how to upload pdf file in database using asp.net c# : How to select text in pdf reader SDK application service wpf html web page dnn pnw_gtr7464-part731

Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
37
Required calculates how many additional meters or feet of transect are required 
given that some samples have already been taken. The final column on the Optimal 
page provides users with the parameter estimate in English units if the data are in 
metric, and in metric units if the data are English.
Analysis for independence—
The sampling protocols presented here suggest sampling along 100-m or 400-ft-
long transects divided into smaller increments so that the optimal transect length 
may be determined. Sampling units were assumed to be independent (Hurlbert 
1984, Krebs 1989, Swihart and Slade 1985) for equations in this report; therefore 
the length of transect chosen as optimal should also be tested to ensure that the 
density (or cover, length, volume, or weight) of logs on one increment of a transect 
are not predicted by the density of logs in the previous increment. If they are, 
sampling units would be serially correlated, and this would violate the assumption 
of independence. 
SnagPRO tests for a serial correlation between increments of similar length 
along transects. Users will find this function on the Summarize Statistics page. 
Follow these steps: 
1.  Fill in the Qualify column with the appropriate formula.
2.  Click Calculate Statistics for the stratum of interest.
3.  Click Correlation on the Summarize Statistics page.
4.  Enter the name of the transect length increment to test for serial 
correlation. 
Results of the test provide a Pearson’s correlation coefficient and the coefficient 
of determination. The correlation coefficient (r) estimates the association between 
two variables (Sokal and Rohlf 1981). The coefficient of determination (r
2
) is the 
correlation coefficient squared. It estimates the dependence of one variable upon 
another. Using density as an example, the r
2
value explains how much the density in 
one increment is predicted by the previous increment.
The range for correlation coefficients is -1 < r < +1 (Sokal and Rohlf 1981). 
High correlation coefficients suggest that adjacent length increments along the same 
transect (for example, subsegments, segments, or sections) are correlated with each 
other and cannot be considered independent sampling units. As a general guideline, 
correlation coefficients less than 0.45 (r
2
<0.2) suggest that adjacent increments are 
independent and the increment selected can be used as the sampling unit. Values 
higher than this suggest adjacent increments are correlated and sampling should 
continue, with the optimal transect length indicated through initial analyses of pilot 
data or by choosing a different transect length that appears to be independent. 
How to select text in pdf reader - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf find and replace text; search pdf for text in multiple files
How to select text in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search pdf files for text; how to select text in pdf image
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
38
For example, if segments are shown to be the optimal transect length within a 
stratum, but these segments are serially correlated with each other, there are two 
choices. First, drop the suggested sampling protocol along 100-m or 400-ft tran-
sects, and continue sampling only with segment lengths. In this situation, continue 
with the standardized numbering of transects and subsegments, but only sample a 
segment length (25 m or 100 ft) along each transect. Second, test for independence 
of subsegment or section lengths. If either of these lengths are independent, use one 
of these lengths (nested within the 100-m-long transect) for sampling.
Parameter Estimates for a Nonstratified Landscape—
To obtain estimates of a variable and its precision for a nonstratified stand or 
landscape, users should click the tab with the variable name they are calculating 
(Density, Percent Cover, Total Length, Volume, or Weight) and then on the 
Simple-Random Sampling Equation tab.
Clicking on the Single button activates the simple-random sampling equa-
tions. Users of SPM will be prompted to enter the size of their stand or landscape 
(hectares or acres) in the Landscape Area box before filling in the page. The size 
of the stand or landscape is necessary for area plot sampling so that a finite popula-
tion correction factor (Krebs 1989) can be applied in cases where the area sampled 
represents a large proportion of the entire landscape. 
When the Single button is clicked, SnagPRO automatically fills in the needed 
cells from the Optimal page using information from the transect length increment 
that minimized sampling effort. The variable estimate, its standard error, bound, 
upper and lower limits, and the current level of precision are all given below.
Users may also override the optimal transect length and choose the transect 
length they want to evaluate. This would be done if, for example, results from 
subsegments were serially correlated, but segments were not. In this example  
users would: 
1.  From the Settings menu, select Optimal Selection.
2.  Click on Single stratum.
3.  Select Segments.
4.  Click on the Single button on the variable page again. 
To change back, just choose Auto from the selection menu and re-click the 
Single button. 
Users may also 
override the optimal 
transect length and 
choose the transect 
length they want 
to evaluate. This 
would be done if, 
for example, results 
from subsegments 
were serially 
correlated, but 
segments were not.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
find text in pdf image; how to select text in pdf and copy
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
search text in pdf using java; pdf make text searchable
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
39
Parameter estimates for a stratified landscape—
To obtain estimates for a stratified stand or landscape, click the tab with the name 
of the desired variable. Activate the Stratified Random Sampling Equation page 
by clicking on the tab with this name. For LIM analyses, click on the tab labeled 
Stratified to have information transferred to this sheet. For SPM analyses, enter the 
area of each stratum before clicking the Stratified button. Then SnagPRO auto-
matically fills in the necessary cells from the Optimal page using information from 
the transect length that minimized sampling effort for each stratum. The variable 
estimate, its standard error, bound, upper and lower limits, and the current level of 
precision are all provided. 
As with a single stratum, users may also override the optimal transect length 
for each stratum following the directions above. This may occur when transects 
are chosen as the optimal length within a certain stratum, but results in a substan-
tial length of transect required within that stratum. If more sampling is required, 
examine sample size requirements for various transect lengths before deciding on  
a length. 
Sample size determination—
The estimated sample size for nonstratified landscapes or stands is given on the 
Optimal page under Estimated Sample Size Required (n) and is converted to meters 
or feet in the next column. 
For stratified subwatersheds, go to the Sample Size page. SnagPRO provides 
both the proportional allocation and optimal method for sample size estimates, 
breaking it down into transect lengths for each stratum. 
Proportional Allocation of the sample size allocates the samples among the 
strata based on the proportion of the total area in each stratum (weight W
 
). By 
contrast, Optimal Allocation incorporates both the stratum proportional area (W
 
and variance (s
2
 
) to determine how many samples are required within each stratum 
(Krebs 1989). Both methods calculate the number of samples required to obtain a 
parameter estimate that is within 20 percent of the true mean 90 percent of  
the time. 
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. NET class without adobe reader installed. Provide
how to search pdf files for text; pdf searchable text converter
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
pdf find highlighted text; text searchable pdf
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
40
The sample size (Krebs 1989) required by the proportional allocation method is 
determined by the equation:
B
2
t
α
W
S
i
 
n =
2
[10]
where
n =   total sample size required in stratified sampling,
B =  desired bound for 1 - α, we have substituted the symbol B (to denote 
bound) for the d listed in Krebs (1989) equations,
t
α
 student’s t value for 90-percent confidence limits (1 - α),
W
 stratum weight (A
/A),
s
i
2
 variance in stratum i,
A =  total number of hectares in landscape, and
A
i
 number of hectares in stratum i.
The number of samples within each stratum (n
 
) is determined by multiplying 
the total number of samples needed (n) by the weight (W
 
) of each stratum. 
n
i
=
nW
i
[11]
Sample size for the optimal allocation method (Krebs 1989) is found by the 
following equation:
+
  
W
i 
s
t
a              
A
B  
2           
1
 
W
s
i
n =
2
2
[12]
where
s
i
 standard deviation in stratum i.
The number of samples needed within each stratum is estimated by: 
A
i
s
i
A
s
i
n
i
= n
[13]
Each of the allocation methods has its advantages and disadvantages. The 
proportional allocation method offers the advantage of dropping the stratification 
and combining all samples after the sampling is done, such as when users find little 
or no difference in parameter estimates across strata. This yields a larger sample 
size (n) and a smaller variance. This option is not available if the optimal allocation 
method is used.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
how to select text on pdf; pdf select text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
search pdf files for text programmatically; how to select all text in pdf file
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
41
The optimal allocation method, however, provides the best estimate for the least 
cost in situations where large differences in a variable exist across strata. With this 
method, sampling is concentrated in the stratum that has the highest variance. By 
contrast, proportional allocation concentrates sampling effort in the largest stratum, 
regardless of the variance within each stratum. 
It is important to remember that the sample sizes given are only estimates of the 
number required to obtain a desired precision. Consequently, we recommend that 
data be analyzed periodically to gauge the precision of estimates. 
Confidence intervals for parameters—
A minimum of 60 samples for the landscape, or 20 samples from each stratum 
(whichever is higher), are required before the mean density (or other variables) 
of logs can be estimated. Analysis can then be done to evaluate whether enough 
samples have been collected to achieve objectives. See the “Establishing Transects” 
section of this report for an exception to the minimum number of samples required.
The two analysis options for evaluating adequacy of sample size are (1) esti-
mate average parameter and (2) compare to target parameter. Both allow the user to 
either obtain an average log parameter that is within 20 percent of the true mean at 
a desired confidence level, or determine whether the estimated value is significantly 
different from the targeted value, respectively. Users may choose both options. Go 
to the Densities (Percent Cover, Total Length, Volume, or Weight) page to obtain 
an estimated average for the parameter of interest. 
Estimate average parameter—
This option requires one of two equations based on which sampling method—
simple or stratified random—is used. To see these equations, go to the Densities 
(Percent Cover, Total Length, Volume, or Weight) page. 
For the simple random sampling method, the average is calculated in the 
standard way (equation 6). The variance is calculated by:
n
s
2
s
=
x
[14]
where
=  population mean,
n =   sample size,
s
2
 variance of the measurements,
s
x
 standard error of the mean 
, and
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
search multiple pdf files for text; find and replace text in pdf file
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
make pdf text searchable; converting pdf to searchable text format
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
42
The confidence interval is calculated using a normal approximation  
(Krebs 1989):
x ± t
t
α
s
x
[15]
where
t
α
=  Student’s t value for 90-percent confidence limits (1 - α).
As in the previous sheets, all shaded boxes require input from the user. The 
t-value is preset at 1.67, for a sample size equal to 60 to obtain a 90-percent con-
fidence interval. If a different level of confidence is desired, the t-value can be 
changed. In the first section of each variable sheet, an estimated mean is given 
based on simple random sampling methods.
In the second section, a parameter estimate with a bound is calculated based 
on stratified random sampling methods. The stratified mean for each variable is 
computed by the following equation:
A
i
=1
A
i
x
i
 
x
st
=
L
[16]
where
x
st
= stratified population mean (number per hectare),
x
i
=
observed mean in stratum i,
A
i  
=
number of hectares in stratum i,
 =  total number of hectares in subwatershed, 
i
=
stratum number, and
 =  number of strata.
To calculate a confidence interval, the stratified variance must first 
be determined:
Variance of 
n
i
W
i   
s
i
x
st
= ∑
i
=1
L
2     2
[17]
where
n
  number of samples in stratum i,
s
i
2
 variance in stratum i, and
W
i
=
stratum weight or proportion of area in stratum i
(A
/A).
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
pdf searchable text; search a pdf file for text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
how to select all text in pdf; how to make pdf text searchable
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
43
Then the confidence interval is calculated by the normal approximation:
x
st
± t
α
var(
x
st
)  
[18]
SnagPRO is designed to accommodate landscapes with different numbers of 
strata; therefore, the user must enter the correct number when prompted by the 
Number of Strata message box. This tells SnagPRO which equation to use. We 
set the limit at four strata because it is rare that more than four sampling catego-
ries will be used. In particular, with increasing number of strata comes the law 
of diminishing returns. That is, for each additional stratum, there needs to be an 
additional 10 transects (100 m or 400 ft) of sampling line. If, however, resource 
specialists find that they need to divide a landscape into five or more strata, they 
can use the Simple-Random Sampling Equation page within SnagPRO to obtain 
their stratum means (equation 6) and variances (equation 8) and then calculate a 
stratified mean estimate and its bound using equations 16 through 18.
Compare to Target Density—
The second parameter option is an informal statistical test that allows users to 
determine whether the estimated log value (density, cover, etc.) is significantly 
different from the targeted value identified as part of their standards and guidelines. 
A minimum of 60 samples for the landscape, or 20 samples from each stratum 
(whichever is higher), are required. For subwatersheds >2800 ha (7,000 ac) it may 
be necessary to increase sampling effort to compensate for the natural variability of 
logs owing to elevational gradients and other environmental conditions. 
Example: A 8097-ha (20,000-acre) subwatershed that encompasses three dis-
tinct forest community types may require about 100 samples to adequately conduct 
the Compare to Target Density test. This translates into an increase of about 1.5 
transects (100 m long) for every 405 ha (1,000 ac) surveyed above 2800 ha (7,000 
ac). This option is especially useful in situations where densities are low and the 
sampling effort is necessarily high to obtain an estimate within 20 percent of the 
true mean (90 percent of the time). Sampling is designed to assess whether the sub-
watershed meets management guidelines for logs. See the “Establishing Transects” 
section for details in transect establishment. 
The t-test is the most common way to test for a significant difference between 
two means. The t-test compares the mean along each transect to the target mean. 
This works well in single-stratum landscapes, but becomes complicated where dif-
ferent transect lengths or widths are used. Consequently, SnagPRO uses confidence 
intervals to compare means among multiple samples (Zar 1984). 
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
44
Confidence intervals can be used to evaluate whether the targeted value is dif-
ferent than the estimated value. The bound on the parameter estimate is calculated 
by using a t-statistic, so is analogous to a t-test and approximates the same distri-
bution as the Student’s t-test statistic. This approach simplified the process with 
stratified landscapes. 
The statistical comparison to estimate whether the targeted value falls within 
the confidence interval of the estimated value can be used after meeting the mini-
mum number of samples. The Statistical Test page in SnagPRO enables users to 
graph the estimated and targeted densities of a sample to visually display whether 
they are significantly different. Users simply enter the targeted value and the 
estimated value and its bounds from the log survey; the resulting graph is automati-
cally plotted. See example 2 in the “Tutorial” section for specific details. 
Wildlife Use Signs
Documenting the degree of wildlife use of logs may be of interest. For example, 
users may want to identify which log species, log diameter, or length class is associ-
ated with the most foraging signs by woodpeckers. This can be done with SnagPRO 
and SPM data. Analysis of wildlife use is only available with SPM data because 
this method was found to be more accurate than the LIM in predicting wildlife use 
(Bate and others 2004). Wildlife use that could be visually detected, such as wood-
pecker foraging or middens, was evaluated by Bate and others (2004).
SnagPRO can evaluate every log for five factors: (1) LED, (2) length, (3) 
condition, (4) species, and (5) wildlife use. (The main utility of the Wildlife Use 
function is to estimate use by wildlife.) Percentage of logs used by wildlife is 
calculated by dividing the number of logs with wildlife use by the total number of 
logs encountered.
L
t
L
s
P           
100
u
[19]
where
P
u
= percent use,
L
= number of logs with wildlife use signs, and
L
= total number of logs available or encountered.
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
45
Tutorials
Example I: Metric Weight and Density Estimates for a Single 
Stand With LIM and SPM Tally
Background example—
In the tutorial, w
e describe a specific example of how our log sampling methods 
can be used. In our example, managers are interested in assessing log conditions 
in a 24-ha, mixed-conifer stand before a seed-tree harvest to determine how much 
downed woody material should be retained during harvest. Specifically, the goal 
is to estimate the weight and density (within 20 percent of the true mean, with 
90 percent confidence) of logs that are >1 m long and >15 cm LED. The stand is 
relatively steep with slopes averaging 60 percent. The stand is buffered on most 
sides by young and mature
stands.
Weight of logs by species also is of interest, and 
consequently, log species are recorded.
Stratification—
In our example, a ground check revealed no evident differences in log distributions 
inside, versus along the edges, of the stand. Consequently, the stand is treated as a 
single stratum. A combination of sampling methods is selected to meet objectives. 
For estimates of weight, the LIM is used because log density appears to be moder-
ate (6 to 11 logs per 100 m of transect), but travel will be difficult (table 2). The 
SPM tally method will be used to estimate density.
Pilot survey—
Because of the steepness of the slope, pairs of transects that are perpendicular to 
each other are established. Five pairs of transects (10 transects) are established by 
placing a grid over a map of the stand, and then randomly selecting 10 grid points 
for the starting point of each transect. Starting points are paired together based 
on their proximity to each other. The first transect of each pair is set in a random 
compass direction, and the second transect is set 90 degrees from the first direction. 
Each 100-m transect is then divided into eight 12.5-m-long subsegments. Each 
transect is assigned a unique numeric identifier while numbering the subsegments 
1 through 8. This is done so that during the computer analysis of field data, the 
shorter subsegments can be joined into 25- and 50-m-long transect sections to 
determine the optimal transect length. For transects extending beyond stand bound-
aries, the “bounce-back” method is used to keep the transect within the sampling 
area while continuing to sample with standardized transect lengths to include stand 
edges (fig. 7). 
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
46
Field forms are secured by making copies of the data entry sheet found in the 
file named LIMdata.xls (fig. 8). (See “Field Forms” under “General Surveying 
Procedures” for complete details.) Field copies of appendix 2 are made to describe 
the sample information required under each field heading.
In the field, all intersected logs based on a minimum specific size (≥1 m long 
and ≥15 cm LED) are sampled. For each log intersected, the following information 
is collected for weight estimates:
•  Species
•  Diameter (cm) at intersection
•  Diameter (cm) of LED for size class analyses
•  Condition (sound = 1; rotten = 2) (Brown 1974)
For subsegments where no logs are intersected, “9999” is entered in the  
LED column. 
For density estimates, logs were tallied if they met minimum size requirements 
and had endpoints (fig. 4) within 2 m of the transect line. This number was entered 
in the column labeled “Tally 1.” For subsegments containing no log endpoints, a “0” 
was placed in the Tally 1 column (fig. 8). Recall that a log did not have to be inter-
sected by the transect line to qualify for the SPM tally (fig. 4). 
Data entry—
Use Sheet 1 of the file LIMdata.xls to enter data. In our example, data have been 
entered as part of the process described above. Open the file LIMdata.xls and 
click on the tab in the lower left corner, labeled “Tutorial Data-I.” Here you will 
find that the log data collected from 10 transects have been entered for this stand. 
Also notice that although the Length and Qualify columns are empty, they are still 
included so that the correct format is maintained (fig. 8).
Consecutive subsegments—
Before analyses, sort transects and subsegments in ascending order to ensure 
that eight subsegments compose each transect. In Excel, click a single cell in the 
first row and then click Data | Sort. Make sure that the entire data set has been 
highlighted for sorting. Then select Sort By transect and Then By subsegment. 
Scroll through the entire data set to ensure that eight subsegment lengths have 
been entered for each transect, and the beginning subsegment of each transect is 
numbered “1.” 
Creating a CSV file—
SnagPRO imports only CSV files. To create a CSV file, follow these steps:
1.  Activate the Tutorial_data_I sheet by clicking anywhere on the sheet: 
Select File | Save As.
A log did not have 
to be intersected 
by the transect line 
to qualify for the 
SPM tally.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested