how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Convert pdf to word searchable text Library software component asp.net windows web page mvc R%20dummies11-part971

[1] “The quick brown FOX jumps over the lazy DOG”
The 
collapse
argument of 
paste
can take any character value. If you want to
paste together text by using an underscore, use the following:
paste(words, collapse=”_”)
[1] “The_quick_brown_FOX_jumps_over_the_lazy_DOG”
You can use 
sep
and 
collapse
in the same 
paste
call. In this case, the vectors
are first pasted with 
sep
and then collapsed with 
collapse
. Try this:
> paste(LETTERS[1:5], 1:5, sep=”_”, collapse=”---”)
[1] “A_1---B_2---C_3---D_4---E_5”
What happens here is that you first concatenate the elements of each vector
with an underscore (that is, 
A_1
B_2
, and so on), and then you collapse the results
into a single string with 
---
between each element.
The 
paste()
function takes vectors as input and joins them together. If one
vector is shorter than the other, R recycles (repeats) the shorter vector to
match the length of the longer one — a powerful feature.
Suppose that you have five objects, and you want to label them 
“sample 1”
,
“sample 2”
, and so on. You can do this by passing a short vector with the value
sample
and a long vector with the values 
1:5
to 
paste()
. In this example, the
shorter vector is repeated five times:
> paste(“Sample”, 1:5)
[1] “Sample 1” “Sample 2” “Sample 3” “Sample 4” “Sample 5”
Sorting text
What do league tables, telephone directories, dictionaries, and the index
pages of a book have in common? They present data in some sorted manner. Data
can be sorted alphabetically or numerically, in ascending or descending order. Like
any programming language, R makes it easy to compile lists of sorted and ordered
data.
Convert pdf to word searchable text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select all text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf reader
Convert pdf to word searchable text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to make a pdf document text searchable; select text pdf file
Recycling character vectors
When you perform operations on vectors of different lengths, R automatically
adjusts the length of the shorter vector to match the longer one. This is
called recycling, since R recycles the element of the shorter vector to create
a new vector that matches the original long vector.
This feature is very powerful but can lead to confusion if you aren’t aware of
it.
The rules for recycling character vectors are exactly the same as for numeric
vectors (see Chapter 4).
Here are a few examples of vector recycling using 
paste
:
> paste(c(“A”, “B”), c(1, 2, 3, 4), sep=”-”)
[1] “A-1” “B-2” “A-3” “B-4”
> paste(c(“A”), c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5), sep=”-”)
[1] “A-1” “A-2” “A-3” “A-4” “A-5”
See how in the first example A and B get recycled to match the vector of
length four. In the second example, the single A also gets recycled — in this
case, five times.
Because text in R is represented as character vectors, you can sort these
vectors using the same functions as you use with numeric data. For example, to get
R to sort the alphabet in reverse, use the 
sort()
function:
> sort(letters, decreasing=TRUE)
[1] “z” “y” “x” “w” “v” “u” “t” “s” “r” “q” “p”
[12] “o” “n” “m” “l” “k” “j” “i” “h” “g” “f” “e”
[23] “d” “c” “b” “a”
Here you used the 
decreasing
argument of 
sort()
.
The 
sort()
function sorts a vector. It doesn’t sort the characters of each
element of the vector. In other words, 
sort()
doesn’t mangle the word itself.
You can still read each of the words in 
words
.
Try it on your vector 
words
that you created in the previous paragraph:
> sort(words)
[1] “brown” “DOG”   “FOX”   “jumps” “lazy”
[6] “over”  “quick” “the”   “The”
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
RasterEdge also provides other industry-leading methods to convert target PDF code, such as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word converter assembly
how to select text on pdf; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. RasterEdge.XDoc.Word. dll. ' pdf convert to txt DocumentConverter.ToDocument("C:\\test.pdf", "C
how to select text in pdf; search text in pdf image
R performs lexicographic sorting, as opposed to, for example, the C
language, which sorts in ASCII order. This means that the sort order will
depend on the locale of the machine the code runs on. In other words, the sort
order may be different if the machine running R is configured to use Danish
than it will if the machine is configured to use English. The R help file contains
this description:
Beware of making any assumptions about the collation order: e.g., in Estonian, Z
comes between S and T, and collation is not necessarily character-by-character —
in Danish aa sorts as a single letter, after z.
In most cases, lexicographic sorting simply means that the sort order is
independent of whether the string is in lowercase or uppercase. For more details,
read the help text in 
?sort
as well as 
?Comparison
.
You can get help on any function by typing a question mark followed by the
function name into the console. For other ways of getting help, refer to
Chapter 11.
Finding text inside text
When you’re working with text, often you can solve problems if you’re able to
find words or patterns inside text. Imagine you have a list of the states in the
United States, and you want to find out which of these states contains the word
New. Or, say you want to find out which state names consist of two words.
To solve the first problem, you need to search for individual words (in this
case, the word New). And to solve the second problem, you need to search for
multiple words. We cover both problems in this section.
Searching for individual words
To investigate this problem, you can use the built-in dataset 
states.names
,
which contains — you guessed it — the names of the states of the United States:
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
how to select text in pdf and copy; cannot select text in pdf file
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi Word text is searchable when users use Word text search
text searchable pdf; pdf search and replace text
> head(state.names)
[1] “Alabama”    “Alaska”     “Arizona”
[4] “Arkansas”   “California” “Colorado”
Broadly speaking, you can find substrings in text in two ways:
By position: For example, you can tell R to get three letters starting at position
5.
By pattern: For example, you can tell R to get substrings that match a specific
word or pattern.
A pattern is a bit like a wildcard. In some card games, you may use the
Joker card to represent any other card. Similarly, a pattern in R can contain words
or certain symbols with special meanings.
Searching by position
If you know the exact position of a subtext inside a text element, you use the
substr()
function to return the value. To extract the subtext that starts at the third
position and stops at the sixth position of 
state.name
, use the following:
> head(substr(state.name, start=3, stop=6))
[1] “abam” “aska” “izon” “kans” “lifo” “lora”
Searching by pattern
To find substrings, you can use the 
grep()
function, which takes two essential
arguments:
pattern
: The pattern you want to find.
x
: The character vector you want to search.
Suppose you want to find all the states that contain the pattern 
New
. Do it like
this:
> grep(“New”, state.name)
[1] 29 30 31 32
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
cannot select text in pdf; how to select all text in pdf file
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
and more companies are trying to convert printed business you are executing character and word recognition. Texts will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT
how to search text in pdf document; search pdf files for text
The result of 
grep()
is a numeric vector with the positions of each of the
elements that contain the matching pattern. In other words, the 29th element of
state.name
contains the word New.
> state.name[29]
New Hampshire
Phew, that worked! But typing in the position of each matching text is going to
be a lot of work. Fortunately, you can use the results of 
grep()
directly to subset
the original vector:
> state.name[grep(“New”, state.name)]
[1] “New Hampshire” “New Jersey”
[3] “New Mexico”    “New York”
The 
grep()
function is case sensitive — it only matches text in the same
case (uppercase or lowercase) as your search pattern. If you search for the
pattern “
new
” in lowercase, your search results are empty:
> state.name[grep(“new”, state.name)]
character(0)
Searching for multiple words
So, how do you find the names of all the states with more than one word? This
is easy when you realize that you can frame the question by finding all those states
that contain a space:
> state.name[grep(“ “, state.name)]
[1] “New Hampshire”  “New Jersey”
[3] “New Mexico”     “New York”
[5] “North Carolina” “North Dakota”
[7] “Rhode Island”   “South Carolina”
[9] “South Dakota”   “West Virginia”
The results include all the states that have two-word names, such as New
Jersey, New York, North Carolina, South Dakota, and West Virginia.
You can see from this list that there are no state names that contain East. You
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Best C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file.
select text in pdf reader; convert pdf to searchable text
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
search pdf for text in multiple files; pdf select text
can confirm this by doing another find:
> state.name[grep(“East”, state.name)]
character(0)
When the result of a character operation is an empty vector (that is, there
is nothing in it), R represents it as 
character(0)
. Similarly, an empty, or zero-
length, numeric vector is represented with 
integer(0)
or 
numeric(0)
(see
Chapter 4).
R makes a distinction between 
NULL
and an empty vector. 
NULL
usually
means something is undefined. This is subtly different from something that is
empty. For example, a character vector that happens to have no elements is
still a character vector, represented by 
character(0)
.
Getting a grip on grep
The name of the 
grep()
function originated in the Unix world. It’s an
acronym for Global Regular Expression Print. Regular expressions are a very
powerful way of expressing patterns of matching text, usually in a very
formal language. Whole books have been written about regular expressions.
We give a very short introduction in “Revving up with regular expressions,”
later in this chapter.
The function name 
grep()
appears in many programming languages that
deal with text and reporting. Perl, for example, is famous for its extensive
grep functionality. For more information, check out Perl For Dummies, 4th
Edition, by Paul Hoffman (Wiley).
Substituting text
The 
sub()
function (short for substitute) searches for a pattern in text and
replaces this pattern with replacement text. You use 
sub()
to substitute text for
text, and you use its cousin 
gsub()
to substitute all occurrences of a pattern. (The 
g
in 
gsub()
stands for global.)
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage One is that compared with HTML file, PDF file (a not be easily edited), is less searchable for search
find and replace text in pdf; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
library also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to
search pdf for text; search text in pdf image
Suppose you have the sentence He is a wolf in cheap clothing, which is clearly
a mistake. You can fix it with a 
gsub()
substitution. The 
gsub()
function takes
three arguments: the pattern to find, the replacement pattern, and the text to
modify:
> gsub(“cheap”, “sheep’s”, “A wolf in cheap clothing”)
[1] “A wolf in sheep’s clothing”
Another common type of problem that can be solved with text substitution is
removing substrings. Removing substrings is the same as replacing the substring
with empty text (that is, nothing at all).
Imagine a situation in which you have three file names in a vector:
file_a.csv
file_b.csv
, and 
file_c.csv
. Your task is to extract the 
a
b
, and 
c
from those file names. You can do this in two steps: First, replace the pattern
“file_”
with nothing, and then replace the 
“.csv”
with nothing. You’ll be left with
your desired vector:
> x <- c(“file_a.csv”, “file_b.csv”, “file_c.csv”)
> y <- gsub(“file_”, “”, x)
> y
[1] “a.csv” “b.csv” “c.csv”
> gsub(“.csv”, “”, y)
[1] “a” “b” “c”
In “Revving up with regular expressions,” later in this chapter, you see how
to perform these two substitutions in a single expression.
Revving up with regular expressions
Until this point, you’ve worked only with fixed expressions to find or substitute
text. This is useful but also limited. R supports the concept of regular expressions,
which allows you to search for patterns inside text.
Extending text functionality with stringr
After this quick tour through the text manipulation functions of R, you
probably wonder why all these functions have such unmemorable names and
seemingly diverse syntax. If so, you’re not alone. In fact, Hadley Wickham
wrote a package available from CRAN that simplifies and standardizes
working with text in R. This package is called 
stringr
, and you can install it
by using the R console or by choosing Tools⇒Install Packages in RStudio
(see Chapter 3).
Remember: Although you have to install a package only once, you have to
load it into the workspace using the 
library()
function every time you start
a new R session and plan to use the functions in that package.
install.packages(“stringr”)
library(stringr)
Here are some of the advantages of using 
stringr
rather than the standard
R functions:
Function names and arguments are consistent and more
descriptive. For example, all 
stringr
functions have names starting with
str_
(such as 
str_detect()
and 
str_replace()
).
stringr
has a more consistent way of dealing with cases with
missing data or empty values.
stringr
has a more consistent way of ensuring that input and
output data are of the same type.
The 
stringr
equivalent for 
grep()
is 
str_detect()
, and the equivalent for
gsub()
is 
str_replace_all()
.
As a starting point to explore 
stringr
, you may find some of these functions
useful:
str_detect()
: Detects the presence or absence of a pattern in a string
str_extract()
: Extracts the first piece of a string that matches a pattern
str_length()
: Returns the length of a string (in characters)
str_locate()
: Locates the position of the first occurrence of a pattern in
a string
str_match()
: Extracts the first matched group from a string
str_replace()
: Replaces the first occurrence of a matched pattern in a
string
str_split()
: Splits up a string into a variable number of pieces
str_sub()
: Extracts substrings from a character vector
str_trim()
: Trims white space from the start and end of string
str_wrap()
: Wraps strings into nicely formatted paragraphs
You may never have heard of regular expressions, but you’re probably familiar
with the broad concept. If you’ve ever used an 
*
or a 
?
to indicate any letter in a
word, then you’ve used a form of wildcard search. Regular expressions support the
idea of wildcards and much more.
Regular expressions allow three ways of making a search pattern more
general than a single, fixed expression:
Alternatives: You can search for instances of one pattern or another, indicated
by the 
|
symbol. For example 
beach|beech
matches both beach and beech.
On English and American English keyboards, you can usually find the | on
the same key as backslash (\).
Grouping: You group patterns together using parentheses 
( )
. For example you
write 
be(a|e)ch
to find both beach and beech.
Quantifiers: You specify whether an element in the pattern must be repeated
or not by adding 
*
(occurs zero or many times) or 
+
(occurs one or many times).
For example, to find either bach or beech (zero or more of a and e but not both),
you use 
b(e*|a*)ch
.
Try the following examples. First, create a new variable with five words:
> rwords <- c(“bach”, “back”, “beech”, “beach”, “black”)
Find either beach or beech using alternative matching:
> grep(“beach|beech”, rwords)
[1] 3 4
This means the search string was found in elements 3 and 4 of 
rwords
. To
extract the actual elements, you can use subsetting with square brackets:
> rwords[grep(“beach|beech”, rwords)]
[1] “beech” “beach”
Now use the grouping rule to extract the same words:
> rwords[grep(“be(a|e)ch”, rwords)]
[1] “beech” “beach”
Lastly, use the quantifier modification to extract bach and beech but not
beach:
rwords[grep(“b(e*|a*)ch”, rwords)]
[1] “bach”  “beech”
To find more help in R about regular expressions, look at the Help page 
?
regexp
. Some other great resources for learning more about regular
expressions are Wikipedia
(
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression
) and 
www.regular-
expressions.info
, where you can find a quick-start guide and tutorials.
Factoring in Factors
In real-world problems, you often encounter data that can be described using
words rather than numerical values. For example, cars can be red, green, or blue
(or any other color); people can be left-handed or right-handed, male or female;
energy can be derived from coal, nuclear, wind, or wave power. You can use the
term categorical data to describe these examples — or anything else that can be
classified in categories.
R has a special data structure for categorical data, called factors. Factors are
closely related to characters because any character vector can be represented by a
factor.
Factors are special types of objects in R. They’re neither character vectors nor
numeric vectors, although they have some attributes of both. Factors behave a
little bit like character vectors in the sense that the unique categories often are
text. Factors also behave a little bit like integer vectors because R encodes the
levels as integers.
Creating a factor
To create a factor in R, you use the 
factor()
function. The first three
arguments of 
factor()
warrant some exploration:
x
: The input vector that you want to turn into a factor.
levels
: An optional vector of the values that 
x
might have taken. The default is
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested