how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Converting pdf to searchable text format Library SDK component asp.net .net web page mvc R%20dummies13-part973

> startDate <- as.Date(“2012-01-01”)
> xm <- seq(startDate, by=”2 months”, length.out=6)
> xm
[1] “2012-01-01” “2012-03-01” “2012-05-01” “2012-07-01”
[5] “2012-09-01” “2012-11-01”
In addition to 
weekdays()
, you also can get R to report on 
months()
and
quarters()
:
> months(xm)
[1] “January”   “March”     “May”       “July”
[5] “September” “November”
> quarters(xm)
[1] “Q1” “Q1” “Q2” “Q3” “Q3” “Q4”
The results of many date functions, including 
weekdays()
and 
months()
depends on the 
locale
of the machine you’re working on. The locale describes
elements of international customization on a specific installation of R. This
includes date formats, language settings, and currency settings. To find out
some of the locale settings on your machine, use 
Sys.localeconv()
. R sets the
value of these variables at install time by interrogating the operating system
for details. You can change these settings at runtime or during the session
with 
Sys.setlocale()
.
To view the locale settings on your machine, try the following:
> Sys.localeconv()
Table 6-1 summarizes some useful functions for working with dates.
Table 6-1 Useful Functions with Dates
Converting pdf to searchable text format - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
find and replace text in pdf; how to select text in pdf reader
Converting pdf to searchable text format - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
select text in pdf; how to search pdf files for text
Function
Description
as.Date()
Converts character string to 
Date
weekdays()
Full weekday name in the current locale (for example, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday)
months()
Full month name in the current locale (for example, January, February, March)
quarters()
Quarter numbers (Q1, Q2, Q3, or Q4)
seq()
Generates dates sequences if you pass it a 
Date
object as its first argument
Presenting Dates in Different Formats
You’ve probably noticed that 
as.Date()
is fairly prescriptive in its defaults: It
expects the date to be formatted in the order of year, month, and day. Fortunately,
R allows you flexibility in specifying the date format.
By using the 
format
argument of 
as.Date()
, you can convert any date
format into a 
Date
object. For example, to convert “27 July 2012” into a date,
use the following:
> as.Date(“27 July 2012”, format=”%d %B %Y”)
[1] “2012-07-27”
This rather cryptic line of code indicates that the date format consists of the
day (
%d
), full month name (
%B
), and the year with century (
%Y
), with spaces
between each element.
Table 6-2 lists some of the many date formatting elements that you can use to
specify dates. You can access the full list by typing 
?strptime
in your R console.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file C# programming sample for PDF to text converting.
pdf find highlighted text; select text in pdf file
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical makes PDF document visible and searchable on the a C# programming example for converting PDF to HTML
pdf text searchable; pdf make text searchable
Table 6-2 Some Format Codes for Dates (For Use
with as.Date, POSXct, POSIXlt, and strptime)
Format
Description
%Y
Year with century.
%y
Year without century (00–99). Values 00 to 68 are prefixed by 20, and values 69 to 99 are
prefixed by 19.
%m
Month as decimal number (01–12).
%B
Full month name in the current locale. (Also matches abbreviated name on input.)
%b
Abbreviated month name in the current locale. (Also matches full name on input.)
%d
Day of the month as a decimal number (01–31). You don’t need to add the leading zero when
converting text to 
Date
, but when you format a 
Date
as text, R adds the leading zero.
%A
Full weekday name in the current locale. (Also matches abbreviated name on input.)
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
viewed and edited by converting documents and on artificial intelligence to extract text from documents and Texts will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT
pdf searchable text converter; how to select text in pdf image
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
VB.NET PDF Converter SDK for Converting PDF to HTML Webpage is that compared with HTML file, PDF file (a not be easily edited), is less searchable for search
how to make a pdf document text searchable; select text in pdf reader
%a
Abbreviated weekday name in the current locale. (Also matches full name on input.)
%w
Weekday as decimal number (0–6, with Sunday being 0).
Try the formatting codes with another common date format, “27/7/2012” (that
is, day, month, and year separated by a slash):
> as.Date(“27/7/12”, format=”%d/%m/%y”)
[1] “2012-07-27”
Adding Time Information to Dates
Often, referring only to dates isn’t enough. You also need to indicate a specific
time in hours and minutes.
To specify time information in addition to dates, you can choose between
two functions in R: 
as.POSIXct()
and 
as.POSIXlt()
. These two datetime
functions differ in the way that they store date information internally, as well
as in the way that you can extract date and time elements. (For more on these
two functions, see the nearby sidebar, “The two datetime functions.”)
POSIX is the name of a set of standards that refers to the UNIX operating
system. 
POSIXct
refers to a time that is internally stored as the number of
seconds since the start of 1970, by default. (You can modify the origin year by
setting the 
origin
argument to 
POSIXct()
.) 
POSIXlt
refers to a date stored as
a names list of vectors for the year, month, day, hours, and minutes.
According to Wikipedia, the time of the Apollo 11 moon landing was July 20,
1969, at 20:17:39 UTC. (UTC is the acronym for Coordinated Universal Time. It’s
how the world’s clocks are regulated.) To express this date and time in R, try the
following:
> apollo <- “July 20, 1969, 20:17:39”
> apollo.fmt <- “%B %d, %Y, %H:%M:%S”
> xct <- as.POSIXct(apollo, format=apollo.fmt, tz=”UTC”)
> xct
[1] “1969-07-20 20:17:39 UTC”
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without that compared to PDF document format, Word file This is an example for converting PDF to Word
search a pdf file for text; converting pdf to searchable text format
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Sample code for text to PDF converting in C# programming .
pdf searchable text; search text in multiple pdf
As you can see, 
as.POSIXct()
takes similar arguments to 
as.Date()
, but
you need to specify the date format as well as the time zone.
Table 6-3 lists additional formatting codes that are useful when working with
time information in dates.
Table 6-3 Formatting Codes for the Time Element of
POSIXct and POSIXlt Datetimes
Format
Description
%H
Hours as a decimal number (00–23)
%I
Hours as a decimal number (01–12)
%M
Minutes as a decimal number (00–59)
%S
Seconds as a decimal number (00–61)
%p
AM/PM indicator
The two datetime functions
In most computer languages and systems, dates are represented by numeric
VB.NET Word: .NET Word to SVG Converter Control; Convert Word to
an editable image format) can be more searchable for Google The converting process is not complicated: open a Word For instance, this VB.NET PDF to SVG library
cannot select text in pdf file; find and replace text in pdf file
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Online demo allows converting tiff to PDF online. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.TIFF.dll
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; text select tool pdf
values that indicate the number of seconds since a specific instant in time
(known as the epoch).
In R, you can use two functions to work with datetime objects: 
POSIXct()
and 
POSIXlt()
. These functions create objects of class 
POSIXct
and 
POSIXlt
,
respectively:
POSIXct
objects represents the (signed) number of seconds since the
beginning of 1970 (in the UTC time zone) as a numeric vector.
POSIXlt
objects are named lists of vectors representing nine elements of
a datetime (
sec
min
hour
, and so on).
Because 
POSIXct
are numbers, and 
POSIXlt 
objects are lists, 
POSIXct
objects
requires less memory.
The following table summarizes the main differences between the different
datetime classes in R.
Class
Description
Useful
Functions
Date
Calendar date
as.Date()
POSIXct
The number of seconds since the beginning of 1970 (in the
UTC time zone) as a numeric vector
as.POSIXct()
POSIXlt
A named list of vectors representing nine elements (
sec
min
,
hour
, and so on)
as.POSIXlt()
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to HTML in C#.NET
original formatting and interrelation of text and graphical PowerPoint document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PowerPoint document
how to search a pdf document for text; how to search text in pdf document
C# Word - Convert Word to HTML in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Besides, this Word converting library also makes Word document visible and searchable on the
pdf text select tool; search multiple pdf files for text
Formatting Dates and Times
To format a date for pretty printing, you use 
format()
, which takes a 
POSIXct
or
POSIXlt
datetime as input, together with a formatting string. You already have
encountered a formatting string when creating a date.
Continuing with the example where the object 
xct
is the day and time of the
Apollo landing, you can format this date and time in many different ways. For
examples, to format it as 
DD/MM/YY
, try:
> format(xct, “%d/%m/%y”)
[1] “20/07/69”
In addition to the formatting codes, you can use any other character. If you
want to format the 
xct
datetime as a sentence, try the following:
> format(xct, “%S minutes past %I %p, on %d %B %Y”)
[1] “39 minutes past 08 PM, on 20 July 1969”
You can find the formatting codes in Table 6-2 and Table 6-3, as well as at
the Help page 
?strptime
.
Performing Operations on Dates and Times
Because R stores datetime objects as numbers, you can do various operations
on dates, including addition, subtraction, comparison, and extraction.
Addition and subtraction
Because R stores objects of class 
POSIXct
as the number of seconds since the
epoch (usually the start of 1970), you can do addition and subtraction by adding or
subtracting seconds. It’s more common to add or subtract days from dates, so it’s
useful to know that each day has 86,400 seconds.
> 24*60*60
[1] 86400
So, to add seven days to the Apollo moon landing date, use addition, just
remember to multiply the number of days by the number of seconds per day:
> xct + 7*86400
[1] “1969-07-27 20:17:39 UTC”
After you know that you can convert any duration to seconds, you can add or
subtract any value to a datetime object. For example, add three hours to the time
of the Apollo moon landing:
> xct + 3*60*60
[1] “1969-07-20 23:17:39 UTC”
Similarly, to get a date seven days earlier, use subtraction:
> xct - 7*86400
[1] “1969-07-13 20:17:39 UTC”
There is an important difference between 
Date
objects and 
POSIXct
or
POSIXlt
objects. If you use a 
Date
object, you add and subtract days; with
POSIXct
and 
POSIXlt
, the operations add or subtract only seconds.
Try that yourself, first converting 
xct
to a 
Date
object, then subtracting 7:
> as.Date(xct) - 7
[1] “1969-07-13”
Comparison of dates
Similar to the way that you can add or subtract states you can also compare
dates with the comparison operators, such as less than (
<
) or greater than (
>
),
covered in Chapter 5.
Say you want to compare the current time with any fixed time. In R, you use
the 
Sys.time()
function to get the current system time:
> Sys.time()
[1] “2012-03-24 10:12:52 GMT”
Now you know the exact time when we wrote this sentence. Clearly when you
try the same command you will get a different result!
Now you can compare your current system time with the time of the Apollo
landing:
> Sys.time() < xct
[1] FALSE
If your system clock is accurate, then obviously you would expect the result to
be false, because the moon landing happened more than 40 years ago.
As we cover in Chapter 5, the comparison operators are vectorized, so you can
compare an entire vector of dates with the moon landing date. Try to use all your
knowledge of dates, sequences of dates, and comparison operators to compare the
start of several decades to the moon landing date.
Start by creating a 
POSIXct
object containing the first day of 1950. Then use
seq()
to create a sequence with intervals of ten years:
> dec.start <- as.POSIXct(“1950-01-01”)
> dec <- seq(dec.start, by=”10 years”, length.out=4)
> dec
[1] “1950-01-01 GMT” “1960-01-01 GMT” “1970-01-01 GMT”
[4] “1980-01-01 GMT”
Finally, you can compare your new vector 
dec
with the moon landing date:
> dec > xct
[1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
As you can see, the first two results (comparing to 1950 and 1960) are 
FALSE
,
and the last two values (comparing to 1970 and 1980) are 
TRUE
.
Extraction
Another thing you may want to do is to extract specific elements of the date,
such as the day, month, or year. For example, scientists may want to compare the
weather in a specific month (say, January) for many different years. To do this,
they first have to determine the month, by extracting the months from the
datetime object.
An easy way to achieve this is to work with dates in the 
POSIXlt
class,
because this type of data is stored internally as a named list, which enables you to
extract elements by name. To do this, first convert the 
Date
class:
> xlt <- as.POSIXlt(xct)
> xlt
[1] “1969-07-20 20:17:39 UTC”
Next, use the 
$
operator to extract the different elements. For example, to get
the year, use the following:
> xlt$year
[1] 69
And to get the month, use the following:
> xlt$mon
[1] 6
You can use the 
unclass()
function to expose the internal structure of
POSIXlt
objects.
> unclass(xlt)
If you run this line of code, you’ll see that 
POSIXlt
objects are really just
named lists. You get to work with lists in much more detail in Chapter 7.
More date and time fun(ctionality)
In this chapter, we barely scratch the surface on how to handle dates and
times in R. You may want to explore additional functionality available in R
and add-on packages by looking at the following:
chron
: In addition to all the data classes that we cover in this chapter, R
has a 
chron
class for datetime objects that don’t have a time zone. To
investigate this class, first load the 
chron
package with 
library(chron)
and
then read the Help file 
?chron
.
lubridate
: You can download the add-on package 
lubridate
from
CRAN. This package provides many functions to make it easier to work with
dates. You can download and find more information at 
http://cran.r-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested