181 
Mantel correlogram (and periodogram) 
This module expects several rows of multivariate data, one row for each sample. Samples are 
assumed to be evenly spaced in time. 
The Mantel correlogram (e.g. Legendre & Legendre 1998) is a multivariate extension to 
autocorrelation, based on any similarity or distance measure. The Mantel correlogram in PAST shows 
the average similarity between the time series and a time lagged copy, for different lags.  
The Mantel periodogram is a power spectrum of the multivariate time series, computed from the 
Mantel correlogram (Hammer 2007). 
The Mantel scalogram is an experimental plotting of similarities between all pairs of points along the 
time series. The apex of the triangle is the similarity between the first and last point. The base of the 
triangle shows similarities between pairs of consecutive points. 
Pdf find text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
make pdf text searchable; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
Pdf find text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search pdf documents for text; how to select text on pdf
182 
References 
Hammer, Ø. 2007. Spectral analysis of a Plio-Pleistocene multispecies time series using the Mantel 
periodogram. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 243:373-377. 
Legendre, P. & L. Legendre. 1998. Numerical Ecology, 2nd English ed. Elsevier, 853 pp. 
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
pdf search and replace text; search pdf for text
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
find text in pdf files; convert pdf to searchable text
183 
Runs test 
The runs test is a non-parametric test for randomness in a sequence of values such as a time series. 
Non-randomness may include such effects as autocorrelation, trend and periodicity. The module 
requires one column of data, which are internally converted to 0 (x≤0) or 1 (x>0). 
The test is based on a dichotomy between two values (x≤0 or x>0). It counts the number of runs 
(groups of consecutive equal values) and compares this to a theoretical value. The runs test can 
therefore be used directly for sequences of binary data. There are also options for ͞runs about the 
mean͟ ;the mean value subtracted from the data prior to testingͿ, or ͞runs up and down͟ (the 
differences from one value to the next taken before testing). 
With n the total number of data points, n
1
the number of points ≤0 and n
2
the number of points >0, 
the expected number of runs in a random sequence, and the variance, are 
 
n
nn
n
ER
1 2
2
 
1
2
2
2
1 2
1 2
n n
n
nn
nn
R
Var
With the observed number of runs R, a z statistic can be written as 
 
(R)
Var
R ER
z
The resulting two-tailed p value is not accurate for n<20. A Monte Carlo procedure is therefore also 
included, based on 10,000 random replicates using the observed n, n
1
and n
2
C# Excel - Search and Find Text in Excel
Easy to search and find text content and get its location details. Allow to search defined Excel file page or the whole document. C# PDF: Example of Finding Text
pdf text search tool; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
When you have downloaded the RasterEdge Image SDK for .NET, you can unzip the package to find the RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll in the bin folder under the root
find and replace text in pdf; how to select text in a pdf
184 
Mann-Kendall trend test 
A non-parametric test for trend. Requires a single column of data. Missing values are deleted, and n 
adjusted accordingly. The procedure follows Gilbert (1987). 
Data x
1
, ... x
n
are assumed to be ordered in sequence of collection time, or in spatial sequence.Define 
the indicator function 
0
1, ifx
0
0, ifx
0
1, ifx
sgnx
The S statistic is calculated by summing over all pairs of values: 


1
1
1
sgn
n
i
n
j i
i
j
x
x
S
S will be negative for a negative trend, zero for no trend, and positive for an increasing trend. 
For n≤10, the p value is taken from a table of exact values (Gilbert 1987). For n>10, a normal 
approximation is used, as follows. 
Determine the total number of groups of ties g and the number of tied values t
j
within each group, in 
the sorted sequence. Then estimate the standard deviation of S by 


 
g
j
j
j j
t
t t
n
nn
SD
1
5
1 2
5
1 2
18
1
The Z statistic, is then 
SD
S
Z
1
which is used to calculate p from the cumulative normal distribution as usual. The subtraction of 1 is 
a continuity correction. 
Reference 
Gilbert, R.O. 1987. Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring. Van Nostrand 
Reinhold, New York. 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
HTML5 Viewer for C# .NET, users can convert Excel to PDF document, export C#.NET RasterEdge HTML5 Viewer also enable users to quickly find text content by
how to select text in pdf; select text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
document. If you find certain page in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page directly. Moreover, when
select text pdf file; cannot select text in pdf file
185 
ARMA (and intervention analysis) 
Analysis and removal of serial correlations in time series, and analysis of the impact of an external 
disturbance ("intervention") at a particular point in time. Assumes stationary time series, except for a 
single intervention. Requires one column of equally spaced data. 
This powerful but somewhat complicated module implements maximum-likelihood ARMA analysis, 
and a minimal version of Box-Jenkins intervention analysis (e.g. for investigating how a climate 
change might impact biodiversity).  
By default, a simple ARMA analysis without interventions is computed. The user selects the number 
of AR (autoregressive) and MA (moving-average) terms to include in the ARMA difference equation. 
The log-likelihood and Akaike information criterion are given. Select the numbers of terms that 
minimize the Akaike criterion, but be aware that AR terms are more "powerful" than MA terms. Two 
AR terms can model a periodicity, for example.  
The main aim of ARMA analysis is to remove serial correlations, which otherwise cause problems for 
model fitting and statistics. The residual should be inspected for signs of autocorrelation, e.g. by 
copying the residual from the numerical output window back to the spreadsheet and using the 
autocorrelation module. Note that for many paleontological data sets with sparse data and 
confounding effects, proper ARMA analysis (and therefore intervention analysis) will be impossible.  
The program is based on the likelihood algorithm of Melard (1984), combined with nonlinear 
multivariate optimization using simplex search. 
Intervention analysis  
Intervention analysis proceeds as follows. First, carry out ARMA analysis on only the samples 
preceding the intervention, by typing the last pre-intervention sample number in the "last samp" 
box. It is also possible to run the ARMA analysis only on the samples following the intervention, by 
typing the first post-intervention sample in the "first samp" box, but this is not recommended 
because of the post-intervention disturbance. Also tick the "Intervention" box to see the optimized 
intervention model.  
The analysis follows Box and Tiao (1975) in assuming an "indicator function" u(i) that is either a unit 
step or a unit pulse, as selected by the user. The indicator function is transformed by an AR(1) 
process with a parameter delta, and then scaled by a magnitude (note that the magnitude given by 
PAST is the coefficient on the transformed indicator function: first do y(i)=delta*y(i-1)+u(i), then scale 
y by the magnitude). The algorithm is based on ARMA transformation of the complete sequence, 
then a corresponding ARMA transformation of y, and finally linear regression to find the magnitude. 
The parameter delta is optimized by exhaustive search over [0,1].  
For small impacts in noisy data, delta may end up on a sub-optimum. Try both the step and pulse 
options, and see what gives smallest standard error on the magnitude. Also, inspect the "delta 
optimization" data, where standard error of the estimate is plotted as a function of delta, to see if 
the optimized value may be unstable.  
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Excel
function will help users to freely convert Excel document to PDF, Tiff and Text search and select functionalities and manipulate help to find text contents on
how to make a pdf file text searchable; pdf find highlighted text
XDoc.Word for .NET, Support Processing Word document and Page in .
Able to view and edit Word rapidly. Convert. Convert Word to PDF. Convert Word to ODT. Text & Image Process. Search and find text in Word. Insert image to Word page
search pdf for text in multiple files; search pdf files for text programmatically
186 
The Box-Jenkins model can model changes that are abrupt and permanent (step function with 
delta=0, or pulse with delta=1), abrupt and non-permanent (pulse with delta<1), or gradual and 
permanent (step with delta<0).  
Be careful with the standard error on the magnitude - it will often be underestimated, especially if 
the ARMA model does not fit well. For this reason, a p value is deliberately not computed (Murtaugh 
2002). 
The example data set ;blue curveͿ is Sepkoski͛s curve for percent extinction rate on genus level since 
the Silurian, interpolated to even spacing at ca. 5.5 million years. The largest peak is the Permian-
Triassic boundary extinction. The user has specified an ARMA(2,0) model. The residual is plotted in 
red. The user has specified that the ARMA parameters should be computed for the points before the 
P-T extinction at time slot 34, and a pulse-type intervention. The analysis seems to indicate a large 
time constant (delta) for the intervention, with an effect lasting into the Jurassic. 
References 
Box, G.E.P. & G.C. Tiao. 1975. Intervention analysis with applications to economic and environental 
problems. Journal of the American Statistical Association 70:70-79. 
Melard, G. 1984. A fast algorithm for the exact likelihood of autoregressive-moving average models. 
Applied Statistics 33:104-114. 
Murtaugh, P.A. 2002. On rejection rates of paired intervention analysis. Ecology 83:1752-1761. 
187 
Insolation (solar forcing) model
This module computes solar insolation at any latitude and any time from 250 Ma to the Recent (the 
results are less accurate before 50 Ma). The calculation can be done for a "true" orbital longitude, 
"mean" orbital longitude (corresponding to a certain date in the year), averaged over a certain 
month in each year, or integrated over a whole year.  
The implementation in PAST is ported from the code by Laskar et al. (2004), by courtesy of these 
authors. Please reference Laskar et al. (2004) in any publications.  
It is necessary to specify a data file containing orbital parameters. Download the file 
INSOLN.LA2004.BTL.250.ASC from http://www.imcce.fr/Equipes/ASD/insola/earth/La2004 and put in 
anywhere on your computer. The first time you run the calculation, PAST will ask for the position of 
the file.  
The amount of data can become excessive for long time spans and short step sizes! 
Reference 
Laskar, J., P. Robutel, F. Joutel, M. Gastineau, A.C.M. Correia & B. Levrard. 2004. A long-term 
numerical solution for the insolation quantities of the Earth. Astronomy & Astrophysics 428:261-285. 
188 
Point events 
Expects one column containing times of events (e.g. earthquakes or  clade divergences) or positions 
along a line (e.g. a transect). The times do not have to be in increasing order. 
Density trend (Laplace test) 
The ͞Laplace͟ test for a trend in density (intensity) is described by Cox & Lewis (1978). It is based on 
the test statistic 
n
L
L
t
U
12
1
2
where 
t
is the mean event time, n the number of events and L the length of the interval. L is 
estimated as the time from the first to the last event, plus the mean waiting time. U is approximately 
normally distributed with zero mean and unit variance under the null hypothesis of constant 
intensity. This is the basis for the given p value. 
If p<0.05, a positive U indicates an increasing trend in intensity (decreasing waiting times), while a 
negative U indicates a decreasing trend. Note that if a trend is detected by this test, the sequence is 
not stationary and the assumptions of the exp test below are violated. 
Exp test for Poisson process 
The exp test (Prahl 1999) for a stationary Poisson process (random, independent events) is based on 
the set of n waiting times Δt
i
between successive events in the sorted sequence . The test statistic is: 
 
t T
i
i
T
t
n
M
1
1
189 
where T is the mean waiting time. M will tend to zero for a regularly spaced (overdispersed) 
sequence, and to 1 for a highly clustered sequence. For the null hypothesis of a Poisson process, M is 
asymptotically normally distributed with mean 1/e - 
/n and standard deviation β/n, where 
=0.189 and β=0.2427. This is the basis for the given z test. 
In summary, if p<0.05 the sequence is not Poisson. You can then inspect  the M statistic; if smaller 
than the expected value this indicates regularity, if higher it indicates clustering. 
For both tests, p values are also estimated by Monte Carlo simulation with 9999 random data sets. 
References 
Cox, D. R. & P. A. W. Lewis. 1978. The Statistical Analysis of Series of Events. Chapman and Hall, 
London. 
Prahl, J. 1999. A fast unbinned test on event clustering in Poisson processes. Arxiv, Astronomy and 
Astrophysics September 1999. 
190 
Markov chain
This module requires a single column containing a sequence of nominal data coded as integer 
numbers. For example, a stratigraphic sequence where 1 means limestone, 2 means shale and 3 
means sand. A transition matrix containing counts or proportions (probabilities) of state transitions is 
displayed. The ͞from͟-states are in rows, the ͞to͟-states in columns. 
It is also possible to specify several columns, each containing one or more state transitions (two 
numbers for one transition, n numbers for a sequence giving n-1 transitions).  
The chi-squared test reports the probability that the data were taken from a system with random 
proportions of transitions (i.e. no preferred transitions). The transitions with anomalous frequencies 
can be identified by comparing the observed and expected transition matrices. 
The ͞Embedded ;no repeatsͿ͟ option should be selected if the data have been collected in such a 
way that no transitions to the same state are possible (data points are only collected when there is a 
change). The transition matrix will then have zeroes on the diagonal. 
The algorithms, including an iterative algorithm for embedded Markov chains, are according to Davis 
(1986). 
Reference 
Davis, J.C. 1986. Statistics and Data Analysis in Geology. John Wiley & Sons.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested