how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to search a pdf document for text SDK application API .net html windows sharepoint R%20dummies14-part974

project.org/web/packages/lubridate/index.html
.
R also has very good support for objects that represent time series data.
Time series data usually refers to information that was recorded at fixed
intervals, such as days, months, or years:
ts
: In R, you use the 
ts()
function to create time series objects. These
are vector or matrix objects that contain information about the observations,
together with information about the start, frequency, and end of each
observation period. With 
ts
class data you can use powerful R functions to do
modeling and forecasting — for example, a
rima()
is a general model for time
series data.
zoo
and 
xts
: The add-on package 
zoo
extends time series objects by
allowing observations that don’t have such strictly fixed intervals. You can
download it from CRAN at 
http://cran.r-
project.org/web/packages/zoo/index.html
. The add-on package 
xts
provides additional extensions to time series data and builds on the
functionality of 
ts
as well as 
zoo
objects. You can download 
xts
at CRAN:
http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/xts/index.html
.
Now you have all the information to go on a date with R and enjoy the
experience!
How to search a pdf document for text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf search and replace text; how to select text in a pdf
How to search a pdf document for text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf text search tool; searching pdf files for text
Chapter 7
Working in More Dimensions
In This Chapter
Creating matrices
Getting values in and out of a matrix
Using row and column names in a matrix
Performing matrix calculations
Working with multidimensional arrays
Putting your data in a data frame
Getting data in and out of a data frame
Working with lists
In the previous chapters, you worked with one-dimensional vectors. The data
could be represented by a single row or column in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet.
But often you need more than one dimension. Many calculations in statistics are
based on matrices, so you need to be able to represent them and perform matrix
calculations. Many datasets contain values of different types for multiple variables
and observations, so you need a two-dimensional table to represent this data. In
Excel, you would do that in a spreadsheet; in R, you use a specific object called a
data frame for the task.
Adding a Second Dimension
In the previous chapters, you constructed vectors to hold series of data in a
one-dimensional structure. In addition to vectors, R can represent matrices as an
object you work and calculate with. In fact, R really shines when it comes to matrix
calculations and operations. In this section, we take a closer look at the magic you
can do with them.
Discovering a new dimension
Vectors are closely related to a bigger class of objects, arrays. Arrays have two
very important features:
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
find text in pdf image; pdf select text
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
how to select all text in pdf file; select text pdf file
They contain only a single type of value.
They have dimensions.
The dimensions of an array determine the type of the array. You know already
that a vector has only one dimension. An array with two dimensions is a matrix.
Anything with more than two dimensions is simply called an array. You find a
graphical representation of this in Figure 7-1.
Technically, a vector has no dimensions at all in R. If you use the functions
dim()
nrow()
, or 
ncol()
, mentioned in the “Looking at the properties” section,
later in this chapter, with a vector as argument, R returns 
NULL
as a result.
Figure 7-1: A vector, a matrix, and an array.
Creating your first matrix
Creating a matrix is almost as easy as writing the word: You simply use the
matrix()
function. You do have to give R a little bit more information, though. R
needs to know which values you want to put in the matrix and how you want to put
them in. The 
matrix()
function has a couple arguments to control this:
data
is a vector of values you want in the matrix.
ncol
takes a single number that tells R how many columns you want.
nrow
takes a single number that tells R how many rows you want.
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
find text in pdf files; search pdf for text
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
search pdf documents for text; how to select text in pdf
byrow
takes a logical value that tells R whether you want to fill the matrix row-
wise (
TRUE
) or column-wise (
FALSE
). Column-wise is the default.
So, the following code results in a matrix with the numbers 1 through 12, in
four columns and three rows.
> first.matrix <- matrix(1:12, ncol=4)
> first.matrix
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    4    7   10
[2,]    2    5    8   11
[3,]    3    6    9   12
You don’t have to specify both 
ncol
and 
nrow
. If you specify one, R will
know automatically what the other needs to be.
Alternatively, if you want to fill the matrix row by row, you can do so:
> matrix(1:12, ncol=4, byrow=TRUE)
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    2    3    4
[2,]    5    6    7    8
[3,]    9   10   11   12
Looking at the properties
You can look at the structure of an object using the 
str()
function. If you
do that for your first matrix, you get the following result:
> str(first.matrix)
int [1:3, 1:4] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
This looks remarkably similar to the output for a vector, with the difference
that R gives you both the indices for the rows and for the columns. If you want the
number of rows and columns without looking at the structure, you can use the
dim()
function.
> dim(first.matrix)
[1] 3 4
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
cannot select text in pdf; search pdf for text in multiple files
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
will guide you how to replace text in specified PDF page. 'Open a document Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) 'Set the search options Dim
how to make pdf text searchable; text searchable pdf
To get only the number of rows, you use the 
nrow()
function. The 
ncol()
function gives you the number of columns of a matrix.
You can find the total number of values in a matrix exactly the same way as
you do with a vector, using the 
length()
function:
> length(first.matrix)
[1] 12
Actually, if you look at the output of the 
str()
function, that matrix looks
very much like a vector. That’s because, internally, it’s a vector with a small
extra piece of information that tells R the dimensions (see the nearby sidebar,
“Playing with attributes”). You can use this property of matrices in calculations,
as you’ll see further in this chapter.
Playing with attributes
Both the names and the dimensions of matrices and arrays are stored in R as
attributes of the object. These attributes can be seen as labeled values you
can attach to any object. They form one of the mechanisms R uses to define
specific object types like dates, time series, and so on. They can include any
kind of information, and you can use them yourself to add information to any
object.
To see all the attributes of an object, you can use the 
attributes()
function.
You can see all the attributes of 
my.array
like this:
> attributes(my.array)
$dim
[1] 3 4 2
This function returns a named list, where each item in the list is an attribute.
Each attribute can, on itself, be a list again. For example, the attribute
dimnames
is actually a list containing the row and column names of a matrix.
You can check that for yourself by checking the output of
attributes(baskets.team)
. You can set all attributes as a named list as well.
You find examples of that in the Help file 
?attributes
.
To get or set a single attribute, you can use the 
attr()
function. This
function takes two important arguments. The first argument is the object you
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
pdf find and replace text; how to select text on pdf
C# PDF Text Highlight Library: add, delete, update PDF text
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text highlight function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
how to make a pdf file text searchable; search pdf files for text
want to examine, and the second argument is the name of the attribute you
want to see or change. If the attribute you ask for doesn’t exist, R simply
returns 
NULL
.
Imagine you want to add which season Granny and Geraldine scored the
baskets mentioned in 
baskets.team
. You can do this with the following code:
> attr(baskets.team,’season’) <- ‘2010-2011’
To get the value of this attribute returned, you can then use following code:
> attr(baskets.team,’season’)
[1] “2010-2011”
You can delete attributes again by setting their value to 
NULL
, like this:
> attr(baskets.team,’season’) <- NULL
Combining vectors into a matrix
In Chapter 4, you created two vectors that contain the number of baskets
Granny and Geraldine made in the six games of this basketball season. It would be
nicer, though, if the number of baskets for the whole team were contained in one
object. With matrices, this becomes possible. You can combine both vectors as two
rows of a matrix with the 
rbind()
function, like this:
> baskets.of.Granny <- c(12,4,5,6,9,3)
> baskets.of.Geraldine <- c(5,4,2,4,12,9)
> baskets.team <- rbind(baskets.of.Granny, baskets.of.Geraldine)
If you look at the object 
baskets.team
, you get a nice matrix. As an extra, the
rows take the names of the original vectors. You work with these names in the
next section.
> baskets.team
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
baskets.of.Granny      12    4    5    6    9    3
baskets.of.Geraldine    5    4    2    4   12    9
The 
cbind()
function does something similar. It binds the vectors as columns
of a matrix, as in the following example.
> cbind(1:3, 4:6, matrix(7:12, ncol=2))
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    4    7   10
[2,]    2    5    8   11
[3,]    3    6    9   12
Here you bind together three different nameless objects:
A vector with the values 1 to 3 (
1:3
)
A vector with the values 4 to 6 (
4:6
)
A matrix with two columns and three rows, filled column-wise with the values 7
through 12 (
matrix(7:12, ncol=2)
)
This example shows some other properties of 
cbind()
and 
rbind()
that can be
very useful:
The functions work with both vectors and matrices. They also work on other
objects, as shown in the “Manipulating Values in a Data Frame” section, later in
this chapter.
You can give more than two arguments to either function. The vectors and
matrices are combined in the order they’re given.
You can combine different types of objects, as long as the dimensions fit. Here
you combine vectors and matrices in one function call.
Using the Indices
If you look at the output of the code in the previous section, you’ll probably
notice the brackets you used in the previous chapters for accessing values in
vectors through the indices. But this time, these indices look a bit different. Where
a vector has only one dimension that can be indexed, a matrix has two. The indices
for both dimensions are separated by a comma. The index for the row is given
before the comma; the index for the column, after it.
Extracting values from a matrix
You can use these indices the same way you use vectors in Chapter 4. You can
assign and extract values, use numerical or logical indices, drop values by using a
minus sign, and so forth.
Using numeric indices
For example, you can extract the values in the first two rows and the last two
columns with the following code:
> first.matrix[1:2, 2:3]
[,1] [,2]
[1,]    4    7
[2,]    5    8
R returns you a matrix again. Pay attention to the indices of this new matrix —
they’re not the indices of the original matrix anymore.
R gives you an easy way to extract complete rows and columns from a matrix.
You simply don’t specify the other dimension. So, you get the second and third row
from your first matrix like this:
> first.matrix[2:3,]
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    5    8   11
[2,]    3    6    9   12
Dropping values using negative indices
In Chapter 4, you drop values in a vector by using a negative value for the
index. This little trick works perfectly well with matrices, too. So, you can get all
the values except the second row and third column of 
first.matrix
like this:
> first.matrix[-2,-3]
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    4   10
[2,]    3    6   12
With matrices, a negative index always means: “Drop the complete row or
column.” If you want to drop only the element at the second row and the third
column, you have to treat the matrix like a vector. So, in this case, you drop the
second element in the third column like this:
> nr <- nrow(first.matrix)
> id <- nr*2+2
> first.matrix[-id]
[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  9 10 11 12
This returns a vector, because the 11 remaining elements don’t fit into a
matrix anymore. Now what happened here exactly? Remember that matrices are
read column-wise. To get the second element in the third column, you need to do
the following:
1. Count the number of rows, using 
nrow()
, and store that in a
variable — for example 
nr
.
You don’t have to do this, but it makes the code easier to read.
2. Count two columns and then add 2 to get the second element in
the third column.
Again store this result in a variable (for example, 
id
).
3. Use the one-dimensional vector extraction 
[]
to drop this value, as
shown in Chapter 4.
You can do this in one line, like this:
> first.matrix[-(2 * nrow(first.matrix) + 2)]
[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  9 10 11 12
This is just one example of how you can work with indices while treating a
matrix like a vector. It requires a bit of thinking at first, but tricks like these can
offer very neat solutions to more complex problems as well, especially if you need
your code to run as fast as possible.
Juggling dimensions
As with vectors, you can combine multiple numbers in the indices. If you want
to drop the first and third rows of the matrix, you can do so like this:
> first.matrix[-c(1, 3), ]
[1]  2  5  8 11
Wait a minute. . . . There’s only one index. R doesn’t return a matrix here — it
returns a vector!
By default, R always tries to simplify the objects to the smallest number of
dimensions possible when you use the brackets to extract values from an
array. So, if you ask for only one column or row, R will make that a vector by
dropping a dimension.
You can force R to keep all dimensions by using the extra argument 
drop
from
the indexing function. To get the second row returned as a matrix, you do the
following:
> first.matrix[2, , drop=FALSE]
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    5    8   11
This seems like utter magic, but it’s not that difficult. You have three positions
now between the brackets, all separated by commas. The first position is the row
index. The second position is the column index. But then what?
Actually, the square brackets work like a function, and the row index and
column index are arguments for the square brackets. Now you add an extra
argument 
drop
with the value 
FALSE
. As you do with any other function, you
separate the arguments by commas. Put all this together, and you have the code
shown here.
The default dropping of dimensions of R can be handy, but it’s famous for
being overlooked as well. It can cause serious mishap if you aren’t aware of it.
Particularly in code where you take a subset of a matrix, you can easily forget
about the case where only one row or column is selected.
Replacing values in a matrix
Replacing values in a matrix is done in a very similar way to replacing values
in a vector. To replace the value in the second row and third column of
first.matrix
with 
4
, you use the following code.
> first.matrix[3, 2] <- 4
> first.matrix
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    4    7   10
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested