how to upload pdf file in database using asp.net c# : How to search text in pdf document application control tool html web page .net online pnw_gtr7467-part734

Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
67
Data entry—
When using a combination of LIM and SPM, data from each stratum must be stored 
separately because of differences in data collection techniques and equations. First, 
obtain an estimate of the variable of interest (in this case, volume) for each stratum. 
Then estimates from each stratum can be entered in a special page in SnagPRO 
named Combination found under the Method menu. Estimates of the stratified 
mean, precision level, and sample sizes within each stratum and across the land-
scape are then calculated on this page.
To enter LIM data analysis, use Sheet 1 of the file LIMdata.xls. For SPM 
analysis, use Sheet 1 of the SPMdata.xls file. For this example, however, the data 
have already been entered. For LIM analysis, open the file LIMdata.xls and click 
on the tab in the lower left corner that is labeled “Tutorial Data-III-Stratum 2.”  
Here you will find log data collected from 10 transects for this stratum. 
Consecutive subsegments—
Before analyses, sort transects and subsegments in ascending order to ensure that 
there are eight subsegments for each transect. In Excel, click a single cell in the 
first row and then click Data | Sort. Make sure that the entire data set has been 
highlighted for sorting. Then select Sort By transect and Then By subsegment. 
Scroll through the entire data set to ensure that eight subsegment lengths have 
been entered for each transect, and the beginning subsegment of each transect is 
numbered “1.” 
Creating a CSV file—
SnagPRO imports only CSV files. To create a CSV file for stratum 2, follow  
these steps:
1.  Activate the “Tutorial_Data_III-Stratum 2” sheet by clicking anywhere on 
the sheet.
2.  Select File | Save As.
3.  Click Save as Type at the bottom of the Save As message box.
4.  Select “CSV (comma delimited)(*.csv).”
5.  Assign a new file name in the file name box.
6.  Click Save. When saving as a CSV file, only the active sheet is retained. 
By saving the file with a different name, the original file is kept intact.
7.  Click OK and Yes for first and second warning boxes, respectively.
To create the CSV file for stratum 3, repeat the procedure above with the 
worksheet labeled “Tutorial_Data_III-Stratum 3” found in the LIMdata.xls file. To 
create the CSV file for stratum 1, repeat the procedure above using the worksheet 
labeled “Tutorial Data-III” found in the SPMdata.xls file. 
How to search text in pdf document - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
find and replace text in pdf file; select text in pdf reader
How to search text in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to make a pdf document text searchable; text searchable pdf file
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
68
Importing to SnagPRO—
Import the CSV file of stratum 2 log data using these steps:
1.  Launch SnagPRO by double-clicking on the desktop icon or the executable 
file—SnagPRO.exe.
2.  Click Logs.
3.  Go to Measurement and click Metric.
4.  Go to Method and click LIM.
5.  Go to File | Open. In the message box “Look In,” browse to the folder 
containing the CSV data, and select the file name.
This should successfully import the CSV file onto the Single/Combined page 
of SnagPRO. Although there are three strata for this analysis, each is treated as if 
it is part of a nonstratified landscape to obtain the information necessary for input 
onto the Combination page. Therefore, all analyses will be based on the Single/
Combined page.
Note that additional columns have been added to your file. The Section and 
Segment columns were inserted between Transect and Subsegment. SnagPRO com-
bined consecutive subsegments (12.5-m lengths) into segments (25-m lengths), and 
segments into sections (50-m lengths) to allow for optimal transect length analysis.
Formula entry—
The next step is to have SnagPRO insert the appropriate formula in the Qualify 
column. This formula determines which logs are included in the current analysis. 
Begin with all logs >15 cm LED. To do this, click on Volume under the Formula 
menu on the Single/Combined page. Then click on Set Criteria button located in 
the bottom-left of the screen.
To create the correct formula, based on your survey objectives, enter:
1.  “15” for LED.
2.  “0” for Length (the default when log lengths are not measured).
3.  “0” for Condition (the default when log condition is not measured).
4.  “9999” for Species (all log species are considered).
SnagPRO evaluates each log by the criteria listed above. For logs meeting all 
criteria, SnagPRO takes the intersect diameter of each log, squares it, and places 
this value in the Qualify column. Then SnagPRO inserts these values in the LIM 
estimator (equation 4a) to obtain volume estimates.
Analyzing by Transect Length—
SnagPRO calculates averages and standard deviations for each transect length 
within each stratum on the Summary Statistics page. To calculate the statistics for 
the current forest conditions:
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
search text in pdf using java; can't select text in pdf file
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
search text in multiple pdf; pdf text search
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
69
1.  Click on the Summary Statistics tab.
2.  Click on the Single/Combined circle in the Analyze Data From section.
3.  Click on the Calculate Statistics button. 
SnagPRO subtotals the values for each transect length (Subsegment_12.5, 
Segment_25, Section_50, and Transect_100). The number on the end of each label 
gives the length of the transect in meters. To the right of the subtotaled values are 
the averages, standard deviations, and current sample sizes for each transect length. 
These values were simultaneously transferred to the Optimal page. 
Optimal transect length—
To determine the transect length that optimizes sampling in current forest condi-
tions, switch to the Optimal page. First, write a brief description of the study area 
and log characteristics in the box labeled Qualifying Logs. For example, for this 
analysis you might write: 
Qualifying Logs: Stratum 2; logs ≥15 cm LED; ≥1 m long. 
Under the heading Single/Combined on the Optimal page, notice each tran-
sect listed by name and length. The Average column provides the estimated average 
values (squared intersects multiplied by specific gravity) from the Qualify column 
for the four transect lengths. Standard deviations for these same values are shown 
in the next column. 
Results under the heading Volume (m
3
/ha) show that this stand supports about 
72.8 m
3
/ha of logs in this size class of interest (≥15 cm LED; ≥1 m long). Note that 
the English equivalent is given in the last column (1,041 ft
3
/ac). The two columns 
labeled Estimated Sample Size Required and Estimated Total Survey Distance Re-
quired, calculate the total number of transect sections and total length of transect, 
respectively, required to obtain a weight estimate within 20 percent of the true 
mean 90 percent of the time. 
To select the optimal transect length, look at the column Estimated Total Sur-
vey Distance Required. In this example, the subsegments, which are 12.5 m long, 
require the shortest length for sampling (2304 m). By contrast, if 100-m transects 
are used, 6942 m of transect length would be required. But are subsegments inde-
pendent? To test for independence:
1.  Switch back to the Summary Statistics page.
2.  Click on the Correlation button.
3.  Enter “Subsegment” into Correlation Length box. 
The message box displays the correlation coefficient (r = 0.255) and the coef-
ficient of determination (r
2
= 0.067). Based on these results, subsegments appear 
independent and may be used in this analysis.
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
converting pdf to searchable text format; select text in pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
search a pdf file for text; find text in pdf files
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
70
The last column in section two of the Optimal page is Additional Samples Re-
quired. This states how many meters of transect are still required to obtain a precise 
estimate after taking into account the sampling completed during the pilot survey. 
For this example, a little over 1300 m additional sampling would be required in 
stratum 2 to obtain a volume estimate within desired precision.
Volume analysis—
Volume estimates with a bound and precision level are given on the Volume page in 
SnagPRO. To obtain these values:
1.  Click on the Volume tab.
2.  Click on the Simple-Random Sampling Equation tab.
3.  Click the Single button under the Calculate heading.
Results indicate that this stand supports an estimated 72.8 ± 22.1 m
3
/ha of logs 
in this size class. (Recall that the precision of an estimate is calculated by dividing 
the bound by the mean.) In this example, the estimated precision is 30.4 percent, 
which can be interpreted as being 90 percent confident that the volume estimate in 
stratum 2 is within 30.4 percent of the true volume. At this point, a decision must be 
made as to whether the estimate is precise enough to meet management objectives, 
or whether to sample along 13 more 100-m transects (as indicated on the Optimal 
page) to improve the precision within this stratum. 
To ensure that accurate numbers are entered onto the Combination page, print 
the results from the Volume page. To do this: 
1.  From the File menu select Print Preview.
2.  Then choose either Print Portrait or Print Landscape.
3.  Click Print. 
The next step is to obtain volume estimates of logs ≥25 cm LED. To do this, 
repeat all steps listed above, starting with the “Formula Entry” section, but when 
prompted to enter the qualifying LED, enter 25 instead of 15. 
On the Optimal page, results indicate that subsegments are the optimal transect 
length, requiring about 3354 m of transect. Check if these lengths are independent 
by clicking on the Correlation button on the Summary Statistics page. Results 
show that adjacent subsegments for this log size class are independent (r = 0.17; r
2
0.029). Therefore, we will proceed with this length.
On the Volume page, click on the Single button to have the results from the 
Optimal page transferred. It is estimated that there are 54.1 ± 19.8 m
3
/ha of logs 
in this size class (773 ft
3
/ac). Precision is 36.6 percent. Print this page to save the 
statistics for input onto the Combination page.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
search multiple pdf files for text; how to select text in pdf
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
search pdf for text in multiple files; pdf text select tool
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
71
Stratum 3 analysis—
To obtain volume estimates for stratum 3, import the data by clicking on File and 
directing SnagPRO to the CSV file containing data for stratum 3. Then repeat 
all instructions for stratum 3, as listed above for stratum 2. Print results from the 
Volume page for both log size classes when completed. 
Based on the results shown on the Optimal page, stratum 3 supports an estimat-
ed 145 m
3
/ha of logs ≥ 15 cm LED, or 2,076 ft
3
/ac. It appears that the best transect 
length in stratum 3 is the segment. Using this length requires an estimated 443 m of 
transect, assuming the segments are independent. 
The serial correlation test, however, shows that segments may not be indepen-
dent (r = 0.45). Values above this level are not considered independent (r = 0.403;  
r
2
= 0.163). Although we will continue to use this transect length for our analysis, 
assume for a moment that we want to choose a different length. The next best 
choice would be subsegments based on the results on the Optimal page. The cor-
relation test on subsegments shows that this length can be considered independent 
(r = 0.063; r
2
= 0.004). Subsegments, rather than segments, are better sampling units 
in this case because of the systematic distribution of logs. Segments were likely 
regularly hitting, or missing, clumps of logs, whereas using subsegments minimized 
this phenomenon. Note that the optimal transect length identified by SnagPro can 
be overriden by selecting a different Optimal Selection from the Settings menu 
and using the resulting statistics in the analysis. 
The Volume page shows that stratum 3 supports an estimated 145 ± 19.3 m
3
/ha. 
In addition, because log volume was consistently high throughout the stands, with 
low variability, the precision for this size class, 13.3 percent, has exceeded the 
desired level. Print the results on the Volume page for use on the Combination page.
Repeating this process for large (≥ 25 cm LED) logs in stratum 3 shows a vol-
ume of 89.1 ± 20.6 m
3
/ha. The precision of 23.1 percent is approaching the desired 
level of 20 percent. Subsegments provide the most precise measurement and can 
be considered independent (r = 0.187; r
2
= 0.035). Sample size required equals 1334 
m of transect length. Print results on the Volume page for use on the Combination 
page. This completes the analysis with LIM data.
Strip-plot method of analysis—
To obtain SPM volume estimates for stratum 1, import the data into the SPM 
portion of SnagPRO by using the following steps:
1.  Click Logs under Habitat Component.
2.  From the Method menu click SPM.
3.  Click Yes to reaffirm a new analysis.
Subsegments, rather 
than segments, are 
better sampling units 
in this case because 
of the systematic 
distribution of logs. 
Segments were likely 
regularly hitting, 
or missing, clumps 
of logs, whereas 
using subsegments 
minimized this 
phenomenon.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
select text pdf file; pdf searchable text converter
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option. 'Open a document Dim doc As
cannot select text in pdf; pdf editor with search and replace text
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
72
4.  Click Open in the File menu.
5.  Direct SnagPRO to the folder where the CSV file containing the SPM data 
can be found.
This should successfully import the CSV file onto the Single/Combined page  
of SnagPRO. Note that the Section and Segment columns have been added to the 
file, inserted between Transect and Subsegment. Also note that although informa-
tion about endpoints (for density estimates) were not collected, a column labeled 
Endpoint appears on the data sheet. This formatting is necessary for SnagPRO to 
work properly. 
Formula entry—
The next step is to have SnagPRO insert the appropriate formula in the Qualify 
column for stratum 1. This formula determines which logs are included in the cur-
rent analysis. To do this: 
1.  From the Formula menu, select Volume.
2.  “10” for LED.
3.  “0” for EstimLength because you want all logs to be included and only 
logs ≥1 m long were measured.
4.  “3” for Condition (all decay classes considered).
5.  “9999” for Species (all log species considered).
For logs meeting the above criteria, SnagPRO calculates the volume of  
each portion of the log contained within the plot. This value is placed in the  
Qualify column. 
Analyzing by transect length—
SnagPRO calculates averages and standard deviations for each transect length 
within each stratum on the Summary Statistics page. To calculate the statistics for 
stratum 1:
1.  Click on the Summary Statistics page.
2.  Click on the Single/Combined circle in the Analyze Data From section.
3.  Click on the Calculate Statistics button. 
Optimal transect length—
Switch to the Optimal page and write a brief description of the stratum and size 
class of log being analyzed. For example:
Qualifying Logs: Stratum 1; SPM; logs ≥ 15 cm LED; ≥ 1 m long.
The results in the Volume (m
3
/ha) column show that this stand supports about 
39.3 m
3
/ha (562 ft
3
/ac) of logs (> 15 cm LED and > 1 m long). Segments appear to be 
the best choice for transect length, requiring an estimated 3254 m. Results of the 
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
73
serial correlation test, shown on the Summary Statistics page, indicate that adjacent 
segments are independent (r = 0.126; r
2
= 0.016). 
Volume analysis—
Once the Volume page is activated, enter the area of stratum 1 (812) in the box 
labeled “Landscape Area.” Results show that stratum 1 contains an estimated 39.3 
± 14.2 m
3
/ha. Precision is 36.1 percent. Print the results on the Volume page for use 
on the Combination page at the end.
Results for large (≥25 cm LED) logs in stratum 1, using the same analytical 
process, yields a volume of 33.8 ± 14 m
3
/ha. Precision is 41.4 percent. Segments 
provide the most precise measurement and are independent (r = 0.134; r
2
= 0.018). 
Estimated sample size required equals 4270 m. Print the results on the Volume page 
for use on the Combination page. 
Stratified volume analysis—
To obtain a stratified volume estimate using both the LIM and SPM sampling 
methods, the statistics expressed in a per-unit basis from each Volume page gener-
ated above, must be entered onto the Combination page. To do this:
1.  Click on Combination from the Method menu.
2.  Click Yes to change the method.
3.  Click Volume from the Formula menu.
There are two sheets available on the Combination page. Shaded boxes require 
input from users. The Parameter Estimate page (fig. 18) uses a stratified-random 
sampling equation to calculate a mean, bound, and precision for measurements 
expressed in a per-unit basis (hectares or acres). The Sample Sizes page provides 
the Estimated Sample Size Required for estimates expressed in hectares or acres. 
Follow these steps to obtain an estimate of log volume (≥15 cm LED) for the 
entire subwatershed using the results printed out for each stratum: 
1.  Enter the numbers “1,” “2,” and “3” under the heading Stratum.
2.  Under the heading Transect Section Names select Segment, Subsegment, 
and Segment from the drop-down menu for strata 1, 2, and 3, respectively.
3.  Enter the numbers “812,” “654,” and “490” for number of hectares in strata 
1, 2, and 3, respectively.
4.  Enter the estimated volume of logs per hectare for each strata under the 
heading Parameter Estimates. For strata 1, 2, and 3 there were 39.3, 72.8, 
and 145 m
3
/ha, respectively.
5.  Enter the estimated variance for strata 1, 2, and 3. These values were 2884, 
14,027, and 5,370, respectively. 
6.  Enter the number of samples for each stratum. This should be 40, 80, and 
40 for strata 1, 2, and 3, respectively. 
Figure 18—Parameter Estimates spreadsheet in Combo file: stratified mean volume estimate with a 90-percent confidence 
interval for qualifying logs. Data are from Tutorial III using line-intersect method (LIM) for one stratum and strip-plot 
method (SPM) for another.
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
74
The stratified volume estimate for this subwatershed is 77 ± 10.6 m
3
/ha with 
a precision of 13.8 percent (fig. 18). Repeating this process for large logs yields a 
stratified volume estimate of 54.4 ± 10.2 m
3
/ha with a precision of 19 percent. 
Conclusions for multiple strata using a combination of LIM and SPM—
Although the estimates of log volume within strata 1 and 2 were not as precise as 
desired (were not <20 percent), the stratified estimates of log volume for the entire 
subwatershed exceeded the desired precision for logs in both size classes. This sug-
gests that both the sampling design and stratification process for this subwatershed 
worked well to meet objectives. 
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
75
As shown by these Tutorials, SnagPro offers a variety of analysis procedures 
geared to meet different management objectives. Key analytical steps included in 
these examples were importing data from an Excel spreadsheet, obtaining a variety 
of basic metrics on unstratified and stratified data, and use of a pilot sample to 
estimate the appropriate sample size needed to meet overall survey objectives.
The importance of logs in research and management to meet a variety of 
resource objectives suggests that methods outlined here are needed as an efficient 
and accurate way to evaluate log conditions. Supporting SnagPro software pro-
vides a process of data entry, management, and analysis that is easy to follow and 
minimizes analysis mistakes. We urge researchers and managers of logs to consider 
using these tools to aid in the work on this important resource. 
Acknowledgments
We thank Ray Davis, Deb Hennessy, Jennifer Weikel, and Christina Vojta for 
detailed comments on SnagPRO operations and this manuscript. Kim Mellen and 
Amy Jacobs reviewed earlier versions of our manuscript. Daniel Jones, Jennifer 
Carpenedo, Gene Paul, Kent Coe, Alexa Michel, Darren Hopkins, Damon Page, 
Cynthia Sandoval, Eric Sandoz, Lee Stultz, and Peter Barry assisted in data col-
lection. Andrew Youngblood and Kerry Mettlen assisted in obtaining land area 
measurements. The USDA Forest Service—specifically the Pacific Northwest Re-
search Station and Washington office of National Forest System—provided funding 
for this project. The Flathead National Forest in Montana provided equipment and 
consultation. We also thank James Brown and Tim Max for their assistance with 
sampling methods pertaining to the line-intersect method. Kirk Steinhorst provided 
advice and reviews of statistical methods presented here. 
English Equivalents
When you know:
Multiply by:
To find:
Centimeters (cm)
0.394
Inches (in)
Meters (m)
3.281
Feet (ft)
Square meters (m
2
)
10.76
Square feet (ft
2
)
Hectares (ha)
2.471
Acres (ac)
Logs per ha (logs/ha)
.405
Logs per acre (logs/ac)
Meters per ha (m/ha)
1.328
Feet per acre (ft/ac)
Cubic meters per ha (m
3
/ha)
14.29
Cubic feet per acre (ft
3
/ac)
Metric tons per ha
.446
English tons per acre
Kilograms per cubic meter (kg/m
3
)
.0624
Pounds per cubic foot (lb/ft
3
)
The importance of 
logs in research and 
management to meet 
a variety of resource 
objectives suggests 
that methods outlined 
here are needed as an 
efficient and accurate 
way to evaluate log 
conditions.
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
76
References
Bartels, R.; Dell, J.D.; Knight, R.L.; Schaefer, G. 1985. Dead and down woody 
material. In: Brown, E.R., tech. ed. Management of wildlife and fish habitats  
in forests of western Oregon and Washington. Part 1: Chapter narratives.  
R-6F&WL-191-1985. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest 
Service, Pacific Northwest Region: 171–186.
Bate, L.J.; Garton, E.O.; Wisdom, M.J. 1999a. Estimating snag and large tree 
densities and distributions on a landscape for wildlife management. Gen. Tech. 
Rep. PNW-GTR-425. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest 
Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 76 p.
Bate, L.J.; Torgersen, T.R.; Garton, E.O.; Wisdom, M.J. 1999b. Estimating 
the density, total length, and percent cover of logs on a landscape for wildlife 
management. Unpublished report. On file with: USDA Forest Service, Forestry 
and Range Sciences Laboratory, 1401 Gekeler Lane, La Grande, OR 97850.
Bate, L.J.; Torgersen, T.R.; Garton, E.O.; Wisdom, M.J. 2004. Performance of 
two sampling methods to estimate log characteristics for wildlife. Forest Ecology 
and Management. 199(2004): 83–102.
Bate, L.J.; Wisdom, M.J.; Garton, E.O.; Clabough, S.C. [In press]. SnagPRO: 
snag and large tree sampling methods and analyses for wildlife. Gen. Tech. Rep. 
Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest 
Research Station.
Bell, G.; Kerr, A.; McNickle, D.; Woollons, R. 1996. Accuracy of the line 
intersect method of post-logging sampling under orientation bias. Forest Ecology 
and Management. 84(1996): 23–28.
Brown, J.K. 1974. Handbook for inventorying downed woody material. Gen. Tech. 
Rep. INT-GTR-16. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, 
Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 24 p.
Brown, J.K.; See, T.E. 1981. Downed dead wood fuel and biomass in the Northern 
Rocky Mountains. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-117. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment 
Station. 48 p.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested