole per kilogram seawater 
Total Si
Micromole per kilogram seawater
Temperature adjusted
degrees Celsius
TA
Micromole per kilogram seawater
TCO2
Micromole per kilogram seawater
pH
Chosen scale
fCO2
Microatmospheres
Seawater pCO2 in
Microatmosphere
Air pCO2
Microatmosphere
Windspeed
chosen units (knots or meters per second)
Comment
Chosen by user
How to select text in pdf and copy - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
text select tool pdf; how to select text in pdf
How to select text in pdf and copy - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf select text; how to select text in pdf image
   CO2calc: A User-Friendly Seawater Carbon Calculator for Windows, Mac OS X, and iOS (iPhone)
a different name and used as the input file. Input files should 
be UTF8-encoded CSV files that include a header line (see 
below) or a blank line first line; the following lines will be 
treated as comma-delimited data lines. As in Single-Point 
mode, if more than two carbonate parameters are entered, only 
the first two from the left will be used. If “Adjusted Condi-
tions” fields are left blank, Results at input conditions will be 
equal to Results at adjusted conditions. 
Example Header Line:
SampleID,Name,Time,Date,Lat,Lon,Salinity (psu), 
temperature(C),P (dbars), Total P (µmol/kgSW),Total Si 
(µmol/kgSW),temperature(C) adjusted,P (dbars) adjusted,TA 
(µmol/kgSW),TCO
2
(µmol/kgSW),pH,fCO
2
(µatm), pCO
2
Water (µatm),pCO
2
Air (µatm),Wind speed (m/s), Comment
Example Input data line:
1,“SAMP”,16:30:50, 4/13/2010, 25.183, –82.367, 35.0, 
22.0, , , , ,550.0, 8.1, , , , , 300.0, 5.0, “This is a comment”
In this example, Input fields are:
Sample ID (1),sample ID (“SAMP”),time (16:30:54),date 
(4/13/2010),latitude (25.183),longitude (–82.367),Salinity 
(35.000),temperature(26.0),TCO
2
(550.000),pH(8.1),pCO
2
Air 
(300.0),Wind speed (5.0),Comment (“This is a comment”)
Output data have the same format described in the previ-
ous section and listed in table 1.
CSV to KML/KMZ Translation
CO2calc allows the user to translate CSV files in the 
input format described above into Google Earth KML or KMZ 
files by clicking “File >> Convert CSV to KML…”. The user 
is prompted with an Open dialog to select one or more input 
files, and then a succession of save dialogs equal to the num-
ber of input files. On Mac OS X, the output files are simple 
KML files. On Windows, the output files are KMZ archives 
that include the CO2calc icon as a placemarker for datapoints 
when displayed. This KMZ may be opened directly using 
Google Earth, or, alternatively opened to view the contents by 
changing the file extension to .zip and unzipping it. In Google 
Earth, clicking a datapoint will display a popup containing a 
table with all post-calculation output data and sample informa-
tion (table 2).
Running CO2calc on iOS (iPhoneOS)
CO2calc may be downloaded to an iOS device (iPhone, 
iPad,
®
or iPod Touch
®
) from the Apple App Store. While the 
calculations within the iOS version of CO2calc are identical to 
those of the desktop version, the user interface is necessarily 
different given the handheld-optimized iOS platform. After a 
splash screen displays the credits, the user is presented with 
an Input page with text boxes for entering carbonate system 
parameters, salinity, temperature, and pressure. 
Entering Sample Information
Sample information can be edited by pressing a disclo-
sure button in the top right corner, which takes the user to the 
sample information page with text fields for name, number, 
comment, latitude, and longitude and pickers for date and time 
(fig. 6). When done, click “Input” to return to the Input page. 
Entering Input Data
On the Input page, the user is presented with a table with 
groupings of data including Physical Data, Nutrient Data, 
Adjusted Conditions, Carbonate Data, and Air-Sea CO
2
Flux 
(fig. 7). Each field should be filled in unless labeled “optional.” 
Under Carbonate Data, two of five carbonate parameters must 
be provided. Use only pCO
2
or ƒCO
2
, not both. If more than 
two parameters are provided, the program will analyze the first 
two fields from the top down. If air-sea CO
2
flux is desired, 
both air pCO
2
and wind speed must be provided.
Figure 5.  Batch Process File page of CO2calc for Mac OS X 
and Windows.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
search pdf for text; convert pdf to searchable text
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; pdf find text
Running CO2calc on iOS (iPhoneOS)    7
Viewing Output Data
To perform the calculation, 
click “Compute” in the top nav-
igation bar of the Input page. If 
the record switch at the top of 
the Input page is set to “ON,” 
the output will be recorded to 
a file. The user is then taken to 
the Results Adj. page (fig. 8) 
corresponding to the Results at 
Output Conditions section of 
CO2SYS. 
A navigation bar at the 
bottom of the screen allows 
the user to switch at any time 
between Input, Results (cor-
responding to the “Results at 
Input Conditions” of CO2SYS), 
Results (adj) (corresponding to 
the “Results at Output Condi-
tions” of CO2SYS), Constants 
(labeled “K”) and Information 
(labeled “More….”). On the 
Constants page (fig. 9), the user 
may select constants, units, and scales that are used in per-
forming the calculation. For each selection, a link is provided 
to the appropriate appendix that provides information on the 
options.
Table 2.  CSV output format for CO2calc for Mac OS X and 
Windows.
Name
Format/Unit
SampleID
N/A
Name
N/A
Time
HH:MM:SS
Date
MO/DD/YYYY
Latitude
decimal degrees
Longitude
decimal degrees
Salinity
Practical salinity units
Temperature
degrees Celsius
Pressure
decibars
Total P
Micromole per kilogram seawater 
Total Si
Micromole per kilogram seawater
TA
Micromole per kilogram seawater
TCO2
Micromole per kilogram seawater
pH
Chosen scale
fCO2
Microatmospheres
HCO3
Micromole per kilogram seawater
CO3
Micromole per kilogram seawater
CO2
Micromole per kilogram seawater
B Alk
Micromole per kilogram seawater
OH
Micromole per kilogram seawater
P Alk 
Micromole per kilogram seawater
Si Alk 
Micromole per kilogram seawater
Revelle
N/A
Omega Ca
N/A
Omega Ar
N/A
xCO2
Parts per million dry at 1 atmosphere
Temperature out
degrees Celsius
Pressure out
Decibars
Total P out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
Total Si out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
TA out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
TCO2 out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
pH out
Chosen scale
fCO2 out
Microatmospheres
HCO3 out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
CO3 out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
CO2 out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
B Alk out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
OH out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
P Alk  out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
Si Alk  out
Micromole per kilogram seawater
Revelle out
N/A
Omega Ca out
N/A
Omega Ar out
N/A
xCO2 out
Parts per million dry at 1 atmosphere
pCO2_air
Microatmosphere
Windspeed
chosen units (knots or meters per second)
Air-sea CO2flux input
Millimole per square meter per day
Air-sea CO2flux output
Millimole per square meter per day
CO2 constants
Set of constants used
KHSO4
Constant used
Air-Sea Flux
Constant used
Windspeed Units
Unit used
pH scale
Scale used
Comment
Chosen by user
Figure 6.  The Sample Info 
page of CO2calc for iOS.
Figure 7.  Input page of 
CO2calc for iOS. 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
how to make a pdf file text searchable; search text in pdf using java
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text
pdf search and replace text; convert pdf to word searchable text
   CO2calc: A User-Friendly Seawater Carbon Calculator for Windows, Mac OS X, and iOS (iPhone)
The About (information) 
page of CO2calc (fig. 10) 
presents a menu from which 
the user may access citation 
information for publications 
and contact information if the 
user has questions. The user 
may also access the appen-
dixes that describe the various 
aspects of the application. For 
the most part, these appendixes 
have been adapted from those 
provided by Pierrot and others 
(2006); one major addition is 
the section “Air-sea CO
2
Flux” 
that describes the equations, 
constants, and references used 
in the air-sea CO
2
flux calcula-
tions of CO2calc. 
Deleting and Emailing 
Stored Calculations
If the record switch on the input page is set to “On” and 
a filename is provided on the sample information page, the 
results of the calculation are recorded to a file each time  
“Process” is clicked. The user can choose to delete these files 
or send them as an attachment to an email message by clicking 
on “More” in the lower right hand corner and then selecting 
the topmost navigation button, entitled “Data Management.” 
The user selects one or more files from the list and chooses 
either “Delete” or “Mail” from a bar that appears at the bottom 
of the screen once a file is selected. “Delete” permanently 
removes the calculations from the iPhone’s memory. “Mail” 
opens up an email with the selected file or files attached; 
thereafter the user fills in the To: and Subject: fields and sends 
the email. A confirmation of the completed operation (“File(s) 
Sent!” or “Files Deleted!”) appears on the file management 
page upon successful completion of the operation. The user 
may return to the input page at any time by clicking the appro-
priate navigation button in the upper left corner. Note that a 
data file is not created until the first point is processed while 
the record switch is set to “On.”
Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge Rik Wanninkhof and 
David Ho for their help with the air-sea CO
2
flux calculations 
and Ernie Lewis, Doug Wallace, and Denis Pierrot for permis-
sion to reproduce documentation of the original code and 
descriptions from Lewis and Wallace (1998) and Pierrot and 
others (2006). We also thank those who have reviewed and 
tested CO2calc on various platforms.
References Cited
Berner, R.A., 1976, The solubility of calcite and aragonite in 
seawater at atmospheric pressure and 34.5 salinity: Ameri-
can Journal of Science, v. 276, p. 713–730.
Butler, J.N., 1992, Alkalinity titration in seawater—How 
accurately can the data be fitted by an equilibrium model?: 
Marine Chemistry, v. 38, no. 3–4, p. 251–282. 
Figure 8.  Results page of 
CO2calc for iOS. 
Figure 9.  Constants and 
scales page for CO2calc for iOS.
Figure 10.  The About (information) 
page for CO2calc for iOS.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Select pages Description: Copy specified page from the input PDF file
find text in pdf files; how to select text in pdf and copy
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Select text and image on PDF document. 2.
pdf text select tool; search pdf documents for text
References Cited    9
Culberson, C.H., 1981, Direct potentiometry, in Whitfield, M., 
and Janger, D., eds., Marine Electrochemistry: Chichester, 
Wiley, p. 187–261.
Culberson, C.H., and Pytkowicz, R.M., 1968, Effect of pres-
sure on carbonic acid, boric acid, and pH of seawater: 
Limnology and Oceanography, v. 13, p. 403–417.
Culkin, F., 1965, The major constituents, chap. 4 of Riley, J.P., 
and Skirrow, G., eds., Chemical oceanography: New York, 
Academic Press, p. 121–161.
Dickson, A.G., 1981, An exact definition of total alkalinity and 
a procedure for the estimation of alkalinity and total inor-
ganic carbon from titration data: Deep Sea Research Part A, 
Oceanographic Research Papers, v. 28, no. 6, p. 609–623. 
Dickson, A.G., 1984, pH scales and proton-transfer reactions 
in saline media such as sea water: Geochimica et Cosmochi-
mica Acta, v. 48, no. 11, p. 2299–2308. 
Dickson, A.G., 1990a, Standard potential of the reaction 
AgCl(s) + .5H
2
(g) = Ag(s) + HCl(aq) and the standard acid-
ity constant of the ion HSO4– in synthetic sea water from 
273.15 to 318.15 K: The Journal of Chemical Thermody-
namics, v. 22, no. 2, p. 113–127. 
Dickson, A.G., 1990b, Thermodynamics of the dissociation of 
boric acid in synthetic seawater from 273.15 to 318.15 K: 
Deep Sea Research Part A, Oceanographic Research Papers, 
v. 37, no. 5, p. 755–766. 
Dickson, A.G., 1993, pH buffers for sea water media based 
on the total hydrogen ion concentration scale: Deep Sea 
Research Part I, Oceanographic Research Papers, v. 40, 
no. 1, p. 107–118. 
Dickson, A.G., 2010, The carbon dioxide system in sea-
water—Equilibrium chemistry and measurements, in 
Riebesell, U., Fabry, V.F., Hansson, L., and Gattuso, J.-P., 
eds., Guide to best practices for ocean acidification research 
and data reporting: European Commission, Publications 
Office of the European Union, p. 17–40.
Dickson, A.G., and Goyet, C., eds., 1994, Handbook of meth-
ods for the analysis of the various parameters of the carbon 
dioxide system in sea water (2d ed.): Department of Energy, 
ORNL/CDIAC-74.
Dickson, A.G., and Millero, F.J., 1987, A comparison of the 
equilibrium constants for the dissociation of carbonic acid 
in seawater media: Deep Sea Research Part A, Oceano-
graphic Research Papers, v. 34, no. 10, p. 1733–1743. 
Dickson, A.G., and Riley, J.P., 1979, The estimation of acid 
dissociation constants in seawater media from potentio-
metric titrations with strong base. I. The iconic product of 
water-K
W
: Marine Chemistry, v. 7, no. 2, p. 89–99. 
Dickson, A.G., Sabine, C.L., and Christian, J.R., eds., 2007, 
Guide to best practices for ocean CO
2
measurements: 
PICES Special Publication v. 3, 191 p. 
Edmond, J.M., and Gieskes, T.M., 1970, On the calculation of 
the degree of saturation of seawater with respect of calcium 
carbonate under in situ conditions: Geochemica et Cosmo-
chimica Acta, v. 34, p. 1261–1291.
Goyet, C., and Poisson, A., 1989, New determination of 
carbonic acid dissociation constants in seawater as a func-
tion of temperature and salinity: Deep Sea Research Part A, 
Oceanographic Research Papers, v. 36, no. 11,  
p. 1635–1654. 
Hansson, I., 1973a, The determination of dissociation con-
stants of carbonic acid in synthetic sea water in the salinity 
range of 20–40 ppt and temperature range of 5–30 C: Acta 
Chemica Scandinavica, v. 27, p. 931–944. 
Hansson, I., 1973b, A new set of acidity constants for carbonic 
acid and boric acid in seawater: Deep Sea Research and 
Oceanographic Abstracts, v. 20, no. 5, p. 461–478.
Harned, H.S., and Bonner, F.T., 1945, The first ionization of 
carbonic acid in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride: Jour-
nal of the American Chemical Society, v. 67, p. 1026–1031.
Harned, H.S., and Davis, R., 1943, The ionization of constant 
carbonic acid in water and the solubility of carbon dioxide 
in water and aqueous salt solutions from 0 to 50 degrees: 
Journal of the American Chemical Society, v. 65, no. 10, 
p. 2030–2037.
Harned, H.S., and Owen, B.B., 1958, The physical chemistry 
of electrolyte solutions: New York, Reinhold Publishing 
Corp., 607 p.
Harned, H.S., and Scholes, S.R., 1941, The ionization constant 
of HCO
3
from 0 to 50 degrees C: Journal of the American 
Chemical Society, v. 63, no. 6, p. 1706–1709.
Ho, D.T., Law, C.S., Smith, M.J., Schlosser, P., Harvey, M., 
and Hill, P., 2006, Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at 
high wind speeds in the Southern Ocean: Implications for 
global parameterizations: Geophysical Research Letters, 
v. 33, no. L16611.
Ingle, S.E., 1975, Solubility of calcite in the ocean: Marine 
Chemistry, v. 3, p. 301–319.
Ingle, S.E., Culberson, C.H., Hawley, J.E., and Pytkowicz, 
R.M., 1973, The solubility of calcite in seawater at atmo-
spheric pressure and 35 per mil salinity: Marine Chemistry, 
v. 1, p. 295–307. 
Kester, D.R., and Pytkowicz, R.M., 1967, Determination 
of the apparent dissociation constants of phosphoric acid 
in seawater: Limnology and Oceanography, v. 12, no. 2, 
p. 243–252. 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
text searchable pdf file; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
pdf find and replace text; select text in pdf
10    CO2calc: A User-Friendly Seawater Carbon Calculator for Windows, Mac OS X, and iOS (iPhone)
Khoo, K.H., Ramette, R.W., Culberson, C.H., and Bates, R.G., 
1977, Determination of hydrogen ion concentrations in 
seawater from 5 to 40 ºC—Standard potentials at salini-
ties from 20 to 45‰: Analytical Chemistry, v. 49, no. 1, 
p. 29–34.
Lee, Kitack, Millero, F.J., Byrne, R.A., Feely, R.A., and  
Wanninkhof, Rick, 2000, The recommended dissocia-
tion constants for carbonic acid in seawater: Geophysical 
Research Letters, v. 27, no. 2, p. 229–232.
Lewis, E., and Wallace, D., 1998, Program developed for CO
2
system calculations: Oak Ridge TN, Oak Ridge National 
Laboratory Environmental Sciences Division, v. 4735.
Li, Y.-H., Takahashi, T., and Broecker, W.S., 1969, Degree of 
saturation of CaCO
3
in the oceans: Journal of Geophysical 
Research, v. 74, no. 23, p. 5507–5525. 
Liss, P.S., and Merlivat, L., 1986, Air-sea gas exchange 
rates—Introduction and synthesis, in Baut-Menard, P., ed., 
The role of air-sea exchange in geochemical cycling: Bos-
ton, Reidel, p. 113–129.
Lueker, T.J., Dickson, A.G., and Keeling, C.D., 2000, Ocean 
pCO
2
calculated from dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, 
and equations for K1 and K2—Validation based on labora-
tory measurements of CO
2
in gas and seawater at equilib-
rium: Marine Chemistry, v. 70, p. 105–119. 
Lyman, J., 1957, Buffer mechanism of sea water: Los Angeles, 
University of California, Ph.D. thesis.
Mehrbach, C., Culberson, C.H., Hawley, J.E., and Pytkowicz, 
R.M., 1973, Measurement of the apparent dissociation con-
stants of carbonic acid in seawater at atmospheric pressure: 
Limnology and Oceanography, v. 18, p. 897–907. 
Millero, F.J., 1979, The thermodynamics of the carbonate sys-
tem in seawater: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, v. 43, 
no. 10, p. 1651–1661. 
Millero, F.J., 1983, Influence of pressure on chemical pro-
cesses in the sea, in Riley, J.P., and Chester, R., eds., Chemi-
cal oceanography (2d ed.): New York, Academic Press, 
p. 1–88.
Millero, F.J., 1995, Thermodynamics of the carbon dioxide 
system in the oceans: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 
v. 59, no. 4, p. 661–667. 
Millero, F.J., 2010, Carbonate constants for estuarine waters: 
Marine and Freshwater Research, v. 61, p. 139–142.
Millero, F.J., Graham, T.B., Huang, F., Bustos-Serrano, H., 
and Pierrot, D., 2006, Dissociation constants of carbonic 
acid in seawater as a function of salinity and temperature: 
Marine Chemistry, v. 100, p. 80–94. 
Millero, F.J., Zhang, J.-Z., Fiol, S., Sotolongo, S., Roy, R.N., 
Lee, K., and Mane, S., 1993, The use of buffers to mea-
sure the pH of seawater: Marine Chemistry, v. 44, no. 2–4, 
p. 143–152. 
Morris, A.W., and Riley, J.P., 1966, The bromide/chlorin-
ity and sulphate/chlorinity ratio in seawater: Deep-Sea 
Research, v. 13, no. 4, p. 699–705. 
Mucci, A., 1983, The solubility of calcite and aragonite in 
seawater at various salinities, temperatures, and one atmo-
sphere total pressure: American Journal of Science, v. 283, 
p. 781–799.
Nightingale, P.D., Malin, G., Law, C.S., Watson, A.J., Liss, 
P.S., Liddicoat, M.I., Boutin, J., and Upstill-Goddard, R.C., 
2000, In situ evaluation of air-sea gas exchange param-
eterizations using novel conservative and volatile tracers: 
Global Biogeochemical Cycles, v. 14, p. 373–387.
Peng, T.H., Takahashi, T., Broecker, W.S., and Olafsson, J., 
1987, Seasonal variability of carbon dioxide, nutrients and 
oxygen in the northern Atlantic surface water—Observa-
tions and a model: Tellus, v. 39B, p. 439–458. 
Pierrot, D., Lewis, E., and Wallace, D.W.R., 2006, MS Excel 
program developed for CO
2
system calculations: ORNL/
CDIAC-105a, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Cen-
ter Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of 
Energy, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
Riley, J.P., 1965, The occurrence of anomalously high fluoride 
concentrations in the North Atlantic: Deep Sea Research 
and Oceanographic Abstracts, v. 12, no. 2, p. 219–220. 
Riley, J.P., and Skirrow, G., 1965, Chemical oceanography (1st 
ed.): New York, Academic Press. 
Roy, R.N., Roy, L.N., Vogel, K.M., Porter-Moore, C., Pearson, 
T., Good, C.E., Millero, F.J., and Campbell, D.M., 1993, 
The dissociation constants of carbonic acid in seawater at 
salinities 5 to 45 and temperatures 0 to 45 C: Marine Physi-
cal Chemistry, v. 44, no. 2–4, p. 249–267. 
Sillen, L.G., Martell, A.E., and Bjerrum, J., 1964, Stability 
constants of metal-ion complexes (2 ed.): London, Chemi-
cal Society (Great Britain), Special Publication 17.
Takahashi, T., Williams, R.T., and Bos, D.L., 1982, Car-
bonate chemistry, in Broecker, W.S., Spencer, D.W., and 
Craig, H., eds., GEOSECS Pacific Expedition, Volume 3, 
Hydrographic Data 1973–1974: Washington, DC, National 
Science Foundation.
Uppstrom, L.R., 1974, The boron/chlorinity ratio of deep-
sea water from the Pacific Ocean: Deep Sea Research and 
Oceanographic Abstracts, v. 21, no. 2, p. 161–162. 
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy, Paste PDF Pages. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text
converting pdf to searchable text format; cannot select text in pdf file
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Select text and image on PDF document. 2.
select text in pdf file; pdf editor with search and replace text
Appendix A. – Constants    11
Wanninkhof, R., 1992, Relationship between wind speed 
and gas exchange over the ocean: Journal of Geophysical 
Research, v. 97, no. 5, p. 7373–7382. 
Weiss, R.F., 1974, Carbon dioxide in water and seawater—The 
solubility of a non-ideal gas: Marine Chemistry, v. 2, no. 3, 
p. 203–215. 
Weiss, R.F., and Price, B.A., 1980, Nitrous oxide solubil-
ity in water and seawater: Marine Chemistry, v. 8, no. 4, 
p. 347–359. 
Appendixes
The following appendixes are excerpts from Lewis and 
Wallace (1998) as reported in Pierrot and others (2006) so 
that the reader has easy access to the original document when 
using CO2calc. Only minor grammatical or typographical 
technical edits have been made to these documents.
Appendix A. – Constants
The recommended dissociation constants vary depending 
on which parameters are measured, the pH scale being used, 
and on salinity.  The user of the program needs to consider 
these issues when choosing which set of constants to use. For 
example:
(1) Lee and others (2000) recommend using Mehrbach (1973) 
as refit by Dickson and Millero [noted simply as K1,K2 (Meh-
rback, 1973) in CO2calc] for a wide range of salinities.
(2) Dickson and others (2007) and Dickson (2010, table 1.1) 
recommends using the Lueker and others (2000) constants.
(3) However, Millero (2010) cautions against using the Lueker 
constants in dilute seawater (i.e., estuarine waters) where 
salinities are below 15. Within CO2calc, we have added Mil-
lero (2010) to the list of possible constants. These constants 
were modified from Millero and others (2006). 
The following section, except for the Lueker and Millero 
equilibrium constants section, is an excerpt from Lewis and 
Wallace (1998) as reported in Pierrot and others (2006). Note 
that the notations K1, K2, KW, etc., are printed exactly as 
written, but obviously refer to K
1
, K
2
, K
W
, etc. :
“Constants are converted to the appropriate pH scale 
and concentration scale, if needed, before calcula-
tions are made. 
“The value of K
0
(the solubility coefficient of CO
2
and the conversion between the fugacity and the 
partial pressure of CO
2
are from Weiss (1974). 
“The vapor pressure of H
2
O above seawater is from 
Weiss and Price (1980). The concentrations of sul-
fate and fluorine are from Morris and Riley (1966) 
and Riley (1965), respectively. 
“The value of KSO
4
, the dissociation constant for 
HSO
4
, is from either Khoo and others (1977) or 
Dickson (1990a). 
“KF, the dissociation constant for HF, is from 
Dickson and Riley (1979). Constants for calcium 
solubility and for pressure effects are given in other 
information sections. 
“The value of KB (for boric acid), in constant 
choices 1 to 5, is from Dickson (1990b).
GEOSECS and Peng and other (1987) choices 
use Lyman’s KB, the fit being from Li and others 
(1969). 
“The boron concentration in constant choices 1 to 5 
is from Uppstrom (1974). 
“The GEOSECS and Peng choices, are from Culkin 
(1965). 
“Values of KW (for H
2
O), KP1, KP2, and KP3 (for 
phosphoric acid), and KSi (for silicic acid) are from 
(Millero, 1995) (in constant choices 1 to 5) (note 
that some typos and inconsistencies from this paper 
were corrected). 
“The Peng choice uses KP2 and KP3 from Kester 
and Pytkowicz (1967), and KSi from Sillen and oth-
ers (1964). For the Peng and the freshwater choice, 
KW is from Millero (1979). For the freshwater 
choice, the fit is a refit of data from Harned and 
Owen (1958).
“Several determinations of K1 and K2 of carbonic 
acid have been made: Hansson (1973a, b) on the 
total pH scale, Mehrback and others (1973) on the 
NBS pH scale, Goyet and Poisson (1989) on the 
seawater pH scale, Roy and others (1993) on the 
total pH scale, and Lueker and others (2000) on the 
total pH scale.
“The data of Hansson (1973a,b) and Mehrbach and 
others (1973), both separately and together, have 
been refit by Dickson and Millero (1987) on the 
seawater scale. 
GEOSECS and Peng and others (1987) used the fit 
given in Mehrbach and others (1973). For freshwa-
ter, Millero (1979) refit data from Harned and Davis 
(1943) for K1 and Harned and Scholes (1941) for 
K2.”
12    CO2calc: A User-Friendly Seawater Carbon Calculator for Windows, Mac OS X, and iOS (iPhone)
The following are approximate precisions of the fits of 
the data:
Author
K
1
K
2
Roy and others (1993)
2%
1.5%
Goyet and Poisson (1989)
2.5%
4.5%
Hansson (1973 a,b) refit by Dickson Millero (1987) 3%
4%
Mehrbach and others (1973) refit by Dickson  
Millero (1987)
2.5%
4.5%
Dickson and Millero (1987) combined fit
4%
6%
Mehrbach and others (1973) fit
1.2%
2%
freshwater choice
0.5%
0.7%
Lueker Equilibrium Constants
(The following is new to the program)
Based on the recommendations of Dickson and others 
(2007), we have added the option of using K
1
and K
2
of car-
bonic acid as determined by Lueker and others (2000). These 
constants are based on the total pH scale.
Taken directly from Dickson and others (2007):
“The equilibrium constant …K
1
… is given by the 
expression (Lueker and others, 2000):
0
10
1
2
3633.86
log ( / )
61.2172 9.67770
( / )
ln( / ) 0.011555
0.0001152
K k
T K
T K
S
S
=
+
+
where k
o
= 1 mol kg-soln
-1
, T is Kelvin, and S is salinity 
at S = 35 and T= 25 
o
C (298.15 K), log
10
(K
1
/ k
o
) = –5.8472.
The equilibrium constant for …K
2
… is given by the 
expression (Lueker and others, 2000):
0
10
2
2
471.78
log ( / )
25.9290 3.16967
( / )
ln( / ) 0.01781
0.0001122
K
k
T K
T K
S
S
=
+
+
where k
o
= 1 mol kg-soln
-1 
at S = 35 and T= 25 
o
C (298.15 K), 
log
10
(K
2
/ k
o
) = –8.9660.”
Millero (2010) Constants for Estuarine 
Waters 
(The following is new to the program)
We have added the option of using K
1
and K
2
of carbonic 
acid as determined by Millero (2010). The constants were 
based on the seawater scale. The following equations were 
taken from Millero (2010):
“pK
i
− pK
0
i
= A
i
+ B
i
/T + C
i
ln T
where T is the absolute temperature and A
i
, B
i
and C
i
are salin-
ity dependent constants. 
“The values of pK
0
i
in pure water are taken from Harned and 
Scholes (1941) and Harned and Bonner (1945), then fitted to 
the following equations (Millero and others, 2006):
pK
0
1
= −126.34048 + 6320.813/T + 19.568224 ln T 
pK
0
2
= −90.18333 + 5143.692/T + 14.613358 ln T 
“The values of the adjustable parameters A
i
, B
i
and C
i
are:
A
i
= a
0
S
0.5
+ a
1
S + a
2
S
2
B
i
= a
3
S
0.5
+ a
4
C
i
= a
5
S
0.5 
Refer to Millero (2010) for further information.
Appendix C. fCO
2
, pCO
2
 13
Appendix B. – About pH
The following is an excerpt from Pierrot and others 
(2006):
“The various pH scales are inter-related by the fol-
lowing equations: 
αH = 10
-pHNBS 
= fH * Hsws
Htot
Hsws
Hfree
1 TS/KSO4 1 TS/KSO4 TF/KF
=
=
+
+
+
where αH is the activity and fH the activity coef-
ficient of the H+ ion (this includes liquid junction 
effects), TS and TF are the concentrations of SO
4
and fluorine, and KSO
4
and KF are the dissociation 
constants of HSO
4
and HF in seawater. 
“These conversions depend on temperature, salinity, 
and pressure. At 20 
o
C, Sal 35, and 1 atm, pH values 
on the total scale are (about) 0.09 units lower than 
those on the free scale, 0.01 units higher than those 
on the seawater scale, and 0.13 units lower than 
those on the NBS scale. The concentration units for 
αH on the NBS scale are mol/kg-H
2
O. The concen-
tration units used here for [H] on the other scales is 
mol/kg-SW (note that the free scale was originally 
defined in units of mol/kg-H
2
O). The difference 
between mol/kg-SW and mol/kg-H
2
O is about 
0.015 pH units at salinity 35 (the difference is nearly 
proportional to salinity). 
“The seawater scale was formerly referred to as the 
total scale, and each is still sometimes referred to as 
the other in the literature. The fit of fH used here is 
valid from salinities 20 to 40. fH has been found to 
be electrode-dependent, and does NOT equal 1 at 
salinity 0 due to the liquid junction potential. 
“Values on the NBS pH scale are only accurate to (at 
best) 0.005. All work on pressure effects on pH has 
assumed that fH is independent of pressure. Some of 
the pH scale conversions depend on pressure. 
“For discussions of the various pH scales, see Cul-
berson (1981), Dickson (1984), Butler (1992), Dick-
son (1993), and Millero and others (1993). Attention 
is required because in some of these papers the 
distinction between the total and seawater pH scales 
was not made.”
Appendix C. – ƒCO
2
, pCO
2
The following is an excerpt from Pierrot and others 
(2006):
“The fugacity of CO
2
(ƒCO
2
) in water is defined 
to be the fugacity of CO
2
in wet (100% water-
saturated) air which is in equilibrium with the water. 
pCO
2
, the partial pressure of CO
2
, is defined to be 
the product of the mole fraction of CO
in WET air 
and the total pressure. This is the same as the prod-
uct of the mole fraction of CO
2
in DRY air (xCO
2
(dry)) and (pTot – pH2O), where pH
2
O is the vapor 
pressure of water above seawater. At pressures of 
order 1 atm ƒCO
2
in air is about 0.3% lower than 
the pCO
2
due to the non-ideality of CO
2
(see Weiss, 
1974). This program assumes a pressure near 1 atm 
(where most equilibrators function) for the conver-
sion between partial pressure and fugacity. ƒCO
2
is 
related to TC and pH by the following equation: 
2
2
[CO ] TC
H H
fCO
K0
K0 H H K1 H K1 K2
=
=
∗ +
∗ +
where [CO
2
*] is the concentration of dissolved CO
2
K0 is the solubility coefficient of CO
2
in seawater, 
and K1 and K2 are the first and second dissociation 
constants for carbonic acid in seawater. 
“Units for ƒCO
2
and pCO
2
in this program are µatm 
(micro-atmospheres). The value of xCO
2
(dry) given 
in this program assumes pTot = 1 atmosphere. GEO-
SECS and Peng and others (1985) did not distin-
guish between ƒCO
2
and pCO
2
, nor did some other 
programs that we have evaluated.”
14    CO2calc: A User-Friendly Seawater Carbon Calculator for Windows, Mac OS X, and iOS (iPhone)
Appendix D. – KSO
4
The following is an excerpt from Pierrot and others 
(2006):
“KSO
4
is defined to be the dissociation constant for 
the reaction 
HSO
4
= H
+
+ SO
4
––
“Thus, 
KSO
4
= [H] * [SO
4
] / [HSO
4
].
“Two formulations of this are still in current usage: 
Khoo and others (1977) and Dickson (1990). 
The values of Dickson (1990) are now recom-
mended, though many older papers used values of 
Khoo and others (1977). They are between 15 to 
45% lower than those of Dickson (1990b), depend-
ing on temperature (mostly). 
“The main effect of this difference will occur when 
converting from one pH scale to another, or when 
working on a scale for which equilibrium constants 
must be converted (e.g., most constants were deter-
mined on either the total scale or the seawater scale). 
Use of the Dickson (1990) values when converting 
from the total pH scale to the free pH scale will 
result in pH values which are 0.015 to 0.03 units 
lower than those obtained using values of Khoo and 
others (1977).”
Appendix E. – Options
The following is an excerpt from Lewis and Wallace 
(1998) as reported by Pierrot and others (2006):
The Freshwater Option
“For the freshwater option only [HCO3], [CO3], 
[OH], and [H] are included in the definition of alka-
linity: TA = [HCO
3
] + 2[CO
3
] + [OH] – [H]. 
fH, the activity coefficient of H
+
, does NOT equal 1 
at salinity 0 due to liquid junction effects (included 
in its definition). It is also found to be electrode 
dependent. Thus, while the values of pH on the free, 
total, and seawater scales will coincide at salinity 
0, the value on the NBS scale will differ. For these 
reasons, for this choice only a pH value is given 
without reference to a pH scale. Constants used 
for this choice (K1, K2, and KW) are from Millero 
(1979); pressure effects on these constants are from 
Millero (1983).” 
The GEOSECS Option
“The GEOSECS option was designed to replicate 
the calculations performed in Takahashi and others 
(1982). That work used the NBS pH scale, the val-
ues of K1 and K2 from Mehrbach and others (1973), 
and the value of KB from Lyman [1957]. It did not 
include effects of OH, silicate, or phosphate, nor was 
there a correction for the non-ideality of CO
2
(i.e., 
implying ƒCO
2
and pCO
2
are the same). Their boron 
concentration was about 1% lower than that used for 
the other choices in this program (except the choice 
of Peng and others (1985). 
“In GEOSECS, TA and TC values from titration 
were used to determine pCO
2
[H
2
CO
3
], [HCO
3
-
], [CO
3
--
], and pH, at P = 1 atm 
and in situ T; and [H
2
CO
3
], [HCO
3
-
], [CO
3
--
], aH, 
pH, ICP, and delta CO
3
-- 
for calcite and aragonite at 
in situ T and P, where aH = 10^(-pH), ICP = [Ca
++
]
[CO
3
--
], and delta CO
3
--
is the difference between 
[CO
3
--
] and its saturation level. These last three 
parameters were used to describe the saturation 
states of calcite and aragonite. In this program only 
omegas, dimensionless ratios, are output for this. 
A fit for fH was also given (for salinities 20 to 40) 
and is used to convert between pH scales in this 
program. 
“Some typographic errors in the GEOSECS report 
were noted and corrected: 
in the pressure dependence of K2 the given value 
26.4 should be 16.4, and the expression for ln KW 
should have C*ln T, not C/ln T. That these are cor-
rect can be seen by checking the original references. 
The ratio of Ksp(aragonite) / Ksp(calcite) is given as 
1.48 in the original reference (Berner, 1976), but the 
value of 1.45 given in GEOSECS was used both in 
that work and in this program as well for this choice. 
“The GEOSECS report also contains a discussion 
on the effects of OH, phosphate, and silicate (see 
p. 79–82, especially Table 1 on p. 81, of Chapter 3, 
Carbonate Chemistry, Takahashi and others (1982). 
From this, it can be seen how important these can 
be, especially for calculated values of ƒCO
2
(or 
pCO
2
). This table has a typo: 17.8 for Aw in Pacific 
Surface Water should be 7.8. 
The choice of Peng and others (1985) is very simi-
lar, and should be used instead if the values of OH, 
etc. are desired with these constants.”
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested