how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Text searchable pdf Library control class asp.net web page .net ajax R%20dummies16-part976

[2,]    5   17
[3,]    8   20
[4,]   11   23
This reduction doesn’t mean, however, that rows stay rows. In this case, R
made the rows columns. This is due to the fact that R first selects the values,
and then adds the dimensions necessary to represent the data correctly. In
this case R needs two dimensions with four indices (the number of columns)
and two indices (the number of tables), respectively. As R fills a matrix
column-wise, the original rows now turned into columns.
Combining Different Types of Values in a Data Frame
Prior to this point in the book, you combine values of the same type into either
a vector or a matrix. But datasets are, in general, built up from different data
types. You can have, for example, the names of your employees, their salaries, and
the date they started at your company all in the same dataset. But you can’t
combine all this data in one matrix without converting the data to a character data.
So, you need a new data structure to keep all this information together in R. That
data structure is a data frame.
Creating a data frame from a matrix
Let’s take a look again at the number of baskets scored by Granny and her
friend Geraldine. In the “Adding a second dimension” section, earlier in this
chapter, you created a matrix 
baskets.team
with the number of baskets for both
ladies. It makes sense to make this matrix a data frame with two variables: one
containing Granny’s baskets and one containing Geraldine’s baskets.
Using the function as.data.frame
To convert the matrix 
baskets.team
into a data frame, you use the function
as.data.frame()
, like this:
> baskets.df <- as.data.frame(t(baskets.team))
You don’t have to use the transpose function, 
t()
, to create a data frame, but
Text searchable pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
select text in pdf; pdf searchable text converter
Text searchable pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
text select tool pdf; search text in pdf using java
in our example we want each player to be a separate variable. With data frames,
each variable is a column, but in the original matrix, the rows represent the
baskets for a single player. So, in order to get the desired result, you first have to
transpose the matrix with 
t()
before converting the matrix to a data frame with
as.data.frame()
.
Looking at the structure of a data frame
If you take a look at the object, it looks exactly the same as the transposed
matrix 
t(baskets.team)
, as shown in the following output:
> baskets.df
Granny Geraldine
1st     12         5
2nd      4         4
3rd      5         2
4th      6         4
5th      9        12
6th      3         9
But there is a very important difference between the two: 
baskets.df
is a data
frame. This becomes clear if you take a look at the internal structure of the object,
using the 
str()
function:
> str(baskets.df)
‘data.frame’: 6 obs. of  2 variables:
$ Granny   : num  12 4 5 6 9 3
$ Geraldine: num  5 4 2 4 12 9
Now this starts looking more like a real dataset. You can see in the output that
you have six observations and two variables. The variables are called 
Granny
and
Geraldine
. It’s important to realize that each variable in itself is a vector; hence, it
has one of the types you learn about in Chapters 4, 5, and 6. In this case, the
output tells you that both variables are numeric.
Counting values and variables
To know how many observations a data frame has, you can use the 
nrow()
function as you would with a matrix, like this:
> nrow(baskets.df)
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter library for Visual Studio .NET project. Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from TXT formats in VB.NET
converting pdf to searchable text format; search pdf for text in multiple files
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Visual Studio .NET project. .NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable PDF document. Free .NET library for
how to select text in pdf image; pdf text searchable
[1] 6
Likewise, the 
ncol()
function gives you the number of variables. But you can
also use the 
length()
function to get the number of variables for a data frame, like
this:
> length(baskets.df)
[1] 2
Creating a data frame from scratch
The conversion from a matrix to a data frame can’t be used to construct a data
frame with different types of values. If you combine both numeric and character
data in a matrix for example, everything will be converted to character. You can
construct a data frame from scratch, though, using the 
data.frame()
function.
Making a data frame from vectors
So, let’s make a little data frame with the names, salaries, and starting dates
of a few imaginary co-workers. First, you create three vectors that contain the
necessary information like this:
> employee <- c(‘John Doe’,’Peter Gynn’,’Jolie Hope’)
> salary <- c(21000, 23400, 26800)
> startdate <- as.Date(c(‘2010-11-1’,’2008-3-25’,’2007-3-14’))
Now you have three different vectors in your workspace:
A character vector called 
employee
, containing the names
A numeric vector called 
salary
, containing the yearly salaries
A date vector called 
startdate
, containing the dates on which the contracts
started
Next, you combine the three vectors into a data frame using the following
code:
> employ.data <- data.frame(employee, salary, startdate)
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
pdf select text; search multiple pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing formats in VB.NET. Support
text searchable pdf file; find text in pdf image
The result of this is a data frame, 
employ.data
, with the following structure:
> str(employ.data)
‘data.frame’: 3 obs. of  3 variables:
$ employee : Factor w/ 3 levels “John Doe”,”Jolie Hope”,..: 1 3 2
$ salary   : num  21000 23400 26800
$ startdate: Date, format: “2010-11-01” “2008-03-25” ...
To combine a number of vectors into a data frame, you simple add all
vectors as arguments to the 
data.frame()
function, separated by commas. R
will create a data frame with the variables that are named the same as the
vectors used.
Keeping characters as characters
You may have noticed something odd when looking at the structure of
employ.data
. Whereas the vector 
employee
is a character vector, R made the
variable 
employee
in the data frame a factor.
R does this by default, but you have an extra argument to the 
data.frame()
function that can avoid this — namely, the argument 
stringsAsFactors
. In the
employ.data
example, you can prevent the transformation to a factor of the
employee
variable by using the following code:
> employ.data <- data.frame(employee, salary, startdate,
stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
If you look at the structure of the data frame now, you see that the variable
employee
is a character vector, as shown in the following output:
> str(employ.data)
‘data.frame’: 3 obs. of  3 variables:
$ employee : chr  “John Doe” “Peter Gynn” “Jolie Hope”
$ salary   : num  21000 23400 26800
$ startdate: Date, format: “2010-11-01” “2008-03-25” ...
By default, R always transforms character vectors to factors when creating a
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
search pdf files for text programmatically; search pdf files for text
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
Selection of turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF. Online demo allows converting tiff to PDF online. C# source codes are provided to use in .NET class
pdf editor with search and replace text; search text in multiple pdf
data frame with character vectors or converting a character matrix to a data
frame. This can be a nasty cause of errors in your code if you’re not aware of
it. If you make it a habit to always specify the 
stringsAsFactors
argument,
you can avoid a lot of frustration.
Naming variables and observations
In the previous section, you select data based on the name of the variables
and the observations. These names are similar to the column and row names of a
matrix, but there are a few differences as well. We discuss these in the next
section.
Working with variable names
Variables in a data frame always need to have a name. To access the variable
names, you can again treat a data frame like a matrix and use the function
colnames()
like this:
> colnames(employ.data)
[1] “employee”  “salary”    “startdate”
But, in fact, this is taking the long way around. In case of a data frame, the
colnames()
function lets the hard work be done internally by another function, the
names()
function. So, to get the variable names, you can just use that function
directly like this:
> names(employ.data)
[1] “employee”  “salary”    “startdate”
Similar to how you do it with matrices, you can use that same function to
assign new names to the variables as well. For example, to rename the variable
startdate
to 
firstday
, you can use the following code:
> names(employ.data)[3] <- ‘firstday’
> names(employ.data)
[1] “employee” “salary”   “firstday”
Naming observations
VB.NET Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF
files, VB.NET view PDF online, VB.NET convert PDF to tiff, VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Turning tiff into searchable PDF or scanned PDF.
pdf text search tool; how to select text in pdf and copy
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi empowered to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
find and replace text in pdf file; pdf find highlighted text
One important difference between a matrix and a data frame is that data
frames always have named observations. Whereas the 
rownames()
function returns
NULL
if you didn’t specify the row names of a matrix, it will always give a result in
the case of a data frame.
Check the outcome of the following code:
> rownames(employ.data)
[1] “1” “2” “3”
By default, the row names — or observation names — of a data frame are
simply the row numbers in character format. You can’t get rid of them, even if you
try to delete them by assigning the 
NULL
value as you can do with matrices.
You shouldn’t try to get rid of them either, because your data frame won’t
be displayed correctly any more if you do.
You can, however, change the row names exactly as you do with matrices,
simply by assigning the values via the 
rownames()
function, like this:
> rownames(employ.data) <- c(‘Chef’,’BigChef’,’BiggerChef’)
> employ.data
employee salary   firstday
Chef          John Doe  21000 2010-11-01
BigChef     Peter Gynn  23400 2008-03-25
BiggerChef  Jolie Hope  26800 2007-03-14
Don’t be fooled, though: Row names can look like another variable, but you
can’t access them the way you access the other variables.
Manipulating Values in a Data Frame
Creating a data frame is nice, but data frames would be pretty useless if you
couldn’t change the values or add data to them. Luckily, data frames have a very
nice feature: When it comes to manipulating the values, almost all tricks you use
on matrices can be used on data frames as well. Next to that, you can also use
some methods that are designed specifically for data frames. In this next section,
we explain these methods for manipulating data frames. For that, we use the data
frame 
baskets.df
that you created in the “Creating a data frame from a matrix”
XImage.OCR for .NET, Recognize Text from Images and Documents
Output OCR result to memory, text searchable PDF, Word, Text file, etc. Next Steps. Download Free Trial Download and try OCR for .NET with online support.
how to search text in pdf document; how to select text in pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
searchable PDF document. Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Create writable PDF file from text (
how to search a pdf document for text; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
section, earlier in this chapter.
Extracting variables, observations, and values
In many cases, you can extract values from a data frame by pretending that
it’s a matrix and using the techniques you used in the previous sections as well. But
unlike matrices and arrays, data frames are not vectors but lists of vectors. You
start with lists in the “Combining different objects in a list” section, later in this
chapter. For now, just remember that, although they may look like matrices, data
frames are definitely not.
Pretending it’s a matrix
If you want to extract values from a data frame, you can just pretend it’s a
matrix and start from there. Both the index numbers and the index names can be
used. For example, you can get the number of baskets scored by Geraldine in the
third game like this:
> baskets.df[‘3rd’, ‘Geraldine’]
[1] 2
Likewise, you can get all the baskets that Granny scored using the column
index, like this:
> baskets.df[, 1]
[1] 12  4  5  6  9  3
Or, if you want this to be a data frame, you can use the argument 
drop=FALSE
exactly as you do with matrices:
> str(baskets.df[, 1, drop=FALSE])
‘data.frame’: 6 obs. of  1 variable:
$ Granny: num  12 4 5 6 9 3
Note that, unlike with matrices, the row names are dropped if you don’t
specify the 
drop=FALSE
argument.
Putting your dollar where your data is
As a careful reader, you noticed already that every variable is preceded by a
dollar sign (
$
). R isn’t necessarily pimping your data here — the dollar sign is
simply a specific way for accessing variables. To access the variable 
Granny
, you
can use the dollar sign like this:
> baskets.df$Granny
[1] 12  4  5  6  9  3
R will return a vector with all the values contained in that variable. Note again
that the row names are dropped here.
With this dollar-sign method, you can access only one variable at a time. If
you want to access multiple variables at once using their names, you need to
use the square brackets, as in the preceding section.
Adding observations to a data frame
As time goes by, new data may appear and needs to be added to the dataset.
Just like matrices, data frames can be appended using the 
rbind()
function.
Adding a single observation
Say that Granny and Geraldine played another game with their team, and you
want to add the number of baskets they made. The 
rbind()
function lets you do
that easily:
> result <- rbind(baskets.df, c(7,4))
> result
Granny Geraldine
1st     12         5
2nd      4         4
3rd      5         2
4th      6         4
5th      9        12
6th      3         9
7        7         4
The data frame 
result
now has an extra observation compared to 
baskets.df
.
As explained in the “Combining vectors into a matrix” section, 
rbind()
can take
multiple arguments, as long as they’re compatible. In this case, you bind a vector
c(7,4)
at the bottom of the data frame.
Note that R, by default, sets the row number as the row name for the added
rows. You can use the 
rownames()
function to adjust this, or you can do that
immediately by specifying the row name between quotes in the 
rbind()
function like this:
> baskets.df <- rbind(baskets.df,’7th’ = c(7,4))
If you check the object 
baskets.df
now, you see the extra observation at the
bottom with the correct row name:
> baskets.df
Granny Geraldine
1st     12         5
2nd      4         4
3rd      5         2
4th      6         4
5th      9        12
6th      3         9
7th      7         4
Alternatively, you can use indexing as well, to add an extra observation. You
see how in the next section.
Adding a series of new observations using rbind
If you need to add multiple new observations to a data frame, doing it one-by-
one is not entirely practical. Luckily, you also can use 
rbind()
to attach a matrix or
a data frame with new observations to the original data frame. The matching of
the columns is done by name, so you need to make sure that the columns in the
matrix or the variables in the data frame with new observations match the variable
names in the original data frame.
Let’s add another two game results to the data frame 
baskets.df
. First, you
construct a new data frame with the number of baskets Granny and Geraldine
scored, like this:
> new.baskets <- data.frame(Granny=c(3,8),Geraldine=c(9,4))
If you use the 
data.frame()
function to construct a new data frame, you
can immediately set the variable names by specifying them in the function call,
as in the preceding example. That code creates a data frame with the
variables Granny and Geraldine where each variable contains the vector given
after the equal sign.
To be able to bind the data frame 
new.baskets
to the original 
baskets.df
, you
have to make sure that the variable names match exactly, including the case.
Next, you add the optional row names and the necessary column names with
the following code:
> rownames(new.baskets) <- c(‘8th’,’9th’)
You also can define the column names yourself as the vector
c(‘Granny’,’Geraldine’)
, but using 
names(baskets.df)
you make sure that the
names match perfectly between the data frame 
baskets.df
and the matrix
new.baskets
.
To add the matrix to the data frame, you simply do the following:
> baskets.df <- rbind(baskets.df, new.baskets)
You can try yourself to do the same thing using a data frame instead of a
matrix. In Chapter 13, you use more advanced techniques for combining data from
different data frames.
Adding a series of values using indices
You also can use the indices to add a set of new observations at one time. You
get exactly the same result if you change all the previous code by this simple line:
> baskets.df[c(‘8th’,’9th’), ] <- matrix(c(3,8,9,4), ncol=2)
With this code, you do the following:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested