how to upload only pdf file in asp.net c# : Search text in pdf image Library control component .net web page azure mvc Part46-part439

Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-5 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Summarizing Data, 
Continued 
Cut-offs for 
alcohol 
consumption 
Five main indicators should be reported for alcohol consumption, including 
• lifetime abstainer; 
• last year abstainer; 
• hazardous drinking, defined as consuming 40-59.9g of pure alcohol on 
average per day for men, and 20-39.9g for women; 
• harmful drinking, defined as consuming 
60g of pure alcohol on average 
per day for men, and 
40g for women; 
• binge drinking, defined as drinking 
5 drinks in a row for men, and 
drinks in a row for women (18, 99, 100). 
Cut-offs for 
fruit and 
vegetable 
intake 
Eating less than five servings of fruit and/or vegetables per day is considered 
being a low fruit and vegetable intake and increases the risk to develop 
chronic diseases (46). 
Cut-offs for 
physical 
activity 
A person not meeting any of the following criteria is considered being 
physically inactive and therefore at risk of chronic disease: 
• 3 or more days of vigorous-intensity activity of at least 20 minutes per day; 
OR 
• 5 or more days of moderate-intensity activity or walking of at least 30 
minutes per day; OR 
• 5 or more days of any combination of walking, moderate- or vigorous-
intensity activities achieving a minimum of at least 600 MET-minutes per 
week (101-103).  
Cut-offs for 
obesity and 
overweight 
The body mass index (BMI) is a statistical measure of the weight of a person 
scaled according to height.  It is defined as the individual's body weight 
divided by the square of the height (kg/m
2
).   
A BMI 
25 indicates that a person is overweight, while a BMI 
30 indicates 
that the person is obese (57, 104-107). 
Cut-offs for 
raised blood 
pressure 
Blood pressure is commonly measured in mmHg. A person is considered 
being mildly hypertensive if the systolic value (SBP) 
140 mmHg and/or the 
diastolic value (DBP) 
90 mmHg. 
Moderate hypertension has been defined as SBP 
160 mmHg and/or DBP 
100 mmHg (108).  
Continued on next page 
Search text in pdf image - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
searching pdf files for text; search text in pdf image
Search text in pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to select text on pdf; convert pdf to word searchable text
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-6 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Summarizing Data, 
Continued 
Cut-offs for 
raised blood 
glucose 
Blood glucose is commonly measured after fasting.  It can be measured either 
by determining the glucose value in the venous blood, or in the capillary 
blood.  The corresponding cut-offs are slightly different.  Raised blood 
glucose has been defined as 
• plasma venous value 
7 mmol/l (equivalent to 
126 mg/dl) 
• capillary whole blood value 
6.1 mmol/l (equivalent to 
110 mg/dl) (109).  
Cut-offs for 
abnormal blood 
lipids 
The two main lipids in the blood are cholesterol and triglycerides and 
therefore, different indicators should be reported for blood lipids: 
• total blood cholesterol 
190 mg/dl (equivalent to 5.0 mmol/L); 
• total blood cholesterol 
240 mg/dl (equivalent to 6.2 mmol/L); 
• HDL cholesterol < 50 mg/dl for men and <40 mg/dl for women (equivalent 
to 1.3 mmol/L for men and 1.0 mmol/L for women); 
• triglycerides 
180 mg/dl (equivalent to 2.0 mmol/L); 
• triglycerides 
150 mg/dl (equivalent to 1.7 mmol/L) (110-113). 
Estimates and 
true values 
Prevalence, mean and median are estimated values, as they usually derive 
from a sample, and not from the target population (for more on sampling, see 
Part 2, Section 2).  In order to give information on how uncertain estimated 
values are, confidence intervals are computed around the estimate.   
Standard error 
and Confidence 
Interval (CI) 
A standard error is the standard deviation of an estimate, e.g. a mean.  It can 
be used to calculate confidence intervals. 
A confidence interval is a computed interval with a given probability, e.g. 
95%, that the true value of a variable such as a mean or a prevalence is 
contained within the interval (96). 
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
pdf find highlighted text; convert pdf to searchable text
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
text searchable pdf; search a pdf file for text
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-7 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Displaying Results 
Introduction 
Results can be displayed by either describing summary statistics such as 
prevalence, mean or median in words, or by using tables and graphs.  
Sometimes, visual methods can make the point much stronger than simply 
describing the data.  However, they need to prepared with sufficient care.  See 
the guidelines below for making good tables and graphs. 
Guidelines for 
making good 
tables and 
graphs 
The general guidelines below may help when preparing tables and graphs. 
• Each table or graph should contain enough information so that it can be 
interpreted without reference to the text. 
• Titles of tables and graphs should specifically describe the numbers 
included. 
• Decide on the point you wish to present, then choose the appropriate 
method. 
• Specify the units being used clearly. 
Guidelines for 
making good 
tables 
See guidelines below for making good tables. 
• Tables should always include, for all age groups, the number of respondents 
/ the denominator for which the table is made. 
• The total age group should be highlighted. 
• Confidence intervals, if available, should be included in tables. 
• Vertical lines in tables should be avoided. 
See an example of a prevalence table below. 
Example table 1. Percentage of daily smoker in country x, both sexes, 2006. 
Age group 
% daily smoker 
95% CI 
25-34 
1000 
20.0 
18.0-22.0 
35-44 
1500 
19.5 
18.5-20.5 
45-54 
1500 
23.6 
22.6-24.6 
55-64 
1000 
15.4 
13.4-17.4 
25-64 
5000 
19.7 
19.2-20.2 
Guidelines for 
making good 
graphs 
See guidelines below for making good graphs. 
• Mention the number of respondents for which the graph is made. 
• Be sparing and consistent with use of colors and fonts. 
• Emphasize one idea at a time in a graph. 
• Examples of graphs include pie charts, bar charts or line graphs. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
pdf text select tool; how to select text in pdf reader
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
pdf text searchable; pdf searchable text
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-8 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Interpretation of Results 
Introduction 
In order to deliver a meaningful message, results need to be interpreted 
carefully.  Influence factors such as sample size, response percentages, season 
of data collection or potential biases need to be thought through and taken 
into account when interpreting results.  Below are a few bullet points that help 
when interpreting results. 
Represen- 
tativeness of 
results 
Results should only be applied to the surveyed target population, and not be 
generalized to a broader population.   
Uncertainty of 
results 
Confidence intervals help to determine the uncertainty of the estimates.  The 
shorter the interval the better (114). 
Influence on 
results 
Think through carefully what could have influenced the results when 
interpreting them.  Potential influence factors include: 
• sample sizes (Are they high enough to have produced robust results for all 
subgroups?); 
• response rates (Are they high or low? Are they the same for all subgroups, 
or have some subgroups lower response rates than others? If so, why?); 
• social pressure (May people have answered in a specific way to certain 
questions because of social desirability?); 
• survey methodology (Could flaws/problems in survey methods have 
influenced results, e.g. problems in reaching working population during data 
collection?); 
• participant comprehension (Are there specific questions in the questionnaire 
that seemed not to be understood by respondents?); 
• season of data collection. 
Results in a 
context 
When interpreting results, it is useful to put results in a context.  As an 
example, you may want to find out about the amount of cigarettes being sold 
when looking into results for prevalence of cigarette smokers in a country.   
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
select text in pdf file; text select tool pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
how to select text in a pdf; select text pdf file
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-9 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Preparing and Distributing the Fact Sheet 
Introduction 
The Fact Sheet is a short summary of the key results of the STEPS chronic 
disease risk factor survey.  
Purpose 
The purpose of the Fact Sheet is to provide interested parties with the key 
findings of the survey and to highlight the issues that the main report will 
cover in more depth. 
Intended 
audience 
It is recommended that you distribute the Fact Sheet widely.  Consider 
sending copies to: 
• relevant government bodies and sponsoring organizations; 
• agencies and organizations who are likely to use the information to promote 
healthy lifestyles or determine health policies; 
• public, governmental and institutional (university) libraries; 
• press and other media (newspapers, radio and television); 
• websites dealing with chronic diseases and related health issues; 
• WHO Regional Office, STEPS focal point and the WHO Geneva STEPS 
team. 
Standardized 
format and 
results 
A STEPS Fact Sheet Template is available in Part 6, Section 3C.   Use this 
template to present the summarized results in a standardized format.  
If you have added optional questions that are not represented in this template, 
only include these in the Fact Sheet if they are particularly significant. 
Fact Sheet 
layout 
The STEPS Fact Sheet contains a short paragraph that briefly describes when 
and where the STEPS survey has been carried out, the scope of the survey, as 
well as age groups covered, overall sample size and response rates, and a 
short description of the sampling method.   
The Fact Sheet table contains blocks of results on tobacco use, alcohol 
consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, physical and 
biochemical measurements, and a summary of combined risk factors.  Lines 
in this table include brief descriptions of the most important indicators of 
each risk factor, followed by results columns for both sexes, males and 
females. 
The last lines on the Fact Sheet display contact details  of the respective 
STEPS country focal point. 
Continued on next page 
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR component. Professional PDF to text converting library
pdf searchable text converter; converting pdf to searchable text format
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
The following demo code will show how to replace text in specified PDF page. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Set the search options.
find text in pdf image; make pdf text searchable
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-10 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Preparing and Distributing the Fact Sheet, 
Continued 
Fact Sheet 
Analysis Guide 
The Fact Sheet Analysis Guide has been developed to help preparing the Fact 
Sheet.  It looks similar to the STEPS Fact Sheet, but instead of the results 
columns, it contains one column that displays the standard question code of 
the questions required to calculate results, and one column that includes the 
names of the Epi Info Programs that need to be run to produce the results.  
Process 
The table below lists the processes required to prepare your Fact Sheet and to 
generate the results for the Fact Sheet after all cleaning of the data has been 
completed.  Generic code for Epi Info has been written to generate all the 
indicators presented on the Fact Sheet.   
Stage 
Description 
Insert site name and year of STEPS survey in the heading of the 
Fact Sheet 
Insert the following in the text above the table on the Fact Sheet: 
• site name 
• months and year of STEPS survey 
• sampling design 
• sample size 
• response rate 
• year of planned repeat survey. 
In addition, all necessary adjustments need to be made to the text, 
such as to indicate whether or not Step 3 has been done. 
Insert contact details of your STEPS country focal point below the 
table. 
Determine which indicators on the Fact Sheet can be computed for 
your site using a copy of your site instrument and the column 
"Questions required to calculate result" on the Fact Sheet Analysis 
Guide. 
Using the Fact Sheet Analysis Guide, circle the names of the 
programs associated with the indicators that can be computed. 
Remove those rows from the Fact Sheet for which results can not 
be produced because the required questions have not been asked. 
Run all Epi Info programs circled on the Fact Sheet Analysis 
Guide (see Part 3, Section 6 for help with running programs in Epi 
Info). 
Continued on next page 
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-11 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Preparing and Distributing the Fact Sheet, 
Continued 
Process (cont.)  
Stage 
Description 
Copy the corresponding results (including confidence intervals) 
for both sexes, males and females for all indicators that can be 
computed from the output of the Epi Info programs into the Fact 
Sheet.  Prevalence, mean and median values should be in bold.  
Note that the Epi Info outputs are arranged in the way that results 
for men are displayed first, then women, then both sexes. 
• For lines on the Fact Sheet displaying prevalence values: Fill in 
the "Row %" along with the confidence intervals ("LCL" and 
"UCL") from the Epi Info outputs for the total age groups for 
both sexes, men and women. 
• For lines on the Fact Sheet displaying mean values: Fill in the 
mean values along with the confidence intervals ("Confidence 
Limits", "Lower" and "Upper") from the Epi Info outputs for the 
total age groups for both sexes, men and women.  Note that for 
outputs displaying mean values, the values for total age groups 
are displayed in separate tables. 
• For the lines on the Fact Sheet displaying median values: Fill in 
the median values along with the 25
th
and 75
th
percentile ("25%" 
and "75%") from the Epi Info outputs for the total  age groups 
for both sexes, men and women. 
Note: The generic Epi Info programs AgeRange2564 (or AgeRange1564) and 
MissingAgeSex should be run prior to running any other programs (see Part 
3, Section 6). 
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-12 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Preparing and Distributing the Data Book 
Introduction 
The Data Book is a full tabulation of all the results from the questions and 
measurements in the STEPS Instrument.   
Purpose 
The purpose of the Data Book is to: 
• compile a complete, standardized set of results relating to each question and 
measurement in the instrument; 
• provide a first step in the reporting process from which results for the site 
report can be extracted. 
Intended 
audience 
The Data Book should not be considered as a final document for presenting 
your STEPS survey results.  It is simply an intermediate step and helps in 
preparing your site report.  For a review of your Data Book, it is 
recommended that you share copies with: 
• WHO Regional Office, STEPS focal point and the  
• WHO Geneva STEPS team. 
Standardized 
format and 
results 
The STEPS Data Book template is available in Part 6, Section 3D.   Use this 
template to present the results of your STEPS survey in a standardized 
format.  
If you have added optional questions that are not represented in this template, 
you should add additional tables displaying results for those. 
Data Book 
layout 
The Data Book consists of: 
• the title page; 
• the second page including the table of contents and information on what Epi 
Info programs need to be run first; 
• ten topics, one for each section of your questionnaire. 
Under each topic, there are several tables that relate to the topic and the 
corresponding questions.  The table headings include a brief description of 
what is contained in the table, followed by the instrument question(s) that are 
needed to prepare these results.  
All tables in the Data Book include another brief heading in the first row, an 
indication on whether the table is for men, women, both sexes, or all three, a 
column with the age groups, a column with the "n" for the subgroups, and 
columns with the actual results (mean, median or prevalence) with confidence 
intervals.  Note that the tables in the section Demographic Information 
Results don't contain confidence intervals. 
Continued on next page 
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-13 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Preparing and Distributing the Data Book, 
Continued 
Data Book 
layout (cont.) 
The analysis information below each table displays the standard codes of the 
questions used and the Epi Info program names for the programs that need to 
be run to get the results for the corresponding table.  
Process 
Generic programs in Epi Info have been written to generate all the tables for 
the Data Book.  The table below lists the process required to fill in the tables 
in the Data Book. 
Note: The generic Epi Info programs AgeRange2564 (or AgeRange1564) and 
MissingAgeSex should be run prior to running any other programs (see Part 
3, Section 6). 
For assistance in generating code to analyse site-specific questions, contact 
the STEPS team. 
Stage 
Description 
Insert the name of your site/country in the title page of the Data 
Book. 
Identify which tables can be completed in the Data Book by 
referring to the "Analysis Information" section below each data 
table and using your site-specific instrument. 
Run the program for each table identified in step 1 above, and save 
the output (for information on how to run Epi Info programs see 
Part 3, Section 6). 
Copy the output of each program into the corresponding table in 
the Data Book.  Note that the Epi Info outputs are arranged in the 
way that results for men are displayed first, then women, then both 
sexes. 
• Fill in the "n" for all age groups.  The "n" indicates the number of 
individuals that have responded to a specific question; it is the 
denominator for the prevalence/mean/median values for each age 
group.  In Epi Info outputs displaying prevalence values, you can 
find the "n" in the "TOTAL" column for each age group, in the 
outputs displaying mean and median values, you can find the "n" 
in the "Obs" or "Count" column. 
• For tables displaying prevalence values: Fill in the "Row %" 
along with the confidence intervals ("LCL" and "UCL") from the 
Epi Info outputs for the corresponding age groups. 
• For tables displaying mean values: Fill in the mean values along 
with the confidence intervals ("Confidence Limits", "Lower" and 
"Upper") from the Epi Info outputs for the corresponding age 
groups. Note that for outputs displaying mean values, those 
values for total age groups are displayed in a separate table. 
• For the tables displaying median values: Fill in the median values 
along with the 25
th
and 75
th
percentile ("25%" and "75%") from 
the Epi Info outputs for the corresponding age groups. 
Part 4: Conducting the Survey, Data Entry, Data Analysis, and Reporting and Disseminating Results 
4-4-14 
Section 4: Reporting and Disseminating Results 
WHO STEPS Surveillance 
Last Updated: 28 March 2008 
Preparing and Distributing the Site Report 
Introduction 
The site report is the main comprehensive report for the whole STEPS 
chronic disease risk factor survey and must be produced at the end of the 
STEPS survey. 
A template that helps preparing the STEPS site report is in Part 6, Section 3E. 
Purpose 
Use the site report to present the following information: 
• the overall rationale 
• scope of the survey 
• the sampling design used 
• detailed methods of data collection 
• detailed results of the survey 
• implications for future health and planning 
• appendices including the site-specific instrument. 
Intended 
audience 
It is recommended that you distribute the site report widely.  Consider 
sending copies to: 
• relevant government bodies and sponsoring organizations; 
• agencies and organizations that are likely to use the information to promote 
chronic disease prevention and control; 
• public, governmental and institutional (university) libraries; 
• press and other media (newspapers, radio and television); 
• websites of any sponsoring bodies; 
• WHO STEPS Regional Office and the WHO Geneva STEPS team. 
Content guide 
The table below lists each of the main parts that should be included in the site 
report. 
• cover and content pages 
• executive summary 
• background 
• rationale of the survey 
• scope, sampling methods and implementation 
• analytical methods 
• results 
• discussion 
• conclusions and recommendations 
• references 
• appendices 
Note: Guidelines for completing each of these parts are provided in the 
STEPS site report template in Part 6, Section 3E. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested