how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Select text in pdf file SDK application API .net html windows sharepoint R%20dummies15-part975

[2,]    2    5    8   11
[3,]    3    4    9   12
You also can change an entire row or column of values by not specifying the
other dimension. Note that values are recycled, so to change the second row to the
sequence 
1
3
1
3
, you can simply do the following:
> first.matrix[2, ] <- c(1,3)
> first.matrix
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    4    7   10
[2,]    1    3    1    3
[3,]    3    4    9   12
You also can replace a subset of values within the matrix by another matrix.
You don’t even have to specify the values as a matrix — a vector will do. Take a
look at the result of the following code:
> first.matrix[1:2, 3:4] <- c(8,4,2,1)
> first.matrix
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    4    8    2
[2,]    1    3    4    1
[3,]    3    4    9   12
Here you change the values in the first two rows and the last two columns to
the numbers 
8
4
2
, and 
1
.
R reads and writes matrices column-wise by default. So, if you put a vector
in a matrix or a subset of a matrix, it will be put in column-wise regardless of
the method. If you want to do this row-wise, you first have to construct a
matrix with the values using the argument 
byrow=TRUE
. Then you use this
matrix instead of the original vector to insert the values.
Naming Matrix Rows and Columns
The 
rbind()
function conveniently added the names of the vectors
baskets.of.Granny
and 
baskets.of.Geraldine
to the rows of the matrix
baskets.team
in the previous section. You name the values in a vector inChapter 5,
and you can do something very similar with rows and columns in a matrix.
For that, you have the functions 
rownames()
and 
colnames()
. Guess which one
Select text in pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to select all text in pdf; convert pdf to searchable text online
Select text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf text search; search pdf files for text programmatically
does what? Both functions work much like the 
names()
function you use when
naming vector values. So, let’s check what you can do with these functions.
Changing the row and column names
The matrix 
baskets.team
from the previous section already has some row
names. It would be better if the names of the rows would just read 
‘Granny’
and
‘Geraldine’
. You can easily change these row names like this:
> rownames(baskets.team) <- c(‘Granny’,’Geraldine’)
You can look at the matrix to check if this did what it’s supposed to do, or you
can take a look at the row names itself like this:
> rownames(baskets.team)
[1] “Granny”    “Geraldine”
The 
colnames()
function works exactly the same. You can, for example, add
the number of the game as a column name using the following code:
> colnames(baskets.team) <- c(‘1st’,’2nd’,’3th’,’4th’,’5th’,’6th’)
This gives you the following matrix:
> baskets.team
1st 2nd 3th 4th 5th 6th
Granny     12   4    5   6   9   3
Geraldine   5   4    2   4  12   9
This is almost like you want it, but the third column name contains an
annoying writing mistake. No problem there, R allows you to easily correct that
mistake. Just as the with 
names()
function, you can use indices to extract or to
change a specific row or column name. You can correct the mistake in the column
names like this:
> colnames(baskets.team)[3] <- ‘3rd’
If you want to get rid of either column names or row names, the only thing
you need to do is set their value to 
NULL
. This also works for vector names, by
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
search text in pdf image; make pdf text searchable
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
pdf find text; can't select text in pdf file
the way. You can try that out yourself on a copy of the matrix 
baskets.team
like this:
> baskets.copy <- baskets.team
> colnames(baskets.copy) <- NULL
> baskets.copy
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
Granny      12    4    5    6    9    3
Geraldine    5    4    2    4   12    9
The row and column names are stored in an attribute called 
dimnames
. To
get to the value of that attribute, you can use the 
dimnames()
function to
extract or set those values. (See the “Playing with attributes” sidebar, earlier
in this chapter, for more information.)
Using names as indices
This naming thing looks remarkably similar to what you can read about
naming vectors in Chapter 5. You can use names instead of the index number to
select values from a vector. This works for matrices as well, using the row and
column names.
Say you want to select the second and the fifth game for both ladies. You can
do so using the following code:
> baskets.team[, c(“2nd”,”5th”)]
2nd 5th
Granny      4   9
Geraldine   4  12
Exactly as before, you get all rows if you don’t specify which ones you want.
Alternatively, you can extract all the results for Granny like this:
> baskets.team[“Granny”,]
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th
12   4   5   6   9   3
That’s the result, indeed, but the row name is gone now. As explained in the
“Juggling dimensions” section, earlier in this chapter, R tries to simplify the matrix
to a vector, if that’s possible. In this case, a single row is returned so, by default,
this is transformed to a vector.
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
select text pdf file; how to select all text in pdf
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Enable users abilities to adjust color and transparency while scraping text from PDF file. Able to redact selected text in PDF document.
how to make pdf text searchable; pdf searchable text
If a one-row matrix is simplified to a vector, the column names are used as
names for the values. If a one-column matrix is simplified to a vector, the row
names are used as names for the vector.
Calculating with Matrices
Probably the strongest feature of R is its capability to deal with complex matrix
operations in an easy and optimized way. Because much of statistics boils down to
matrix operations, it’s only natural that R loves to crunch those numbers.
Using standard operations with matrices
When talking about operations on matrices, you can treat either the elements
of the matrix or the whole matrix as the value you operate on. That difference is
pretty clear when you compare, for example, transposing a matrix and adding a
single number (or scalar) to a matrix. When transposing, you work with the whole
matrix. When adding a scalar to a matrix, you add that scalar to every element of
the matrix.
You add a scalar to a matrix simply by using the addition operator, 
+
, like this:
> first.matrix + 4
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    5    8   11   14
[2,]    6    9   12   15
[3,]    7   10   13   16
You can use all other arithmetic operators in exactly the same way to perform
an operation on all elements of a matrix.
The difference between operations on matrices and elements becomes less
clear if you talk about adding matrices together. In fact, the addition of two
matrices is the addition of the responding elements. So, you need to make sure
both matrices have the same dimensions.
Let’s look at another example: Say you want to add 1 to the first row, 2 to the
second row, and 3 to the third row of the matrix 
first.matrix
. You can do this by
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
text searchable pdf; how to select text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
search text in pdf image; cannot select text in pdf file
constructing a matrix 
second.matrix
that has four columns and three rows and that
has 
1
2
, and 
3
as values in the first, second, and third rows, respectively. The
following command does so using the recycling of the first argument by the matrix
function (see Chapter 4):
> second.matrix <- matrix(1:3, nrow=3, ncol=4)
With the addition operator, you can add both matrices together, like this:
> first.matrix + second.matrix
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    5    8   11
[2,]    4    7   10   13
[3,]    6    9   12   15
This is the solution your math teacher would approve of if she asked you to do
the matrix addition of the first and second matrix. And even more, if the
dimensions of both matrices are not the same, R will complain and refuse to carry
out the operation, as shown in the following example:
> first.matrix + second.matrix[,1:3]
Error in first.matrix + second.matrix[, 1:3] : non-conformable arrays
But what would happen if instead of adding a matrix, we added a vector? Take
a look at the outcome of the following code:
> first.matrix + 1:3
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    5    8   11
[2,]    4    7   10   13
[3,]    6    9   12   15
Not only does R not complain about the dimensions, but it recycles the vector
over the values of the matrices. In fact, R treats the matrix as a vector in this case
by simply ignoring the dimensions. So, in this case, you don’t use matrix addition
but simple (vectorized) addition (see Chapter 4).
By default, R fills matrices column-wise. Whenever R reads a matrix, it also
reads it column-wise. This has important implications for the work with
matrices. If you don’t stay aware of this, R can bite you in the leg nastily.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online, convert CSV to save signatures to OpenOffice and CSV file. Viewer particular text tool can select text on all
convert pdf to word searchable text; select text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
pdf find and replace text; cannot select text in pdf
Calculating row and column summaries
In Chapter 4, you summarize vectors using functions like 
sum()
and 
prod()
. All
these functions work on matrices as well, because a matrix is simply a vector with
dimensions attached to it. You also can summarize the rows or columns of a matrix
using some specialized functions.
In the previous section, you created a matrix 
baskets.team
with the number of
baskets that both Granny and Geraldine made in the previous basketball season.
To get the total number each woman made during the last six games, you can use
the function 
rowSums()
like this:
> rowSums(baskets.team)
Granny Geraldine
39        36
The 
rowSums()
function returns a named vector with the sums of each row.
You can get the means of each row with 
rowMeans()
, and the respective
sums and means of each columns with 
colSums()
and 
colMeans()
.
Doing matrix arithmetic
Apart from the classical arithmetic operators, R contains a large set of
operators and functions to perform a wide set of matrix operations. Many of these
operations are used in advanced mathematics, so you may never need them. Some
of them can come in pretty handy, though, if you need to flip around data or you
want to calculate some statistics yourself.
Transposing a matrix
Flipping around a matrix so the rows become columns and vice versa is very
easy in R. The 
t()
function (which stands for transpose) does all the work for you:
> t(first.matrix)
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    2    3
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
find and replace text in pdf; search pdf for text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Default create. Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page.
searching pdf files for text; pdf find text
[2,]    4    5    6
[3,]    7    8    9
[4,]   10   11   12
You can try this with a vector, too. As matrices are read and filled column-
wise, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the 
t()
function sees a vector as a one-
column matrix. The transpose of a vector is, thus, a one-row matrix:
> t(1:10)
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9    10
You can tell this is a matrix by the dimensions. This information seems trivial
by the way, but imagine you’re selecting only one row from a matrix and
transposing it. Unlike what you would expect, you get a row instead of a column:
> t(first.matrix[2,])
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    5    8   11
Inverting a matrix
Contrary to your intuition, inverting a matrix is not done by raising it to the
power of –1. As explained in Chapter 6, R normally applies the arithmetic operators
element-wise on the matrix. So, the command 
first.matrix^(-1)
doesn’t give you
the inverse of the matrix; instead, it gives you the inverse of the elements. To
invert a matrix, you use the 
solve()
function, like this:
> square.matrix <- matrix(c(1,0,3,2,2,4,3,2,1),ncol=3)
> solve(square.matrix)
[,1]       [,2]       [,3]
[1,]  0.5 -0.8333333  0.1666667
[2,] -0.5  0.6666667  0.1666667
[3,]  0.5 -0.1666667 -0.1666667
Be careful inverting a matrix like this because of the risk of round-off errors.
R computes most statistics based on decompositions like the QR
decomposition, single-value decomposition, and Cholesky decomposition. You
can do that yourself using the functions 
qr()
svd()
, and 
chol()
, respectively.
Check the respective Help pages for more information.
Multiplying two matrices
The multiplication operator (
*
) works element-wise on matrices. To calculate
the inner product of two matrices, you use the special operator 
%*%
, like this:
> first.matrix %*% t(second.matrix)
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]   22   44   66
[2,]   26   52   78
[3,]   30   60   90
You have to transpose the 
second.matrix
first; otherwise, both matrices have
non-conformable dimensions. Multiplying a matrix with a vector is a bit of a special
case; as long as the dimensions fit, R will automatically convert the vector to either
a row or a column matrix, whatever is applicable in that case. You can check for
yourself in the following example:
> first.matrix %*% 1:4
[,1]
[1,]   70
[2,]   80
[3,]   90
> 1:3 %*% first.matrix
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]   14   32   50   68
Adding More Dimensions
Both vectors and matrices are special cases of a more general type of object,
arrays. All arrays can be seen as a vector with an extra dimension attribute, and
the number of dimensions is completely arbitrary. Although arrays with more than
two dimensions are not often used in R, it’s good to know of their existence. They
can be useful in certain cases, like when you want to represent two-dimensional
data in a time series or store multi-way tables in R.
Creating an array
You have two different options for constructing matrices or arrays. Either you
use the creator functions 
matrix()
and 
array()
, or you simply change the
dimensions using the 
dim()
function.
Using the creator functions
You can create an array easily with the 
array()
function, where you give the
data as the first argument and a vector with the sizes of the dimensions as the
second argument. The number of dimension sizes in that argument gives you the
number of dimensions. For example, you make an array with four columns, three
rows, and two “tables” like this:
> my.array <- array(1:24, dim=c(3,4,2))
> my.array
, , 1
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    1    4    7   10
[2,]    2    5    8   11
[3,]    3    6    9   12
, , 2
[,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]   13   16   19   22
[2,]   14   17   20   23
[3,]   15   18   21   24
This array has three dimensions. Notice that, although the rows are given as
the first dimension, the tables are filled column-wise. So, for arrays, R fills the
columns, then the rows, and then the rest.
Changing the dimensions of a vector
Alternatively, you could just add the dimensions using the 
dim()
function. This
is a little hack that goes a bit faster than using the 
array()
function; it’s especially
useful if you have your data already in a vector. (This little trick also works for
creating matrices, by the way, because a matrix is nothing more than an array with
only two dimensions.)
Say you already have a vector with the numbers 1 through 24, like this:
> my.vector <- 1:24
You can easily convert that vector to an array exactly like 
my.array
simply by
assigning the dimensions, like this:
> dim(my.vector) <- c(3,4,2)
If you check how 
my.vector
looks like now, you see there is no difference from
the array 
my.array
that you created before.
You can check whether two objects are identical by using the 
identical()
function. To check, for example, whether 
my.vector
and 
my.array
are
identical, you simply do the following:
> identical(my.array, my.vector)
[1] TRUE
Using dimensions to extract values
Extracting values from an array with any number of dimensions is completely
equivalent to extracting values from a matrix. You separate the dimension indices
you want to retrieve with commas, and if necessary you can use the 
drop
argument
exactly as you do with matrices. For example, to get the value from the second row
and third column of the first table of 
my.array
, you simply do the following:
> my.array[2,3,1]
[1] 8
If you want the third column of the second table as an array, you use the
following code:
> my.array[, 3, 2, drop=FALSE]
, , 1
[,1]
[1,]   19
[2,]   20
[3,]   21
If you don’t specify the 
drop=FALSE
argument, R will try to simplify the
object as much as possible. This also means that if the result has only two
dimensions, R will make it a matrix. The following code returns a matrix that
consists of the second row of each table:
> my.array[2, , ]
[,1] [,2]
[1,]    2   14
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested