how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Select text in pdf file application Library tool html .net web page online R%20dummies10-part970

1st  2nd  3rd  4th  5th  6th
-67   25   20   50  -67 -267
That last value doesn’t look right, because it’s impossible to score more than
100 percent fewer baskets. R doesn’t just give you that weird result; it also warns
you that the length of 
diff(baskets.of.Granny)
doesn’t fit the length of
baskets.of.Granny
:
Warning message:
In diff(baskets.of.Granny)/baskets.of.Granny :
longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length
The vector 
baskets.of.Granny
is six values long, but the outcome of
diff(baskets.of.Granny)
is only five values long. So the decrease of 267 percent
is, in fact, the last value of 
baskets.of.Granny
divided by the first value of
diff(baskets.of.Granny)
. In this example, the shortest vector,
diff(baskets.of.Granny)
, gets recycled by the division operator.
That result wasn’t what you intended. To prevent that outcome, you should
use only the first five values of 
baskets.of.Granny
, so the length of both vectors
match:
> round(diff(baskets.of.Granny) / baskets.of.Granny[1:5] * 100)
2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
-67  25  20  50 -67
And all that is vectorization.
Select text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
text select tool pdf; search pdf for text in multiple files
Select text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to select all text in pdf; pdf text searchable
Chapter 5
Getting Started with Reading and Writing
In This Chapter
Representing textual data with character vectors
Working with text
Creating, converting, and working with factors
It’s not for no reason that reading and writing are considered to be two of the
three Rs in elementary education (reading, ’riting, and ’rithmetic). In this chapter,
you get to work with words in R.
You assign text to variables. You manipulate these variables in many different
ways, including finding text within text and concatenating different pieces of text
into a single vector. You also use R functions to sort text and to find words in text
with some powerful pattern search functions, called regular expressions. Finally,
you work with factors, the R way of representing categories (or categorical data, as
statisticians call it).
Using Character Vectors for Text Data
Text in R is represented by character vectors. A character vector is — you
guessed it! — a vector consisting of characters. In Figure 5-1, you can see that
each element of a character vector is a bit of text.
In the world of computer programming, text often is referred to as a string.
In this chapter, we use the word text to refer to a single element of a vector,
but you should be aware that the R Help files sometimes refer to strings and
sometimes to text. They mean the same thing.
Figure 5-1: Each element of a character vector is a bit of text, also known as a string.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
searching pdf files for text; can't select text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
how to search a pdf document for text; how to select text in a pdf
In this section, you take a look at how R uses character vectors to represent
text. You assign some text to a character vector and get it to extract subsets of
that data. You also get familiar with the very powerful concept of named vectors,
vectors in which each element has a name. This is useful because you can then
refer to the elements by name as well as position.
Assigning a value to a character vector
You assign a value to a character vector by using the assignment operator
(
<-
), the same way you do for all other variables. You test whether a variable is of
class 
character
, for example, by using the 
is.character()
function as follows:
> x <- “Hello world!”
> is.character(x)
TRUE
Notice that 
x
is a character vector of length 1. To find out how many
characters are in the text, use 
nchar
:
> length(x)
[1] 1
> nchar(x)
[1] 12
This function tells you that 
x
has length 1 and that the single element in 
x
has
12 characters.
Creating a character vector with more than one element
To create a character vector with more than one element, use the combine
function, 
c()
:
x <- c(“Hello”, “world!”)
> length(x)
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
pdf find highlighted text; find text in pdf image
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Enable users abilities to adjust color and transparency while scraping text from PDF file. Able to redact selected text in PDF document.
search pdf documents for text; convert pdf to searchable text online
[1] 2
> nchar(x)
[1] 5 6
Notice that this time, R tells you that your vector has length 2 and that the
first element has five characters and the second element has six characters.
Extracting a subset of a vector
You use the same indexing rules for character vectors that you use for
numeric vectors (or for vectors of any type). The process of referring to a
subset of a vector through indexing its elements is also called subsetting. In
other words, subsetting is the process of extracting a subset of a vector.
To illustrate how to work with vectors, and specifically how to create subsets,
we use the built-in datasets 
letters
and 
LETTERS
. Both are character vectors
consisting of the letters of the alphabet, in lowercase (
letters
) and uppercase
(
LETTERS
). Try it:
> letters
[1] “a” “b” “c” “d” “e” “f” “g” “h” “i” “j” “k”
[12] “l” “m” “n” “o” “p” “q” “r” “s” “t” “u” “v”
[23] “w” “x” “y” “z”
> LETTERS
[1] “A” “B” “C” “D” “E” “F” “G” “H” “I” “J” “K”
[12] “L” “M” “N” “O” “P” “Q” “R” “S” “T” “U” “V”
[23] “W” “X” “Y” “Z”
Aside from being useful to illustrate the use of subsets in this chapter, you
can use these built-in vectors whenever you need to make lists of things.
Let’s return to the topic of creating subsets. To extract a specific element from
a vector, use square brackets. To get the tenth element of 
letters
, for example,
use the following:
> letters[10]
[1] “j”
To get the last three elements of 
LETTERS
, use the following:
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
how to make pdf text searchable; how to search pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
pdf text search; pdf find and replace text
> LETTERS[24:26]
[1] “X” “Y” “Z”
The colon operator (
:
) in R is a handy way of creating sequences, so 
24:26
results in 
25, 25, 26
. When this appears inside the square brackets, R returns
elements 24 through 26.
In our last example, it was easy to extract the last three letters of 
LETTERS
,
because you know that the alphabet contains 26 letters. Quite often, you don’t
know the length of a vector. You can use the 
tail()
function to display the
trailing elements of a vector. To get the last five elements of 
LETTERS
, try the
following:
> tail(LETTERS, 5)
[1] “V” “W” “X” “Y” “Z”
Similarly, you can use the 
head()
function to get the first element of a
variable. By default, both 
head()
and 
tail()
returns six elements, but you can tell
it to return any specific number of elements in the second argument. Try extracting
the first ten 
letters
:
> head(letters, 10)
[1] “a” “b” “c” “d” “e” “f” “g” “h” “i” “j”
Naming the values in your vectors
Until this point in the book, we’ve referred to the elements of vectors by their
positions — that is, 
x[5]
refers to the fifth element in vector 
x
. One very powerful
feature in R, however, gives names to the elements of a vector, which allows you
to refer to the elements by name.
You can use these named vectors in R to associate text values (names)
with any other type of value. Then you can refer to these values by name in
addition to position in the list. This format has a wide range of applications —
for example, named vectors make it easy to create lookup tables.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online, convert CSV to save signatures to OpenOffice and CSV file. Viewer particular text tool can select text on all
pdf text select tool; cannot select text in pdf
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
search text in multiple pdf; pdf text search tool
Looking at how named vectors work
To illustrate named vectors, take a look at the built-in dataset 
islands
, a
named vector that contains the surface area of the world’s 48 largest land masses
(continents and large islands). You can investigate its structure with 
str()
, as
follows:
> str(islands)
Named num [1:48] 11506 5500 16988 2968 16 ...
- attr(*, “names”)= chr [1:48] “Africa” “Antarctica” “Asia” “Australia”
...
R reports the structure of 
islands
as a named vector with 48 elements. In the
first line of the results of 
str()
, you see the values of the first few elements of
islands
. On the second line, R reports that the named vector has an attribute
containing 
names
and reports that the first few elements are 
“Africa”
,
“Antarctica”
“Asia”
, and
“Australia”
.
Because each element in the vector has a value as well as a name, now you
can subset the vector by name. To retrieve the sizes of Asia, Africa, and Antarctica,
use the following:
> islands[c(“Asia”, “Africa”, “Antarctica”)]
Asia     Africa Antarctica
16988      11506       5500
You use the 
names()
function to retrieve the names in a named vector:
> names(islands)[1:9]
[1] “Africa”       “Antarctica”   “Asia”
[4] “Australia”    “Axel Heiberg” “Baffin”
[7] “Banks”        “Borneo”       “Britain”
This function allows you to do all kinds of interesting things. Imagine you
wanted to know the names of the six largest islands. To do this, you would retrieve
the names of 
islands
after sorting it in decreasing order:
> names(sort(islands, decreasing=TRUE)[1:6])
[1] “Asia”          “Africa”        “North America”
[4] “South America” “Antarctica”    “Europe”
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
find text in pdf files; convert pdf to searchable text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Default create. Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page.
text searchable pdf; search pdf for text
Creating and assigning named vectors
You use the assignment operator (
<-
) to assign names to vectors in much
the same way that you assign values to character vectors (see “Assigning a
value to a character vector,” earlier in this chapter).
Imagine you want to create a named vector with the number of days in each
month. First, create a numeric vector containing the number of days in each month.
Then use the built-in dataset 
month.name
for the month names, as follows:
> month.days <- c(31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31)
> names(month.days) <- month.name
> month.days
January  February     March     April
31        28        31        30
May      June      July    August
31        30        31        31
September   October  November  December
30        31        30        31
Now you can use this vector to find the names of the months with 31 days:
> names(month.days[month.days==31])
[1] “January”  “March”    “May”
[4] “July”     “August”   “October”
[7] “December”
This technique works because you subset 
month.days
to return only those
values for which 
month.days
equals 
31
, and then you retrieve the names of the
resulting vector.
The double equal sign (
==
) indicates a test for equality (see Chapter 4).
Make sure not to use the single equal sign (
=
) for equality testing. Not only will
a single equal sign not work, but it can have strange side effects because R
interprets a single equal sign as an assignment. In other words, the operator 
=
in many cases is the same as 
<-
.
Manipulating Text
When you have text, you need to be able to manipulate it, for example by
splitting or combining words. You also may want to analyze your text to find out
whether it contains certain keywords or patterns.
In this section, you work with the string splitting and concatenation functions
of R. Concatenating (combining) strings is something that programmers do very
frequently. For example, when you create a report of your results, it’s customary to
combine descriptive text with the actual results of your analysis so that the reader
of your results can easily digest it.
Finally, you start to work with finding words and patterns inside text, and you
meet regular expressions, a powerful way of doing a wildcard search of text.
String theory: Combining and splitting strings
A collection of combined letters and words is called a string. Whenever you
work with text, you need to be able to concatenate words (string them together)
and split them apart. In R, you use the 
paste()
function to concatenate and the
strsplit()
function to split. In this section, we show you how to use both
functions.
Splitting text
First, create a character vector called 
pangram
, and assign it the value 
“The
quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”
, as follows:
> pangram <- “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”
> pangram
[1] “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”
To split this text at the word boundaries (spaces), you can use 
strsplit()
as
follows:
> strsplit(pangram, “ “)
[[1]]
[1] “The”   “quick” “brown” “fox”   “jumps” “over”  “the”   “lazy”  “dog”
Notice that the unusual first line of 
strsplit()
’s output consists of 
[[1]]
.
Similar to the way that R displays vectors, 
[[1]]
means that R is showing the
first element of a list. Lists are extremely important concepts in R; they allow
you to combine all kinds of variables. You can read more about lists in Chapter
7.
In the preceding example, this list has only a single element. Yes, that’s right:
The list has one element, but that element is a vector.
To extract an element from a list, you have to use double square brackets.
Split your 
pangram
into words, and assign the first element to a new variable called
words
, using double-square-brackets (
[[]]
) subsetting, as follows:
words <- strsplit(pangram, “ “)[[1]]
> words
[1] “The”   “quick” “brown” “fox”   “jumps” “over”  “the”   “lazy”  “dog”
To find the unique elements of a vector, including a vector of text, you use
the 
unique()
function. In the variable 
words
“the”
appears twice: once in
lowercase and once with the first letter capitalized. To get a list of the unique
words, first convert 
words
to lowercase and then use 
unique
:
> unique(tolower(words))
[1] “the”   “quick” “brown” “fox”   “jumps” “over”  “lazy”
[8] “dog”
Concatenating text
Now that you’ve split text, you can concatenate these elements so that they
again form a single text string.
Changing text case
To change some elements of 
words
to uppercase, use the 
toupper()
function:
toupper(words[c(4, 9)])
[1] “FOX” “DOG”
To change text to lowercase, use 
tolower()
:
> tolower(“Some TEXT in Mixed CASE”)
[1] “some text in mixed case”
To concatenate text, you use the 
paste()
function:
paste(“The”, “quick”, “brown”, “fox”)
[1] “The quick brown fox”
By default, 
paste()
uses a blank space to concatenate the vectors. In other
words, you separate elements with spaces. This is because 
paste()
takes an
argument that specifies the separator. The default for the 
sep
argument is a space
(
“ “
) — it defaults to separating elements with a blank space, unless you tell it
otherwise.
When you use 
paste()
, or any function that accepts multiple arguments,
make sure that you pass arguments in the correct format. Take a look at this
example, but notice that this time there is a 
c()
function in the code:
paste(c(“The”, “quick”, “brown”, “fox”))
[1] “The”   “quick” “brown” “fox”
What’s happening here? Why doesn’t 
paste()
paste the words together? The
reason is that, by using 
c()
, you passed a vector as a single argument to 
paste()
.
The 
c()
function combines elements into a vector. By default, 
paste()
concatenates separate vectors — it doesn’t collapse elements of a vector.
For the same reason, 
paste(words)
results in the following:
[1] “The”   “quick” “brown” “FOX”   “jumps” “over”  “the”   “lazy”  “DOG”
The 
paste()
function takes two optional arguments. The separator (
sep
)
argument controls how different vectors get concatenated, and the 
collapse
argument controls how a vector gets collapsed into itself, so to speak.
When you want to concatenate the elements of a vector by using 
paste()
, you
use the 
collapse
argument, as follows:
paste(words, collapse=” “)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested