how to upload pdf file in c# windows application : Search pdf documents for text software Library project winforms asp.net wpf UWP plecsmanual16-part661

Ideal Clutches
Inelastic Collisions
PLECS permits you to connect an ideal clutch between two bodies and engage
the clutch while they move (or rotate) at different speeds. PLECS models such
an event as a perfectly inelastic collision and calculates the common speed af-
ter the collision based on the conservation law of angular momentum so that
e.g.
!
+
=
J
1
!
1
+J
2
!
2
J
1
+J
2
where J
1
and J
2
are the moments of inertia of the two bodies, !
1
and !
2
are
the two angular speeds prior to the collision and !+ is the common angular
speed after the collision.
It is important to note that kinetic energy is lost during an inelastic colli-
sion even though the clutch is ideal and lossless. Assuming for simplicity that
J
1
=J
2
=J so that !
+
=
1
2
(!
1
+!
2
), the kinetic energy of the system before
and after the collision is for example
E
=
1
2
J
!
1
2
+!
2
2
E
+
=
1
2
(2J)!
+
2
=
1
4
J
!
1
+!
2
2
)
E
E
+
=
1
4
J
!
1
!
2
2
This is demonstrated using the simple example shown below consisting of two
bodies with the same inertia J = 1
kgm
2
rad2
.One initially rotates with !
1
=1
rad
s
while the other is stationary !
2
= 0. There is no friction or external torque
acting on the bodies. When the clutch engages at t = 1s, the two bodies imme-
diately rotate with the same speed !
+
=:5
rad
s
and the total kinetic energy of
the system reduces instantaneously from :5J to :25J.
It is interesting to compare this response with that of a more detailed model,
in which the clutch is modeled with a finite damping coefficient when en-
gaged. Additionally the two shafts connecting the bodies with the clutch are
139
Search pdf documents for text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; search pdf for text
Search pdf documents for text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to search text in pdf document; search a pdf file for text
6
Mechanical Modeling
0
0.5
1
−Speed / rad s
0
1
2
0
0.5
Mech. energy / J
t / s
Inelastic collision with ideal clutch
assumed to have a certain elasticity and damping coefficient. The correspond-
ing schematic and plots are shown below; for comparison the response from
the idealized model is superimposed with dashed lines.
The damping coefficients and spring constants have been exaggerated so that
there is visible swinging. Note however, that after the transients have settled,
the two bodies rotate at the same common speed as in the idealized model.
Likewise, the final mechanical energy stored in the system is the same as in
the idealized model.
140
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
For some important PDF documents, you may can select PDF text region, copy and paste PDF text for edit for C# .NET also supports to search PDF text, which help
search pdf files for text; how to select text in a pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
is designed to offer C# developers to compress existing PDF documents in .NET size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded search index.
how to search a pdf document for text; pdf make text searchable
Ideal Clutches
0
0.5
1
−Speed / rad s
0
1
2
0
0.5
Mech. energy / J
t / s
Inelastic collision with non-ideal clutch and elastic shafts
141
C# PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in C#.net, ASP.NET
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer. view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF.
pdf searchable text converter; select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF Print Library: Print PDF documents in vb.net, ASP.NET
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF.
convert pdf to searchable text online; pdf text search
6
Mechanical Modeling
142
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
C#.NET WinForms Viewer SDK provides C# WinForms Viewer, which is also an powerful documents and images Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview.
pdf text select tool; how to select text in pdf image
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Overview. RasterEdge C#.NET WPF Viewer SDK is an powerful documents and images viewer. Select PDF text on viewer. • Search PDF text in preview.
pdf text searchable; pdf search and replace text
7
Analysis Tools
Steady-State Analysis
Many specifications of a power electronic system are often given in terms of
steady-state characteristics. A straight-forward way to obtain the steady-state
operating point of a system is to simulate over a sufficiently long time-span
until all transients have faded out. The drawback of this brute-force approach
is that it can be very time consuming. Usually a system has time constants
that are much longer than the switching period. This applies in particular to
electro-thermal models.
Algorithm
The steady-state analysis of a periodic system is based on a quasi-Newton
method with Broyden’s update. In this approach the problem is formulated
as finding the roots of the function
f(x) = x F
T
(x)
where x is an initial vector of state variables and F
T
(x) is the final vector of
state variables one period T later.
Evaluating f(x) or F
T
(x) therefore involves running a simulation from t
start
to
t
start
+T. The period, T, must be the least common multiple of the periods of
all sources (signal or electrical) in the model.
The above problem can be solved iteratively using
x
k+1
=x
k
J
1
k
f(x
k
)
;
J
k
=
@f(x)
@x
x
k
The Jacobian J is calculated numerically using finite differences. If n is the
number of state variables, calculating the Jacobian requires n+ 1 simulation
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Guide and Sample Codes to Merge PDF Documents in VB.NET Project. Batch merge PDF documents in Visual Basic .NET class program.
how to make pdf text searchable; pdf searchable text
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
view, Annotate,Convert documents online using ASPX. edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF, C#.NET
find and replace text in pdf; select text pdf file
7
Analysis Tools
runs where each state variable in turn is slightly perturbed and the difference
between the perturbed and unperturbed solution is computed to obtain one
column of J:
j
i
=
f(x+x
i
) f(x)
jx
i
j
;
i= 1:::n
Because this is computationally expensive, only the first Jacobian is actually
computed this way. In subsequent iterations, the Jacobian is updated using
Broyden’s method, which does not require any additional simulations.
The convergence criterion of the iterations is based on the requirement that
both the maximum relative error in the state variables and the maximum rel-
ative change from one iteration to the next are smaller than a certain limit
rtol:
x
k+1
x
k
x
k
<rtol
and
jf
i
(x)j
maxjx
i
()j
<rtol for all i = 1;:::;n
Asteady-state analysis comprises the following steps:
1 Simulate until the final switch positions after one cycle are equal to the ini-
tial switch positions. This is called a circular topology.
2 Calculate the Jacobian matrix J
0
for the initial state.
3 Iterate until the convergence criterion is satisfied. If during the iterations
the final switch positions after one cycle differ from the initial switch posi-
tions, go back to step 1.
Fast Jacobian Calculation for Thermal States
To reduce the number of simulation runs and thus save computation time
PLECS can calculate the Jacobian matrix entries pertaining to thermal states
directly from the state-space matrices rather than using finite differences.
There is a certain error involved with this method since it neglects the feed-
back from the thermal states to the electrical states (or Simulink states).
While this will not affect the accuracy of the final result of the steady-state
analysis it may slow down the convergence. Normally, however, the overall
performance will be much faster than calculating the full Jacobian matrix.
The calculation method is controlled by the parameter
JacobianCalculation
(see below).
144
Steady-State Analysis
Non-periodic Case
If the operating point of the system is defined as non-periodic (DC), a variant
of the algorithm described above is performed. As in the periodic case, Newton
iterations are executed to find the steady-state. Here, the algorithm searches
for the roots of the function
f(x) = _x
i.e. the time derivative of the vector of state variables x. Since no simulation
has to be performed to compute f, the full Jacobian J is calculated in each it-
eration. The convergence criterion remains the same as for the periodic case.
Limitations
Hidden state variables
In the PLECS Blockset, the steady-state analysis depends on the fact that a
model can be completely initialized with the
InitialState
parameter of the
sim
command. However, certain Simulink blocks that clearly have an inter-
nal memory do not store this memory in the state vector and therefore can-
not be initialized. Among these blocks are the Memory block, the Relay block,
the Transport Delay block and the Variable Transport Delay block. If a model
contains any block with hidden states, the algorithm may be unable to find a
solution.
State variable windup
If the effect of a state variable on the system is limited in some way but the
state variable itself is not limited, it might wind up towards infinity. In this
case the algorithm may fail to converge or return a false solution. In order to
avoid this problem you should limit the state variable itself, e.g. by enabling
the Limit output checkbox of an Integrator block.
Reference
D. Maksimovi´c, "Automated steady-state analysis of switching power convert-
ers using a general-purpose simulation tool", Proc. IEEE Power Electron-
ics Specialists Conference, June 1997, pp. 1352-1358.
145
7
Analysis Tools
AC Analysis
The AC Analysis uses the Steady-State Analysis to compute the transfer func-
tion of a periodic system at discrete analysis frequencies. For each frequency
the following steps are executed:
1 Apply a sinusoidal perturbation to the system under study.
2 Find the periodic steady-state operating point of the perturbed system.
3 Extract the system response at the perturbation frequency using Fourier
analysis.
The perturbation frequencies are defined by specifying the sweep range and
the number of points to be placed within this range on a linear or logarithmic
scale.
Note The period length of the perturbed system is the least common multiple
of the unperturbed system period and the perturbationperiod. Inorder to keep
this number and thus the simulation time small the algorithm may slightly ad-
just the individual perturbation frequencies.
In PLECS Standalone, the operating point can be defined as “non-periodic”
(DC). In this case, no sweep is executed, but the Bode plot is computed di-
rectly from the state space matrices at the steady-state.
Impulse Response Analysis
An alternative and faster method to determine the open loop transfer function
of a system is the Impulse Response Analysis. Instead of perturbing a system
with sinusoidal stimuli of different frequencies, one at a time, a single impulse
is applied when the system is in steady state. The system transfer function
can then be calculated very efficiently over a wide frequency range (from zero
to half the system frequency) by computing the Laplace transform of the tran-
sient impulse response.
Algorithm
The impulse response analysis is performed in three steps:
146
Impulse Response Analysis
1 Find the steady-state operating point of the system under study.
2 Apply a perturbation in form of a discrete impulse for the duration of one
period.
3 Calculate the Laplace transform of the transient impulse response.
Compensation for Discrete Pulse
Theoretically, in order to compute the system transfer function from the
Laplace transform of the system response, the system must be perturbed with
aunit Dirac impulse (also known as delta function). This is not practical for
numerical analysis, so the algorithm applies a finite rectangular pulse instead.
For transfer functions such as the line-to-output transfer function or the out-
put impedance this can be compensated for by dividing the Laplace transform
of the system response by the Laplace transform of the rectangular pulse.
This is achieved by setting the parameter Compensationfor discrete pulse
to
discrete pulse
,which is the default.
However, when calculating control-to-output transfer functions that involve
the duty cycle of a switched converter, the rectangular input signal interferes
with the sampling of the modulator. In this case the compensation type should
be set to
external reference
.This causes the Impulse Response Analysis
block to have two input signals that should be connected as shown in this fig-
ure.
m
15/28
Scope
Modulator
PWM
[m_ac]
[m_ac]
Control to Output
Transfer Function
PLECS
Impulse Resp.
Analysis
Circuit
s
i_L
v_load
PLECS
Circuit
Finally, you can set the compensation type to
none
which means that the com-
puted transfer function is taken as is. Use this setting if the modulator uses
regular sampling and the sampling period is identical to the system period.
Reference
D. Maksimovi´c, "Automated small-signal analysis of switching power convert-
ers using a general-purpose time-domain simulator", Proc. Applied Power
147
7
Analysis Tools
Electronics Conference, February 1998.
Multitone Analysis
The Multitone Analysis is similar to an AC Analysis. Again the response of
the system to a small perturbation signal is analysed. However, instead of
multiple sinusoidal signals of different frequencies, only one multitone signal
is applied. It is composed of several sinusoidal signals and therefore contains
all investigated frequencies at once.
The multitone signal is computed as
u(t) =
r
2
N
XN
k=1
sin
2kf
b
t+
(k   1)
2
N
;
(7.1)
where N is the number of tones and f
b
the base frequency. In PLECS, the
user can control the amplitude of the perturbation signal by a factor that is
multiplied to u(t).
Algorithm
The simulation is divided into two phases. It is assumed that the system
reaches its steady-state in the first phase of duration T
i
.In the second phase
of duration T
b
= 1=f
b
,the response of the system is recorded for the Fourier
analysis.
The Multitone Analysis performs these steps:
1 Perform an unperturbed simulation of length T
i
+T
b
.Record the system
response during T
b
in y
0
.
2 Perform a simulation of the same length and perturbed by u. Record the
system response during T
b
in y.
3 Compute the Fourier transforms U of u and Y of y  y
0
.
4 Compute the transfer function as G = Y=U.
148
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested