Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
77
Bull, E.L.; Carter, B.; Henjum, M. [and others]. 1991. Monitoring protocol-
October 1991. Protocol for monitoring woodpeckers and snags in the Pacific 
Northwest region of U.S. Forest Service. Unpublished report. 8 p. On file with: 
USDA Forest Service, Forestry and Range Sciences Laboratory, 1401 Gekeler 
Lane, La Grande, OR 97850.
Bull, E.L.; Henjum, M.G. 1990. Ecology of the great gray owl. Gen. Tech. Rep. 
PNW-GTR-265. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, 
Pacific Northwest Research Station. 39 p.
Bull, E.L.; Holthausen, R.S. 1993. Habitat use and management of pileated 
woodpeckers in northeastern Oregon. Journal of Wildlife Management.  
57: 335–345.
Bull, E.L.; Parks, C.G.; Torgersen, T.R. 1997. Trees and logs important to 
wildlife in the interior Columbia River basin. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-391. 
Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest 
Research Station. 55 p.
Bull, E.L.; Torgersen, T.R.; Wertz, T.L. 2001. The importance of vegetation, 
insects, and neonate ungulates in black bear diet in northeastern Oregon. 
Northwest Science. 75: 244–253.
Carey, A.B.; Johnson, M.L. 1995. Small mammals in managed, unharvested 
young, and old-growth forests. Ecological Applications. 5: 336–352.
Cochran, W.G. 1977. Sampling techniques. 3
rd
ed. New York: John Wiley and 
Sons. 428 p.
De Vries, P.G. 1973. A general theory on line intersect sampling with application 
to logging residue inventory. Wageningen, The Netherlands: Mededelingen 
Landbouwhogeschool 73–11. 23 p.
Franklin, J.F.; Cromack, K., Jr.; Denison, W. [and others]. 1981. Ecological 
characteristics of old-growth Douglas-fir forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-118. 
Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest 
Forest and Range Experiment Station. 48 p.
Fischer, W.C. 1981. Photo guide for appraising downed woody fuels in Montana 
forests: grand fir-larch-Douglas-fir, western hemlock, western hemlock-western 
redcedar, and western redcedar cover types. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-96. Ogden, 
UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and 
Range Experiment Station. 53 p.
Pdf searchable text converter - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf text searchable; find text in pdf image
Pdf searchable text converter - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf search and replace text; pdf text search tool
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
78
Harmon, M.E.; Franklin, J.F.; Swanson, F.J. [and others]. 1986. Ecology of 
coarse woody debris in temperate ecosystems. Advances in Ecological Research. 
15: 133–302.
Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Larsen, M.J.; Graham, R.T. 1987. Decaying 
organic materials and soil quality in the inland Northwest: a management 
opportunity. Gen. Tech. Rep. INT-GTR-225. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Forest Service, Intermountain Forest and Range Experiment 
Station. 15 p.
Hayes, J.P.; Cross, S.P. 1987. Characteristics of logs used by western red-backed 
voles and deer mice. Canadian Field Naturalist. 101: 543–546.
Hazard, J.W.; Pickford, S.G. 1978. Simulation studies on line intercept sampling 
of forest residue. Forest Science. 24: 469–483.
Hazard, J.W.; Pickford, S.G. 1986. Simulation studies on line intersect sampling 
of forest residue, Part II. Forest Science. 32: 447–470.
Hurlbert, S.H. 1984. Pseudoreplication and the design of ecological field 
experiments. Ecological Monographs. 54(2): 187–211.
Husch, B.; Miller, C.I.; Beers, T.W. 1972. Forest mensuration. 2
nd
ed. New York: 
Ronald Press Company. 410 p. 
Jurgensen, M.F.; Harvey, A.E.; Graham, R.T. [and others]. 1997. Impacts of 
timber harvesting on soil organic matter, nitrogen, productivity, and health of 
inland Northwest forests. Forest Science. 43: 234–251.
Koehler, G.M.; Aubry, K.B. 1994. Lynx. In: Ruggiero, L.F.; Aubry, K.B.; 
Buskirk, S.W. [and others], tech. eds. The scientific basis for conserving forest 
carnivores. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-254. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment 
Station: 74–98.
Krebs, C.J. 1989. Ecological methodology. New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 
Inc. 654 p.
Lofroth, E. 1998. The dead wood cycle. In: Voller, J.; Harrison, S., eds. 
Conservation biology principles for forested landscapes. Vancouver, BC: UBC 
Press: 185–214.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
document to editable & searchable text file. Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit
pdf make text searchable; how to select text in a pdf
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
document to editable & searchable text file. Different from other C# .NET PDF to text conversion controls, RasterEdge C# PDF to text converter control toolkit
text select tool pdf; search pdf documents for text
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
79
Maser, C.; Anderson, R.G.; Ralph, G. [and others]. 1979. Dead and down woody 
material. In: Thomas, J.W., tech. ed. Wildlife habitats in managed forests—the 
Blue Mountains of Oregon and Washington. Agric. Handb. 533. Washington, 
DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service: 78–95.
Mellen, K.; Marcot, B.G.; Ohmann, J.L. [and others]. 2006. DecAID, the 
decayed wood advisor for managing snags, partially dead trees, and down wood 
for biodiversity in forests of Washington and Oregon. Version 2.0. Portland, 
OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region 
and Pacific Northwest Research Station; U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish 
and Wildlife Service, Oregon State Office. http://wwwnotes.fs.fed.us:81/pnw/
DecAID/DecAID.nsf. (19 December 2007).
Norris, L.A. 1990. An overview and synthesis of knowledge concerning natural 
and prescribed fire in the Pacific Northwest forest. In: Walstad, J.D.; Radosevich, 
S.R.; Sandberg, D.V., eds. Natural and prescribed fire in Pacific Northwest 
forests. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Press: 7–22. Chapter 2.
Powell, R.A.; Zielinski, W.J. 1994. Fisher. In: Ruggiero, L.F.; Aubry, K.B; 
Buskirk, S.W. [and others], tech. eds. The scientific basis for conserving forest 
carnivores. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-GTR-254. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment 
Station: 38–73.
Quigley, T.M.; Haynes, R.W.; Graham, R.T., tech. eds. 1996. Integrated 
scientific assessment for ecosystem management in the interior Columbia basin 
and portions of the Klamath and Great Basins. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR-382. 
Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest 
Research Station. 303 p.
Sandberg, D.V.; Ottmar, R.D. 1983. Slash burning and fuel consumption in the 
Douglas-fir subregion. In: Proceedings of the 7
th
American Meteorological 
Society and Society of American Foresters conference on fire and forest 
meteorology. Boston, MA: American Meteorological Society: 90–93. 
Sheehan, K.A. 1996. Effects of insecticide treatments on subsequent defoliation by 
western spruce budworm in Oregon and Washington: 1982-92. Gen. Tech. Rep. 
PNW-GTR-367. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, 
Pacific Northwest Research Station. 55 p.
Sokal, R.R.; Rohlf, F.J. 1981. Biometry. New York: W.H. Freeman and Company. 
859 p.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats.
cannot select text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf and copy
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
for VB.NET provides users fast and accurate image recognition function, which converts scanned images into searchable text formats, such as PDF, PDF/A, WORD
pdf select text; how to select all text in pdf
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
80
Swihart, R.K.; Slade, N.A. 1985. Testing for independence of observations in 
animal movements. Ecology. 66(4): 1176–1184.
Tallmon, D.; Mills, S. 1994. Use of logs within home ranges of California red-
backed voles on a remnant of forest. Journal of Mammalogy. 75: 97–101. 
Torgersen, T.R.; Bull, E.L. 1995. Down logs as habitat for forest-dwelling ants—
the primary prey of pileated woodpeckers in northeastern Oregon. Northwest 
Science. 69: 294–303.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 1991. Field procedures guide: 
stand examination program. Portland, OR: Pacific Northwest Region. 62 p.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. 1995. Flathead National Forest 
Plan. Kalispell, MT. 555 p.
Walstad, J.D.; Radosevich, S.R.; Sandberg, D.V. 1990. Natural and prescribed 
fire in Pacific Northwest forests. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Press. 
317 p.
Warren, W.G.; Olsen, P.F. 1964. A line intersect technique for assessing logging 
waste. Forest Science. 10(3): 267-276.
Zar, J.H. 1984. Biostatistical analysis. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. 
718 p.
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
pdf find text; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications. C#.NET PDF Document Drawing Application.
how to select text in pdf image; text searchable pdf
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
81
Appendix 1: Customized Log Measuring Sticks
We recommend buying calipers for log surveys, but realize that the investment 
in calipers to measure log diameters may make log sampling cost prohibitive. 
Although not as accurate as calipers, customized log measuring sticks provide an 
economical and efficient alternative. The stick consists of three parts: (1) straight 
rule on one side, (2) graduated rule on opposite side, and (3) square. The straight-
ruled side is for measuring log lengths within the strip plots. The graduated rule is 
a Biltmore stick, which gives diameter measurements. Finally, the square is useful 
to help determine the outer boundaries of the plots used in the strip-plot method 
(SPM) (fig. 2a and 2b). The figure below illustrates the design and construction 
using a hardwood with metric measurements. For English measurement users, the 
measuring stick should be 3 ft long.
Biltmore sticks should be held 63.5 cm (25 in) from the eyes. This can be 
customized, however, to meet the needs of the user. Closing one eye, line up the 
zero end of the stick with one side of the tree. Both the straight and graduated rules 
should begin at the far side of the stick. Then shift the same eye, while maintaining 
the position of your head, to read where the opposite side of the tree intersects the 
Biltmore graduations. The place where the two intersect, indicates the diameter of 
the log. 
The graduations for creating the Biltmore side of the stick can be found by the 
following equation (Husch and others 1972):
B
D
D
E
=
1+
where
B = distance from zero point of the stick to the position for a given diameter,
D = log diameter, and
E = perpendicular distance from eye to stick.
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
make pdf text searchable; search pdf files for text
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
PDF converter SDK for converting adobe PDF from TXT in Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF
pdf find and replace text; search text in pdf image
Height = 2.9 cm
Width = 1.9 cm
1.0 m
30 cm
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
100
130
170
200
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
82
Straight rule on back side
Graduated rule on front side
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
less searchable for search engines. The other is the crashing problem when user is visiting the PDF file using web browser. Our PDF to HTML converter library
find and replace text in pdf; convert pdf to word searchable text
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word.
how to make a pdf file text searchable; pdf find highlighted text
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
83
Appendix 2: Line-Intersect Method  
(LIM) Field Form Explanations
Example of log definition:
For the purposes of this study, a “log” is defined as any down wood piece whose 
large-end diameter (LED) is >7.6 cm (3 in). A log qualifies if its central axis (the 
center of the bole or the pith) is intersected by the transect line (fig. 3). Its axis must 
lie above the ground (above duff and mineral soil layer). Dead stems attached to 
a live tree are not counted. Multiple branches attached to dead trees or shrubs are 
each tallied separately. For leaning dead trees, if the angle between the dead tree 
and the ground is <45 degrees it is a log; if greater, it is a snag. If the central axis of 
a suspended log is <1.8 m above the ground where the transect passes, tally the log 
on the transect; otherwise, disregard it. 
1.   Stratum: Enter the stratum number: 1, 2, 3, or 4.   
2.    Location: Enter the stand number in which the plot is contained.
3.   Transect: Assign a unique numeric identifier to indicate which 100-m 
or 400-ft transect is being surveyed (e.g., 1, 2, 3, or 4). No two transects 
within a survey area should be the same regardless of the stratum.
4.    Subsegment: Assign a unique numeric identifier (1 through 8) to indicate 
which 12.5-m (or 50-ft) subsegment is being surveyed. Most importantly, 
the first subsegment of each transect should start with “1.” This will allow 
SnagPRO to correctly join consecutive subsegments.
5.    Species: SnagPRO can accommodate either alpha (six characters) or nu-
meric data. Listed below are the standardized species codes taken from 
the stand exam program in the Pacific Northwest Region [USDA Forest 
Service 1991]. Customize for your own use.
Douglas-fir/redwoods:
Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco)  
202
Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl.)  
211
True firs:
Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis Dougl. ex Forbes)  
011
White fir (Abies concolor (Gord. & Glend.) Lindl. ex Hildebr.) 
015
Grand fir (Abies grandis (Dougl. ex D. Don) Lindl.) 
017
Subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) 
019
California red fir (Abies magnifica A. Murray var. magnifica A. Murray)  020
Shasta red fir (Abies magnifica A. Murray var. shastensis Lemmon)  
021
Noble fir (Abies procera Rehd.) 
022
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
84
Cedars:
Port Orford cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murr.) Parl.) 
041
Alaska cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach) 
042
Incense-cedar (Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.) Florin) 
081
Western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don) 
242
Larch:
Western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) 
073
Spruce:
Brewer spruce (Picea breweriana Wats.) 
092
Englemann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex Englm.) 
093
Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) 
098
Pines:
Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) 
108
Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi Grev. & Balf.) 
116
Sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana Dougl.) 
117
Western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) 
119
Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) 
122
Hemlock:
Western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) 
263
Mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana (Bong.) Carr.) 
264
Hardwoods:
Bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum Pursh) 
312
Red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) 
351
Western paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) 
376
Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii Pursh) 
361
Golden chinkapin (Castanopsis chrysophylla (Dougl.) A. DC) 
431
Oregon ash (Fraxinus latifolia Benth.) 
542
Tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Rehd.) 
631
Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) 
746
Black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) 
747
Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana Dougl. ex Hook.) 
815
California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.) 
818
Oregon myrtle (Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt.) 
981
Log Sampling Methods and Software for Stand and Landscape Analyses
85
Other conifers:
Subalpine larch (Larix lyallii Parl.) 
072
Cypress (Cupressus) 
050
All junipers (Juniperus) 
060
Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia Nutt.) 
231
Knobcone pine (Pinus attenuate Lemm.) 
103
Limber pine (Pinus flexilis James) 
113
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) 
101
6.    Intersect: Enter the diameter (cm or in) of the qualifying log at the point 
where the transect intersects the log (fig. 3). 
7.    LED: Enter the LED in centimeters (in) of the qualifying log that is 
intersected. If roots are still attached, measure the LED just above the 
butt swell where the breast height would occur if the tree were still stand-
ing (fig. 5). This is important: If no logs are encountered along the entire 
length of the subsegment, enter “9999” in the LED space.
8.    Condition: Enter the numeric value (1 or 2) for the corresponding decay 
class (hard or soft) of the log encountered. See Maser and others (1979) 
and Bull and others (1997) for more detailed decay classes and definitions 
that also can be used.
1= Sound (hard, would burn for awhile)
2= Rotten (decayed, not much fuel value)
9.    Length: (Optional) Enter the total length of the log including the rootwad, 
if present. Measure out to where the small-end diameter is 2.5 cm or 1 in 
(fig. 1a). 
GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PNW-GTR-746
86
Appendix 3: Split-Plot Method  
(SPM) Field Form Explanations
Example of log definition:
For the purposes of this study, a log is defined as any down woody piece with a 
large-end diameter (LED) >23 cm (9 in) and >1 m (39 in) in length. To be counted, 
>0.1 m (4 in) length of a log must be contained within the plot (fig. 1). For logs 
broken into two pieces, treat them as one log if the pieces are touching. Otherwise, 
treat them as separate logs. Its axis must lie above the ground (above duff and 
mineral soil layer). Dead stems attached to a live tree are not counted. Multiple 
branches attached to dead trees or shrubs are each tallied separately. For leaning 
dead trees, if the angle between the dead tree and the ground is < 45 degrees, it is 
a log; if greater, it is a snag. If the central axis of a suspended log is >1.8 m (6 ft) 
above the ground within the strip plot, disregard it. 
1.  Stratum: Enter the stratum number: 1, 2, 3, or 4.   
2.  Location: Enter the stand number in which the plot is contained.
3.  Transect: Assign a unique numeric identifier to indicate which 100-m 
or 400-ft transect is being surveyed (e.g., 1, 2, 3, or 4). No two transects 
should be the same regardless of the stratum.
4.   Subsegment: Assign a unique numeric identifier (1 through 8) to indicate 
which subsegment is being surveyed. Most importantly, the first subseg-
ment of each transect should start with “1.” This will allow SnagPRO to 
correctly join consecutive subsegments.
5.  LED: Enter the LED of the qualifying log, regardless if it falls in or out of 
the boundaries of the strip plot, to the nearest centimeter or inch. If roots 
are still attached, measure the LED just above the butt swell where breast 
height would occur if the tree were still standing (fig. 5). Otherwise, mea-
sure diameter at largest point where log is still intact. This is important: 
enter the number “9999” if no logs were contained within this plot. 
6.   Endpoint: For each qualifying log whose endpoint (LED) falls within the 
boundaries of the plot, enter “1”; otherwise, enter “0.” If density is the only 
parameter of interest, simply conduct a tally of logs whose endpoints are 
contained within the strip plot boundaries. If no endpoints are contained 
within a subsegment, record “9999” in the LED column and “0” in the 
Endpoint column.
7.   Large: For logs within the plot boundaries, enter the diameter (cm or in) of 
the log at its large end (see fig. 1b).
8.   Small: For logs within the plot boundaries, enter the diameter (cm or in) of 
the log at its smallest end (fig. 1b). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested