how to upload only pdf file in asp.net c# : How to select all text in pdf file control Library system azure .net winforms console past3manual15-part448

151 
Diversity menu 
Diversity indices 
These statistics apply to association data, where number of individuals are tabulated in rows (taxa) 
and possibly several columns (samples). The available statistics are as follows, for each sample:  
Number of taxa (S)  
Total number of individuals (n)  
Dominance = 1-Simpson index. Ranges from 0 (all taxa are equally present) to 1 (one taxon 
dominates the community completely). 
i
i
n
n
D
2
where n
i
is number of individuals of taxon i.  
Simpson index 1-D. Measures 'evenness' of the community from 0 to 1. Note the confusion in 
the literature: Dominance and Simpson indices are often interchanged!  
Shannon index (entropy). A diversity index, taking into account the number of individuals as 
well as number of taxa. Varies from 0 for communities with only a single taxon to high values 
for communities with many taxa, each with few individuals. 

i
i
i
n
n
n
n
H
ln
Buzas and Gibson's evenness: e
H
/S  
How to select all text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
can't select text in pdf file; pdf find highlighted text
How to select all text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
converting pdf to searchable text format; text searchable pdf file
152 
Brillouin͛s index: 
 
n
n
n
HB
i
i
!
ln
ln !
Menhinick's richness index:  
n
S
Margalef's richness index: (S-1) / ln(n) 
Equitability. Shannon diversity divided by the logarithm of number of taxa. This measures the 
evenness with which individuals are divided among the taxa present.  
Fisher's alpha - a diversity index, defined implicitly by the formula S=a*ln(1+n/a) where S is 
number of taxa, n is number of individuals and a is the Fisher's alpha.  
Berger-Parker dominance: simply the number of individuals in the dominant taxon relative to 
n. 
Chao1, bias corrected: An estimate of total species richness. Chao1 = S + F
1
(F
1
- 1) / (2 (F
2
1)), where F
1
is the number of singleton species and F
2
the number of doubleton species. 
Many of these indices are explained in Harper (1999). 
Approximate confidence intervals for all these indices can be computed with a bootstrap procedure. 
The given number of random samples (default 9999) are produced, each with the same total number 
of individuals as in the original sample. For each individual in the random sample, the taxon is chosen 
with probabilities proportional to the original abundances. A 95 percent confidence interval is then 
calculated. Note that the diversity in the replicates will often be less than, and never larger than, the 
pooled diversity in the total data set – this bias can optionally be ͞fixed͟ by centering the confidence 
interval on the original value. 
Bootstrapped comparison of diversity indices in two samples is provided in the Compare diversities 
module. 
Reference 
Harper, D.A.T. (ed.). 1999. Numerical Palaeobiology. John Wiley & Sons. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page.
search text in multiple pdf; how to select text in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Dim allImages = PDFImageHandler.ExtractImages(doc) ' Extract all images in page 2. Dim page As PDFPage = doc VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
pdf searchable text; pdf text searchable
153 
Quadrat richness
Requires two or more columns, each containing presence/absence (1/0) of different taxa down the 
rows (positive abundance is treated as presence). 
Four non-parametric species richness estimators are included in PAST: Chao 2, first- and second-
order jackknife, and bootstrap. All of these require presence-absence data in two or more sampled 
quadrats of equal size. Colwell & Coddington (1994) reviewed these estimators, and found that the 
Chao2 and the second-order jackknife performed best. 
The output from Past is divided into two panels. First, the richness estimators and their analytical 
standard deviations (only for Chao2 and Jackknife1) are computed from the given set of samples. 
Then the estimators are computed from 1000 random resamplings of the samples with replacement 
(bootstrapping), and their means and standard deviations are reported. In other words, the standard 
deviations reported here are bootstrap estimates, and not based on the analytical equations.  
Chao2 
The Chao2 estimator (Chao 1987) is calculated as in EstimateS version 8.2.0 (Colwell 2009), with bias 
correction: 
1
2
1
1
ˆ
2
1
1
2
Q
Q Q
m
m
S
S
obs
Chao
where S
obs
is the total observed number of species, m the number of samples, Q
1
the number of 
uniques (species that occur in precisely one sample) and Q
2
the number of duplicates (species that 
occur in precisely two samples). 
If Q
1
>0 and Q
2
>0, variance is estimated as 
4
2
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
ˆ
ar
ˆ
v
Q
Q Q Q Q
m
m
Q
Q
Q
m
m
Q
Q Q
m
m
S
Chao
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
coding example shows you how to redact PDF text content Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' open document All Rights Reserved
how to select all text in pdf; search pdf files for text
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
C# coding example describes how to redact PDF text content. String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // open document All Rights Reserved
pdf select text; select text pdf file
154 
If Q
1
>0 but Q
2
=0: 
2
4
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
ˆ
4
1
4
1
2
1
2
1
1
ˆ
ar
ˆ
v
Chao
Chao
S
Q
m
m
Q
Q
m
m
Q Q
m
m
S
If Q
1
=0: 
obs
obs
M S
MS
obs
Chao
e
S e
S
1
ˆ
ar
ˆ
v
2
where M is the total number of occurrences of all species in all samples. 
Jackknife 1 
First-order jackknife (Burnham & Overton 1978, 1979; Heltshe & Forrester 1983): 
1
1
1
ˆ
Q
m
m
S
S
obs
jack
S
j
j
jack
m
Q
j f
m
m
S
0
2
1
2
1
1
ˆ
ar
ˆ
v
where f
j
is the number of samples containing j unique species. 
Jackknife 2 
Second-order jackknife (Smith & van Belle 1984): 
1
2
3
2
ˆ
2
2
1
2
mm
Q m
m
m
Q
S
S
obs
jack
No analytical estimate of variance is available. 
Bootstrap 
Bootstrap estimator (Smith & van Belle 1984): 
obs
S
k
m
k
obs
boot
p
S
S
1
1
ˆ
where p
k
is the proportion of samples containing species k. No analytical estimate of variance is 
available. 
References 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Framework 2.0 & above Able to select PDF document scaling. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf make text searchable
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Compatible with all Windows systems and supports .NET Framework 2.0 & above Able to select PDF document scaling. Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document.
search pdf documents for text; pdf text select tool
155 
Burnham, K.P. & W.S. Overton. 1978. Estimation of the size of a closed population when capture 
probabilities vary among animals. Biometrika 65:623-633. 
Burnham, K.P. & W.S. Overton. 1979. Robust estimation of population size when capture 
probabilities vary among animals. Ecology 60:927-936. 
Chao, A. 1987. Estimating the population size for capture-recapture data with unequal catchability. 
Biometrics 43, 783-791. 
Colwell, R.K. & J.A. Coddington. 1994. Estimating terrestrial biodiversity through extrapolation. 
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (Series B) 345:101-118. 
Heltshe, J. & N.E. Forrester. 1983. Estimating species richness using the jackknife procedure. 
Biometrics 39:1-11. 
Smith, E.P. & G. van Belle. 1984. Nonparametric estimation of species richness. Biometrics 40:119-
129. 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
13. Cancel. Unhighlight all search results on PDF. 14. Whole word. Select to search all text content filled in. 15. Ignore case.
find text in pdf image; make pdf text searchable
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
13. Cancel. Unhighlight all search results on PDF. 14. Whole word. Select to search all text content filled in. 15. Ignore case.
pdf text search tool; how to search text in pdf document
156 
Beta diversity
Two or more columns (samples) of presence-absence (0/1) data, with taxa in rows. 
The beta diversity module in Past can be used for any number of samples (not limited to only two 
samples). The eight measures available are described in Koleff et al. (2003):  
Past 
Koleff et al. 
Equation 
Ref. 
Whittaker 
b
w
1
S
Whittaker 
(1960) 
Harrison 
b
-1
1
1
N
S
Harrison 
et al. 
(1992) 
Cody 
b
c
 
 
2
lH
g H
Cody 
(1975) 
Routledge 
b
I
 
 
 
i
i
i
i
i
i
T
e
e
T
T
10
10
10
log
1
log
1
log
Routledge 
(1977) 
Wilson-Shmida  b
t
 
 
2
lH
g H
Wilson & 
Shmida 
(1984) 
Mourelle 
b
me
 
 
1
2
N
lH
gH
Mourelle 
& Ezcurra 
(1997) 
Harrison 2 
b
-2
1
1
max
N
S
Harrison 
et al. 
(1992) 
Williams 
b
-3
S
max
1
Williams 
(1996) 
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
example that you can use it to extract all images from Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by you how to copy pages from a PDF file and paste
select text in pdf file; find text in pdf files
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
PDF annotating tool, which is compatible with all Windows systems Click to select drawing annotation with default properties Click to add a text box to specific
search text in pdf using java; how to search a pdf document for text
157 
S: total number of species; 
: average number of species; N: number of samples; g(H): total gain of 
species along gradient (samples ordered along columns); l(H): total loss of species; e
i
: number of 
samples containing species i; T: total number of occurrences. 
References 
Harrison, S., S.J. Ross & J.H. Lawton. 1992. Beta diversity on geographic gradients in Britain. Journal 
of Animal Ecology 61:151-158. 
Koleff, P., K.J. Gaston & J.J. Lennon. 2003. Measuring beta diversity for presence-absence data. 
Journal of Animal Ecology 72:367-382. 
Routledge, R.D. 1977. On Whittaker͛s components of diversity. Ecology 58:1120-1127. 
Whittaker, R.H. 1960. Vegetation of the Siskiyou mountains, Oregon and California. Ecological 
Monographs 30:279-338. 
158 
Taxonomic distinctness
Requires one or more columns (samples), each containing counts of individuals of different 
taxa down the rows. In addition, one or more group columns with names of genera/families 
etc. (see below). 
Taxonomic diversity and taxonomic distinctness as defined by 
Clarke & Warwick (1998)
including confidence intervals computed from 1000 random replicates taken from the 
pooled data set (all samples). Note that the "global list" of Clarke & Warwick is not entered 
directly, but is calculated internally by pooling (summing) the given samples.  
These indices depend on taxonomic information also above the species level, which has to 
be entered for each species as follows. Species names go in the name column (leftmost; in 
the Row attributes), genus names in the first group column, family in second group column 
etc., up to four group columns. Of course you can substitute for other taxonomic levels as 
long as they are in ascending order. Species counts for the samples follow in the columns 
thereafter. 
Taxonomic distinctness in one sample is given by (note other, equivalent forms exist): 



i j
i
i
i
i j
i j
ij i i j
x x
xx
w xx
1 2
159 
where the w
ij
are weights such that w
ij
= 0 if i and j are the same species, w
ij
= 1 if they are 
the same genus, etc. The x are the abundances. 
Taxonomic distinctness: 


 
i j
i j
i j
ij i i j
xx
w xx
*
.
For presence-absence data, taxonomic diversity and distinctness will be valid but equal to 
each other. 
Reference 
Clarke, K.R. & Warwick, R.M. 1998. A taxonomic distinctness index and its statistical properties. 
Journal of Applied Ecology 35:523-531. 
160 
Individual rarefaction
For comparing taxonomical diversity in samples of different sizes. Requires one or more columns of 
counts of individuals of different taxa (each column must have the same number of values). When 
comparing samples: Samples should be taxonomically similar, obtained using standardised sampling 
and taken from similar 'habitat'. 
Given one or more columns of abundance data for a number of taxa, this module estimates how 
many taxa you would expect to find in a sample with a smaller total number of individuals. With this 
method, you can compare the number of taxa in samples of different size. Using rarefaction analysis 
on a large sample, you can read out the number of expected taxa for any smaller sample size 
(including that of the smallest sample). The algorithm is from Krebs (1989), using a log Gamma 
function for computing combinatorial terms. An example application in paleontology can be found in 
Adrain et al. (2000). 
Let N be the total number of individuals in the sample, s the total number of species, and N
i
the 
number of individuals of species number i. The expected number of species E(S
n
) in a sample of size n 
and the variance V(S
n
) are then given by 
s
i
i
n
n
N
n
N
N
ES
1
1
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested