how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Select text pdf file software application project winforms html .net UWP R%20dummies18-part978

The second line contains a 
$
, which indicates the start of the first element. The
rest of that line you should be able to read now: It tells you that this first
element is a numeric matrix with two rows and six columns (see the previous
sections on matrices).
The third line is preceded by 
..
, indicating that this line also belongs to the first
element. If you look at the output of 
str(baskets.team)
you see this line and
the following two as well. R keeps the row and column names of a matrix in an
attribute called 
dimnames
. In the sidebar “Playing with attributes,” earlier in this
chapter, you manipulate those yourself. For now, you have to remember only
that an attribute is an extra bit of information that can be attached to almost
any object in R.
The 
dimnames
attribute is by itself again a list.
The fourth and fifth lines tell you that this list contains two elements: a
character vector of length 2 and one of length 6. R uses the 
..
only as a
placeholder, so you can read from the indentation which lines belong to which
element.
Finally, the sixth line starts again with a 
$
and gives you the structure of the
second element — in this case, a character vector with only one value.
If you look at the output of the 
str(baskets.nlist)
, you get essentially the
same thing. The only difference is that R now puts the name of each element right
after the 
$
.
In many cases, looking at the structure of the output from a function can
give you a lot of insight into which information is contained in that object.
Often, these objects are lists, and the piece of information you’re looking for is
buried somewhere in that list.
Seeing the forest through the trees
Working with lists in R is not difficult when you’re used to it, and lists offer
many advantages. You can keep related data neatly together, avoiding an overload
of different objects in your workspace. You have access to powerful functions to
Select text pdf file - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert pdf to searchable text; convert pdf to searchable text online
Select text pdf file - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search pdf files for text; find and replace text in pdf file
apply a certain algorithm on a whole set of objects at once. Above all, lists allow
you to write flexible and efficient code in R.
Yet, many beginning programmers shy away from lists because they’re
overwhelmed by the possibilities. R allows you to manipulate lists in many different
ways, but often it isn’t clear what the best way to perform a certain task is.
Very likely, you’ll get into trouble at some point by missing important
details, but don’t let that scare you. There are a few simple rules that can
prevent much of the pain:
If you can name the elements in a list, do so. Working with names always
makes life easier, because you don’t have to remember the order of the
elements in the list.
If you need to work on a single element, always use either 
[[]]
or 
$
.
If you need to select different elements in a list, always use 
[]
. Having
named elements can definitely help in this case.
If you need a list as a result of a command, always use 
[]
.
If the elements in your list have names, use them!
If in doubt, consult the Help files.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image, etc. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
pdf text search tool; find text in pdf image
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
RsterEdge XDoc PDF SDK for .NET, VB.NET users are able to extract image from PDF page or file and specified VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by
select text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf and copy
Part III
Coding in R
In this part . . .
It’s one thing to do your work at the command line, but you can do more with
R. Or, more precisely, you can do more with less effort if you wrap repeating tasks
into functions.
This part introduces you to the way functions work in R and gives you all the
building blocks you need to do a maximum amount of work with a minimum
amount of code.
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Convert PDF to SVG. Convert PDF to Text. Convert PDF to JPEG. Convert PDF to Png, Gif, Bitmap Images. File & Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File
how to select text in pdf image; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Enable users abilities to adjust color and transparency while scraping text from PDF file. Able to redact selected text in PDF document.
search pdf files for text programmatically; pdf find and replace text
Chapter 8
Putting the Fun in Functions
In This Chapter
Automating your work with functions
Playing with arguments
Finding objects within the functions
Working with methods
Automating your work is probably the number-one reason why you use a
programming language. For that, you can get pretty far with the built-in functions
of R in combination with scripts, but scripts aren’t very flexible when dealing with
variable input. Luckily, R allows you to write your own custom functions (for
example, to automate the cleaning of your data, to apply a series of analyses with
one command, or to construct custom plots). In this chapter, you discover how to
write and work with functions in R.
Moving from Scripts to Functions
Going from a script to a function doesn’t take much effort at all. A function is
essentially a piece of code that is executed consecutively and without interruption.
In that way, a function doesn’t differ that much from a script run using the 
source()
function, as we explain in Chapter 2.
But a function has two very nice advantages over scripts:
It can work with variable input, so you use it with different data.
It returns the output as an object, so you can work with the result of that
function.
The best way to learn to swim is by jumping in the deep end, so let’s just
write a function to show you how easy that is in R.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
search pdf documents for text; how to select text in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
is loaded as sample file for viewing on the viewer. See screeshot as below. Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document
how to select text in pdf; text select tool pdf
Making the script
Suppose you want to present fractional numbers as percentages, nicely
rounded to one decimal digit. Here’s how to achieve that:
1. Multiply the fractional numbers by 100.
2. Round the result to one decimal place.
You can use the 
round()
function to do this (see Chapter 4).
3. Paste a percentage sign after the rounded number.
The 
paste()
function is at your service to fulfill this task (see Chapter 5).
4. Print the result.
The 
print()
function will do this.
You can easily translate these steps into a little script for R. So, open a new
script file in your editor and type the following code:
x <- c(0.458, 1.6653, 0.83112)
percent <- round(x * 100, digits = 1)
result <- paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
print(result)
If you save this script as a script file — for example, 
pastePercent.R
— you
can now call this script in the console (as shown in Chapter 2) with the following
command:
> source(‘pastePercent.R’)
[1] “45.8%”  “166.5%” “83.1%”
That works splendidly, as long as you want to see the same three numbers
every time you call the script. But using the script for other data would be mildly
inconvenient, because you would have to change the script every time.
In most editors, you also can source a script (send a complete script file to
the R console) with one simple click. In RStudio, this is done by clicking the
Source button or by pressing Ctrl+Shift+Enter.
Transforming the script
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit OpenOffice
pptx) on webpage, Convert CSV to PDF file online, convert CSV to save signatures to OpenOffice and CSV file. Viewer particular text tool can select text on all
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; pdf find highlighted text
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
text searchable pdf file; how to select all text in pdf file
To make this script into a function, you need to do a few things. Look at the
script as a little factory that takes the raw numeric material and polishes it up to
shiny percentages every mathematician will crave.
First, you have to construct the factory building, preferably with an address so
people would know where to send their numbers. Then you have to install a front
gate so you can get the raw numbers in. Next, you create the production line to
transform those numbers. Finally, you have to install a back gate so you can send
your shiny percentages into the world.
To build your factory, change the script to the following code:
addPercent <- function(x){
percent <- round(x * 100, digits = 1)
result <- paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
return(result)
}
Let’s take a closer look at the different parts that make up this little factory.
The function is created from the following elements:
The keyword 
function
always must be followed by parentheses. It tells R that
what comes next is a function.
The parentheses after 
function
form the front gate, or argument list, of your
function. Between the parentheses, the arguments to the function are given. In
this case, there’s only one argument, named 
x
.
The braces, 
{}
, can be seen as the walls of your function. Everything between
the braces is part of the assembly line, or the body of your function.
The 
return()
statement is the back gate of your function. The object you put
between the parentheses is returned from inside the function to your workspace.
You can put only one object between the parentheses.
If you put all this together, you get a complete function, but R doesn’t know
where to find it yet. So, you use the assignment operator 
<-
to put this complete
function into an object named 
addPercent
. This is the address R can send numbers
to for transformation. Now the function has a nice name and is ready to use.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Pan around the PDF document. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
pdf text search; how to make a pdf file text searchable
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Default create. Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF page.
search multiple pdf files for text; select text in pdf
There’s no way you can define in the argument list that 
x
should be a
numeric vector. For example, if you try to use a character vector as a value for
x
, the multiplication inside the body will throw an error because you can’t
multiply characters by a number. If you want to control which type of object is
given as an argument, you have to do so manually, in the body of the function.
(We give examples of that in Chapters 9 and 10.)
Using the function
Save the script again, and load it into the console using the 
source()
command displayed earlier. Now you see . . . nothing. R doesn’t let you know by
itself that it loaded the function, but it’s there in the workspace, as you can check
by using 
ls()
:
> ls()
[1] “addPercent” “percent”       “result”        “x”
If you create a function and load it in the workspace by sourcing the script
containing the function, this function becomes an object in the workspace and
can, thus, be found using 
ls()
and — if necessary — removed using 
rm()
.
Formatting the numbers
The output of 
ls()
tells you the function is there, so you should be able to use
it. You can now create the most astonishing percentages by using the
addPercent()
function like this:
> new.numbers <- c(0.8223, 0.02487, 1.62, 0.4)
> addPercent(new.numbers)
[1] “82.2%” “2.5%”  “162%”  “40%”
Actually, you could use the code 
sprintf(“%1.1f%%”,100*x)
instead of the
addPercent()
function for a very similar result. C coders will recognize
sprintf()
immediately and agree that it’s both incredibly versatile and
complex. The function comes with a very long Help page that’s definitely worth
reading if you need to format values often. If not, save yourself the headache.
Playing with function objects
Because a function in R is just another object, you can manipulate it much the
same way as you manipulate other objects. You can assign the function to a new
object and effectively copy it like this:
> ppaste <- addPercent
Now 
ppaste
is a function as well that does exactly the same as 
addPercent
.
Note that you don’t add parentheses after 
addPercent
in this case.
If you add the parentheses, you call the function and put the result of that
call in 
ppaste
. If you don’t add the parentheses, you refer to the function
object itself without calling it. This difference is important when you use
functions as arguments (see the “Using functions as arguments” section, later
in this chapter).
You can print the content of a function by simply typing its name at the
prompt, like this:
> ppaste
function(x){
percent <- round(x * 100, digits = 1)
result <- paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
return(result)
}
So, the assignment to 
ppaste
actually copied the function code of 
addPercent
into a new object.
That’s all cool, but it also means that you can effectively erase a function if
you accidentally use the same name for another object. Or you could lose data
if you accidentally gave the same name as your data object to a function.
There’s no undo button in R, so pay attention to the names you choose.
Luckily, this problem doesn’t occur with the base R functions and functions
contained in packages. Although it’s not a good idea, you could, for example, name
a vector 
sum
and still be able to use the 
sum()
function afterward. When you use
sum()
as a function, R only searches for functions with that name and disregards all
other objects with the same name.
Reducing the number of lines
Not all elements mentioned in the “Transforming the script” section, earlier in
this chapter, are required. In fact, the 
return()
statement is optional, because, by
default, R will always return the value of the last line of code in the function body.
Returning values by default
Suppose you forgot to add 
return(result)
in the 
addPercent()
function. What
would happen then? You can find out if you delete the last line of the 
addPercent()
function, save the file, and source it again to load it into the workspace.
Any change you make to a function will take effect only after you send the
adapted code to the console. This will effectively overwrite the old function
object by a new one.
If you try 
addPercent(new.numbers)
again, you see . . . nothing. Apparently,
the function doesn’t do anything anymore — but this is an illusion, as you can see
with the following code:
> print( addPercent(new.numbers) )
[1] “82.2%” “2.5%”  “162%”  “40%”
In this case, the last line of the function returns the value of 
result
invisibly,
which is why you see it only if you specifically ask to print it. The value is returned
invisibly due to the assignment in the last line. Because this isn’t really practical,
you can drop the assignment in the last line and change the function code to the
following:
addPercent <- function(x){
percent <- round(x * 100, digits = 1)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
This function works again as before. It may look like 
return()
is utterly
useless, but you really need it if you want to exit the function before the end of the
code in the body. For example, you could add a line to the 
addPercent
function that
checks whether x is numeric, and if not, returns 
NULL
, like this:
addPercent <- function(x){
if( !is.numeric(x) ) return(NULL)
percent <- round(x * 100, digits = 1)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
In Chapter 9, we explain how to use 
if()
conditions. In Chapter 10, you meet
the functions you need to throw your own warnings and errors.
Breaking the walls
The braces, 
{}
, form the proverbial wall around the function, but in some
cases you can drop them as well. Suppose you want to calculate the odds from a
proportion. The odds of something happening is no more than the chance it
happens divided by the chance it doesn’t happen. So, to calculate the odds, you
can write a function like this:
> odds <- function(x) x / (1-x)
Even without the braces or 
return()
statement, this works perfectly fine, as
you can see in the following example:
> odds(0.8)
[1] 4
If a function consists of only one line of code, you can just add that line
after the argument list without enclosing it in braces. R will see the code after
the argument list as the body of the function.
You could do the same with the 
addPercent()
function by nesting everything
like this:
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested