how to upload pdf file in c# windows application : Cannot select text in pdf software SDK cloud windows wpf html class pnw_gtr7461-part728

Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
7
Recommendations here are based on a log sampling study conducted in 
mixed-conifer forests within the Columbia River basin (CRB) region, specifically 
Oregon and Montana (Bate and others 2004). This study investigated the accuracy, 
precision, and efficiency of the LIM and SPM for sampling log resources important 
to wildlife.
Methods
Sampling Objectives (Step 1)
Most ecological studies are designed to answer some form of the question: How 
many are there? For example, do silvicultural practices comply with management 
guidelines for log density? Or, what is the difference in log cover in areas used 
for lynx dens compared to areas that are not? Accordingly, the first step in any 
sampling program is to specify the sampling objective(s). User’s objectives 
ultimately determine the amount of time and resources needed to obtain estimates 
with a desired level of precision. Objectives can be clarified by answering the 
following questions:
1.  What log sizes (diameter and length) are of interest? 
2.  Which variables are of interest—density, total length, percentage cover, 
volume, or weight? 
3.  Will data be used to check compliance with management guidelines, to es-
tablish baseline data for monitoring, or to assess habitat for a threatened or 
endangered species? This answer often dictates the answers to the follow-
ing questions.
4.  How precise do users need their estimate? 
5.  Is log species important? If so, why?
6.  Are data on wildlife use of logs important (for example, woodpecker for-
aging, squirrel middens)? 
As Krebs (1989) stated, “Not everything that can be measured should be.” 
Time spent on extraneous data collection limits the number of samples and the 
subsequent results. For example, identifying each log by species seems simple. Yet, 
species identification can often substantially increase the amount of survey time, 
especially for inexperienced field crew members. Therefore, users should specify 
their objectives and how data will be used before starting log surveys. 
As a general guideline for acceptable precision, we recommend sampling 
sufficient to estimate parameters within 20 percent of the true mean, 90 percent of 
the time. These values are set as defaults in SnagPRO. We have observed that when 
logs are relatively rare and have clumped distributions, the required sample sizes to 
Cannot select text in pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf text select tool; find text in pdf files
Cannot select text in pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search a pdf file for text; select text in pdf reader
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
8
gain a higher level of precision (for example, within 10 percent of the true mean, 95 
percent of the time) often are cost and area prohibitive. Only when logs are abun-
dant and randomly distributed would higher precision be manageable.
Landscape Definition and Selection (Step 2)
The second step is to define the landscape by delineating the boundaries of the 
sampling area. Our methods were designed to be compatible with the snag and 
large tree sampling methods developed by Bate and others (1999a, in press). Meth-
ods for sampling snags and large trees were initially developed on landscapes of 
1200 to 2800 ha (3,000 to 6,900 ac) (Bull and others 1991). Log sampling methods 
can also be used on a subwatershed scale with a few modifications. See “Establish-
ing Transects” and “Compare to Target” sections for details. 
Subwatersheds in the CRB range from about 160 to 8100 ha (400 to 20,000 ac) 
(Quigley and others 1996). The sampling area for logs, however, need not be a sub-
watershed or other large landscape. Our methods may also be used for individual 
stands (<40 ha or 100 ac), or a group of stands, given that the log size of interest is 
relatively abundant. If the logs of interest are relatively rare (e.g., <100 to 150/ha) in 
small stands used as sample units, a complete count may be more appropriate. 
Landscape Stratification (Step 3)
Perhaps the most important step is the stratification process. Although the initial 
investment of time may seem large, appropriate stratification will ultimately reduce 
sampling effort and increase precision (Krebs 1989). Stratification often can be 
based on strata established for prior silvicultural or inventory work. For example, 
many foresters stratify the landscape to conduct stand exams, and their delinea-
tions may work well for sampling logs. If log sampling occurs with snag sampling, 
stratification based on snag abundance is more appropriate. Obtaining precise 
estimates of snag conditions often is more difficult than for logs, owing to the lower 
abundance of snags and higher variability of estimates. 
The need to stratify the landscape as part of sampling depends on several 
factors (Cochran 1977):
•  Stratification may increase precision of estimates. If, for example, the 
landscape has distinct areas of high versus low log abundance, estab-
lishing corresponding strata of high or low abundance can substantially 
improve precision and reduce the sampling effort required to obtain the 
desired precision. 
Although the 
initial investment 
of time may seem 
large, appropriate 
stratification will 
ultimately reduce 
sampling effort and 
increase precision.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Or you can select x86 if you use x86 dlls. (The application cannot to work without this node.).
pdf searchable text; how to make pdf text searchable
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. When you select x64 and directly run the application, you may get following error. (The application cannot to work without
pdf text search; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
9
•  Sampling problems can differ spatially according to forest community 
type, timber harvest method, or seral stage, and stratification of these con-
ditions can often increase precision.
•  Resource specialists may want to obtain separate estimates for 
management-based subdivisions of the landscape. For example, part of 
a subwatershed may be managed for timber production and another part 
may be managed as a research natural area.
If one or more of the above criteria applies to the situation, it would probably be 
beneficial to stratify. SnagPRO can accommodate up to four strata. If the landscape 
is homogeneous throughout in regard to log abundance and forest structure, there is 
probably little to be gained by stratifying.
Stratify
the
Survey
Area
Use the following steps to stratify the survey area:
1.  Visit the area first, as landscape patterns become apparent from an initial 
ground survey. Ask, “What differences and similarities in log abundance 
and vegetative structure are evident across the landscape?” 
2.  Obtain reference maps for field use, such as geographic information sys-
tem (GIS) maps, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) orthoquad maps, or both. 
Request metadata (data definitions) for maps and data. Maps should dis-
play the following necessary information:
a.  Road system with road type and maintenance level. 
b.  Stand or vegetation units and their respective unique numeric identifiers.
c.  Current seral stage of vegetation at 1:31,680, or less. 
3.  Query databases to obtain the following information about each stand: for-
est type (low versus high elevation, dry versus moist), management activi-
ties, seral stage, disturbance history (wind, fire, insects, and disease) and 
any other factors that may affect log abundance. Make sure the data report 
includes types of management activities, such as harvest method used, 
slash and burn prescriptions, thinning, and management direction for  
log retention.
4.  Check the map and stand data using aerial photographs. Generally, the 
amount of time spent stratifying the stands in the field is inversely propor-
tional to the quality of the original stand data collected or the quality of 
the data query. Review the metadata before heading to the field.
5.  Revisit the survey area with the field maps. Plan to spend at least one day 
to validate the information on the map(s) and data report. 
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Choose Items", and browse to locate and select "RasterEdge.Imaging open a file dialog and load your PDF document in will be a pop-up window "cannot open your
pdf make text searchable; cannot select text in pdf
C# Image: How to Deploy .NET Imaging SDK in Visual C# Applications
RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll; in C# Application. Q: Error: Cannot find RasterEdge Right click on projects, and select properties.
pdf find text; how to search a pdf document for text
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
10
6.  Assign each stand to a stratum. Estimate the number of hectares (acres) 
within each stand or stratum.
Most landscapes targeted for log sampling have undergone some timber 
harvest. Consequently, depending on the method of harvest, the placement of each 
stand within a stratum may or may not be straightforward. For example, most 
unharvested mature/old-growth stands in mixed-conifer forests have an abundance 
of logs. By contrast, older harvest units that had been clearcut and broadcast 
burned may have few logs. Finally, more recent clearcuts may have logs uniformly 
distributed, reflecting policy changes.
For old growth or clearcut harvest situations, combine all unharvested ma-
ture/old-growth stands into a single stratum. Then consult silviculturists, query 
databases, and conduct a ground check to determine when log retention began in 
harvest units. Place older clearcut stands that had no management guidelines for 
logs in one stratum, and more recent clearcut areas in another stratum. Generate 
a new map of all stands categorized as one of three strata: (1) recent clearcut, (2) 
older clearcut, and (3) unharvested mature/old growth. 
Establishing the strata is more time-consuming for areas of selection harvest, 
especially if GIS stand data are unavailable. In this situation, visit individual 
stands to examine log abundance and stratify accordingly. Furthermore, unlike the 
stratification process for snags or large trees, which often can be done quickly by 
viewing small portions of the stand’s edge (Bate and others 1999a), the stratifica-
tion process for logs typically requires more thorough stand reconnaissance. This 
is because fuelwood gathering, wind effects, diseases, and insects can dramati-
cally alter the patterns of log abundance along the edge of a stand compared to the 
interior. Furthermore, both grass and shrub cover near stand edges can obscure 
smaller logs from sight.
The manner in which a watershed or other landscape is stratified is dictated by 
the sampling objectives. How does the log size of interest vary in abundance across 
the sampling area? If the main objective is to obtain density estimates of large 
(>25 cm [10 in] large-end diameter [LED]) logs, stratification is dictated solely by 
this LED size class. Stands with high densities should be placed together in one 
stratum; stands with low densities should be placed in another. If precise estimates 
of both small and large logs are desired, such as for log sampling to assess fuel 
loadings (smaller logs) and wildlife habitat (larger logs), stratification should be 
based on whether small or large size classes of logs are more variable. If snags and 
trees also are sampled, stratification should be based on the component for which it 
is considered most difficult to obtain a precise estimate. Usually, this is snags.
GIF to PNG Converter | Convert GIF to PNG, Convert PNG to GIF
Imaging SDK; Save the converted list in memory if you cannot convert at Select "Convert to PNG"; Select "Start" to start conversion procedure; Select "Save" to
search text in pdf using java; how to search text in pdf document
C# PowerPoint: Document Viewer Creating in Windows Forms Project
You can select a PowerPoint file to be loaded into the WinViewer control. is not supported by WinViewer control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your
converting pdf to searchable text format; can't select text in pdf file
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
11
Another criterion for landscape stratification is seral stage or method of past 
timber harvest, which may affect the level of difficulty in conducting the survey. 
Dense shrub or seedling/sapling densities can make it difficult to sample accurately 
with the SPM for variables other than log density. 
Finally, stratification of landscapes often is dictated by differences in land 
management use. If separate estimates are needed for areas that are managed for 
different purposes (for example, riparian areas versus high-production timber 
areas), stratification based on these different land allocations is needed. 
Stand stratification—
Stands, by definition, are homogeneous units and usually should not require strati-
fication. An exception may be large mature or old-growth stands surrounded by 
stand-regenerating harvests. Trees along the edges of these older stands are more 
susceptible to blowdown, creating well-defined borders of high log abundance in 
contrast to interior parts of the stand. In this case, the edge should be treated as 
its own stratum. Otherwise, the variance within the stand may be so great that it 
becomes difficult to obtain a precise estimate. 
Choosing the Appropriate Sampling Method: LIM, SPM,  
or Both (Step 4)
The log characteristics to be sampled affect the choice of sampling method. Density 
is the number of logs per hectare or acre. Total log length is the combined length of 
logs per unit area (either m/ha or ft/ac). Cover is the percentage of ground covered 
by logs. This can be calculated by treating each log as a trapezoid and determin-
ing what percentage of the ground is covered with these trapezoid-shaped areas. 
Volume of logs is cubic meters of logs per hectare or cubic feet per acre. Weight is 
the metric tons of logs per hectare or tons per acre. 
The LIM is based on probability sampling (De Vries 1973). To obtain estimates 
of each variable, specific measurements of intersected logs (diameter and/or length) 
are taken (fig. 1a). These measurements are then inserted into equations unique 
to each variable to obtain estimates (De Vries 1973). Only logs whose central 
axis is intersected by a transect line are measured (Brown 1974). Approximately 
100 intersections are needed to obtain a reasonably precise estimate of weight or 
volume within a given area (Brown, J.K. 1998. Personal communication. Retired 
research forester, USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station). Table 
1 describes the log measurements and data required for estimates of each variable 
using LIM. See formulas in the “Computer Analysis” section for each equation. 
By contrast, the SPM is a type of area-plot sampling. “Strip plot” refers to plots 
that are long and narrow rectangles (Husch and others 1972). Estimates using SPM 
The log 
characteristics 
to be sampled 
affect the choice 
of sampling 
method.
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected text or graphical annotations. You can select a file to be loaded into the there will prompt a window "cannot open your
pdf text search tool; how to select all text in pdf
C# Image: How to Use C# Code to Capture Document from Scanning
installed on the client as browsers cannot interface directly a multi-page document (including PDF, TIFF, Word Select Fill from the Dock property located in
search text in multiple pdf; how to make a pdf document text searchable
Figure 1—Field measurements necessary to obtain estimates of all log parameters using the LIM (A) 
and SPM (B). In addition, the condition of each log (sound or rotten) is required to estimate weight.
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
12
are obtained by first taking the necessary log measurements within the area of a 
strip plot (fig.1b and table 1), and then converting this to hectares or acres. For our 
methods, the default area for a metric strip plot is 50 m
2
(4 m wide by 12.5 m long), 
centered on a transect line (fig. 1b). For English units, the default area is 600 ft
2
(12 ft wide by 50 ft long), centered on a transect line. Table 1 contains the required 
information about each log for estimates of each variable when using SPM. See 
formulas in the “Computer Analysis” section for each equation.
Outer strip-plot boundaries are determined by using a meter- or 3-ft caliper 
(fig. 2a and 2b) or a customized measuring stick (see appendix 1 for details), which 
functions as a square. The rectangular shape of the strip plot was selected because 
rectangles, in contrast to other plot shapes, reduce the sampling variance of logs 
and other forest structures that often are distributed in clumps (Krebs 1989,  
Warren and Olsen 1964). A 4-m or 12-ft width was used because this width 
C# Word: How to Create C# Word Windows Viewer with .NET DLLs
and browse to find and select RasterEdge.XDoc control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
pdf search and replace text; search pdf documents for text
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Items", and browse to find & select WinViewer DLL; there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to select text in a pdf; find and replace text in pdf
Figure 2—Calipers function 
as a square when using strip-
plot method (A). Two lengths 
of the calipers denote the 
outer boundaries of the plot 
and the place to where the 
length is measured and the 
large (or small) diameter is 
taken (B). 
A
B
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
13
typically is sufficient to sample logs, and is narrow enough to avoid the need  
for laying out additional plot boundary lines (Bate and others 2004). 
The first consideration in choosing a sampling method is the log variables  
of interest. Table 2 provides general guidelines for the decisionmaking process.  
For example, if only log density is of interest, the choice is easy: use SPM. It is 
more precise and takes less than half the time to implement in the field (Bate  
and others 2004). If variables other than density are desired, then other factors 
become important.
Second, consider the density of logs present. During the stratification process, 
an ocular assessment of log density by size class is first done as part of initial site 
visits. If logs appear to be relatively rare, use SPM. If the logs are so numerous as 
to be arranged in jackstraw piles and density is not a variable of interest, LIM is 
preferable. See table 2 for general guidelines.
Third, consider the stand characteristics. Has timber harvest occurred? In 
unharvested stands, the lengths and diameters of logs intersected when using LIM 
tend to be normally distributed, with midlength and middiameter logs being the 
most common logs (Bate and others 2004). In these situations, LIM yields precise 
and accurate estimates. In some types of harvested stands, however, most logs tend 
to be short and small in diameter, with few logs present that are long and large in 
Table 1–Field measurements required to obtain estimates 
of five log variables by using the line-intersect (LIM) or 
strip-plot (SPM) method
a
Field measurement required
Variable
LIM
SPM
Density
Log length
Endpoint (LED) in or out?
Total length
Number of log  
intersections
Length of log within strip  
plot
Percent cover Diameter at 
intersection
Length, small- and large-end  
diameters within strip plot
Volume
Diameter at  
intersection
Length, small- and large-end  
diameters within strip plot
Weight
Diameter at  
intersection  
and condition
Length, small- and large-end  
diameters within strip plot,  
and condition
For analysis by size class, the large-end diameter (LED) also needs 
to be recorded for all variables.
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
14
diameter. In this latter situation, it may be difficult to obtain precise estimates with 
LIM because of the high variance in log characteristics. Consequently, SPM  
is likely a better choice.
Fourth, consider the landscape conditions. How easy or difficult would it be 
to travel from one point to another to establish sampling transects? The process 
of locating and establishing sampling transects takes substantially more time than 
sampling. This is especially true for landscape analyses. Establishment of transects 
using SPM takes about one to four times as much time as actual sampling. For LIM, 
Table 2–Dichotomous key for selecting initial sampling method within a stratum 
based on log variables desired
1
Density is the only desired variable; log abundance low to high; unharvested or  
harvested stands ................................................................................................................SPM
1
Percentage cover, volume, weight, total length of logs; unharvested or harvested stands  2*
1
All variables; unharvested or harvested stands  ..................................................................3*
2
Log abundance High; >11 logs intersected per 100 m of transect  .................................. LIM
2
Log abundance Moderate; 6-11 logs intersected per 100 m  ..................................................4
2
Log abundance Low; <6 logs intersected per 100 m  ......................................................SPM
3
Log abundance High; >11 logs intersected per 100 m of transect  .........LIM and SPM Tally
3
Log abundance Moderate; 6-11 logs intersect per 100 m ......................................................5
3
Log abundance Low; <6 logs intersected per 100 m  ......................................................SPM
4
Stands or landscapes with relatively light ground cover in the form of shrubs or  
young trees; sampling or travel not likely to be impeded by such ground cover  ...........SPM
4
Stands or landscapes with ground cover dominated by shrubs or young trees  
that will likely impede sampling or travel  ....................................................................... LIM
5
Stands or landscapes with relatively light ground cover in the form of shrubs or  
young trees; sampling or travel not likely to be impeded by such ground cover .............SPM
5
Stands or landscapes with ground cover dominated by shrubs or young trees  
that will likely impede sampling or travel ................................................... LIM and SPM Tally
Users should be aware that in harvested stands composed of mainly short log lengths and small 
diameters with only a few large logs, the SPM may be a better choice for sampling owing to the high 
variance associated with LIM sampling in these conditions.
Figure 3—When the line-intersect method 
is used, diameters of qualifying logs are 
measured where the transect line intersects 
the central axis of the log.
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
15
establishment takes about three to six times as long. Although it generally takes 
less time per unit transect sampled with LIM (obtaining density estimates being the 
only exception), less information is also collected per unit transect. This translates 
into larger sample size requirements to obtain desired precision (Bate and others 
2004). Therefore, if a large amount of time is anticipated to locate and establish 
transects, owing to steep terrain or limited access, SPM is the better choice, given 
that sampling conditions are not hampered by a high abundance of logs or  
shrub cover. 
High shrub cover causes difficult traveling and sampling condi-
tions. In areas where shrubs are so dense that taking measurements of 
log lengths within the strip-plot boundaries is difficult, LIM is likely 
a better choice. This is true unless log abundance is too low to obtain 
a reasonably precise estimate with the LIM or log density is the only 
variable of interest.
Users are not limited to using SPM or LIM exclusively. There may 
be cases when doing so results in an unnecessary amount of field effort. 
For example, in areas of high log abundance with multiple variables 
of interest, it may be beneficial to use a combination of SPM and LIM 
(see example I in the “Tutorial” section for details). Use the LIM to estimate total 
log length, percentage cover, volume, and weight (figs. 3 and 4). Use the SPM to 
estimate log density from a tally of endpoints of logs within 2 m of the transect 
line used for LIM (fig. 4). The advantage with this approach is that field observers 
need not leave the centerline to make measurements in difficult field conditions. 
The disadvantage is that field assistants need to be trained to sample logs using two 
methods. 
The other situation where a combination of the two methods is beneficial is on 
a landscape that needs to be stratified because of high variability in log density. 
For example, if density in one area is extremely high, making travel and sampling 
difficult, LIM is the better method for estimating log volume. In areas that have 
undergone timber harvest and have low log density, SPM is a better choice. Then, 
using a special section called Combo within SnagPRO, a stratified estimate of log 
volume can be obtained. The only unique aspect of this file is that all parameter 
estimates need to be converted to acres or hectares before this utility is used. See 
Example 3 in the “Tutorial” section for details.
Classifying logs by size (LED)—
Just as snags and trees are categorized by their diameter at breast height (d.b.h.), 
logs are best categorized by their LED. For logs with rootwads intact, the LED is 
equivalent to the d.b.h. if the tree had remained standing (fig. 5). For logs with no 
Just as snags 
and trees are 
categorized by their 
diameter at breast 
height (d.b.h.), logs 
are best categorized 
by their LED.
Figure 4—Combination of log sampling techniques: Line-intersect 
method (LIM) and strip-plot method (SPM) tally. Two logs qualify for 
the LIM because their central axes are intersected by the central tran-
sect line. Three logs qualify for the the SPM tally because their LEDs 
lie within 2 m of the central transect line.
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
16
rootwad attached, the LED is the diameter 
at the largest end of the log that is complete 
(fig. 5). 
Large-end diameters define a log 
population and allow for accurate temporal 
and spatial comparisons of logs among 
size classes. In the past, most log sampling 
techniques required data only on the 
diameter of a log at the point of intersection. 
This greatly limited the value of the data for 
wildlife specialists, because often only the 
larger logs are of interest. For example, two 
stands may have the same volume of logs. 
What cannot be determined, unless LED 
is recorded, is whether logs are small and 
numerous or large and uncommon. Further-
more, setting a high minimum diameter for 
logs to be included during line-intercept 
sampling can lead to a negative bias in the 
variable estimate (L. Bate, unpublished 
data). For example, if only logs are sampled 
whose diameter at intersection is >25 cm 
(10 in), log volume will be underestimated. 
How much the log volume will be under-
estimated cannot be determined; it is a 
function of the log sizes present. 
Categorical versus continuous data
Logs can be classified by their LEDs 
either categorically or continuously. There 
are advantages and disadvantages to both approaches. For research purposes, 
continuous data are probably best. Continuous data can be used to evaluate, for 
example, the relation between wildlife abundance and increasing log size. The 
advantage is that queries can then be run encompassing all logs or just certain size 
classes of logs, and thresholds, if any, may be detected. The disadvantage is that 
collecting continuous data takes more field time because the LED of all logs must 
be measured. 
The alternative is to collect data categorically. The advantage is that the 
sampling is greatly simplified and saves time. For example, if only two size 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested