how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Convert pdf to searchable text application SDK utility azure wpf windows visual studio R%20dummies19-part979

> addPercent <- function(x) paste(round(x * 100, digits = 1), “%”, sep =
“”)
That’s a cunning plan to give the next person reading that code a major
headache. It’s a bit less of a cunning plan if that next person is you, though, and
chances are, it will be.
Saving space in a function body is far less important than keeping the code
readable, because saving space gains you nothing. Constructs like the 
odds
function are useful only in very specific cases. You find examples of this in the
“Using anonymous functions” section, later in this chapter, as well as in
Chapter 13.
Using Arguments the Smart Way
In Chapter 3, we explain how you can specify arguments in a function call. To
summarize:
Arguments are always named when you define the function. But when you call
the function, you don’t have to specify the name of the argument if you give
them in the order in which they appear in the argument list of a function.
Arguments can be optional, in which case you don’t have to specify a value for
them.
Arguments can have a default value, which is used if you didn’t specify a value
for that argument yourself.
Not only can you use as many arguments as you like — or as is feasible, at
least — but you can very easily pass arguments on to functions inside the body of
your own function with the simply genius 
dots
argument. Fasten your seat belts —
we’re off to make some sweet R magic.
Adding more arguments
The argument list of the 
addPercent()
function doesn’t really look much like a
Convert pdf to searchable text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
pdf searchable text converter; cannot select text in pdf file
Convert pdf to searchable text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
can't select text in pdf file; search text in multiple pdf
list yet. Actually, the only thing you can do for now is tell the function which
number you want to see converted. It serves perfectly well for this little function,
but you can do a lot more with arguments than this.
The 
addPercent()
function automatically multiplies the numbers by 100. This
is fine if you want to convert fractions to percentages, but if the calculated numbers
are percentages already, you would have to divide these numbers first by 100 to
get the correct result, like this:
> percentages <- c(58.23, 120.4, 33)
> addPercent(percentages/100)
[1] “58.2%”  “120.4%” “33%”
That’s quite a way around, but you can avoid this by adding another argument
to the function that controls the multiplication factor.
Adding the mult argument
You add extra arguments by including them between the parentheses after
the function keyword. All arguments are separated by commas. To add an
argument 
mult
that controls the multiplication factor in your code, you change the
function like this:
addPercent <- function(x, mult){
percent <- round(x * mult, digits = 1)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
Now you can specify the 
mult
argument in the call to 
addPercent()
. If you
want to use the 
percentages
vector from the previous section, you use the
addPercent()
function, like this:
> addPercent(percentages, mult = 1)
[1] “58.2%”  “120.4%” “33%”
Adding a default value
Adding an extra argument gives you more control over what the function does,
but it also introduces a new problem. If you don’t specify the 
mult
argument in the
addPercent()
function, you get the following result:
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
find and replace text in pdf; converting pdf to searchable text format
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
& searchable text formats. Support .NET WinForms, ASP.NET MVC in IIS, ASP.NET Ajax, Azure cloud service, DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Convert PDF document page
pdf text select tool; search pdf for text in multiple files
> addPercent(new.numbers)
Error in x * mult : ‘mult’ is missing
Because you didn’t specify the 
mult
argument, R has no way of knowing which
number you want to multiply 
x
by, so it stops and tells you it needs more
information. That’s pretty annoying, because it also means you would have to
specify 
mult=100
every time you used the function with fractions. Specifying a
default value for the argument 
mult
takes care of this.
You specify default values for any argument in the argument list by adding
the 
=
sign and the default value after the respective argument.
To get the wanted default behavior, you adapt 
addPercent()
like this:
addPercent <- function(x, mult = 100){
percent <- round(x * mult, digits = 1)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
Now the argument works exactly the same as arguments with a default value
from base R functions. If you don’t specify the argument, the default value of 100 is
used. If you do specify a value for that argument, that value is used instead. So, in
the case of 
addPercent()
, you can now use it as shown in the following example:
> addPercent(new.numbers)
[1] “82.2%” “2.5%”  “162%”  “40%”
> addPercent(percentages, 1)
[1] “58.2%”  “120.4%” “33%”
You don’t have to specify the names of the arguments if you give them in
the same order as they’re given in the argument list. This works for all
functions in R, including those you create yourself.
Conjuring tricks with dots
The 
addPercent()
function rounds every percentage to one decimal place, but
you can add another argument to specify the number of digits the 
round()
function
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
PDF document conversion SDK provides reliable and effective .NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
how to select all text in pdf; how to make pdf text searchable
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
more companies are trying to convert printed business on artificial intelligence to extract text from documents will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT
pdf find text; pdf make text searchable
should use in the same way you did for the 
mult
argument in the previous section.
However, if you have a lot of arguments you pass on to other functions inside the
body, you’ll end up with quite a long list of arguments.
R has a genius solution for this: the dots (
...
) argument. You can see the dots
argument as an extra gate in your little function. Through that gate, you drop
additional resources (arguments) immediately at the right spot in the production
line (the body) without the hassle of having to check everything at the main gate.
You normally use the dots argument by adding it at the end of the
argument list of your own function and at the end of the arguments for the
function you want to pass arguments to.
To pass any argument to the 
round()
function inside the body of 
addPercent
,
you adapt the code of the latter as follows:
addPercent <- function(x, mult = 100, ...){
percent <- round(x * mult, ...)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
Now you can specify the 
digits
argument for the 
round()
function in the
addPercent()
call like this:
> addPercent(new.numbers, digits = 2)
[1] “82.23%” “2.49%”  “162%”   “40%”
You don’t have to specify any argument if the function you pass the arguments
to doesn’t require it. You can use the 
addPercent()
function as before:
> addPercent(new.numbers)
[1] “82%”  “2%”   “162%” “40%”
Notice that the outcome isn’t the same as it used to be. The numbers are
rounded to integers and not to the first decimal.
If you don’t specify an argument in lieu of the dots, the function where the
arguments are passed to uses its own default values. If you want to specify
different default values, you’ll have to add a specific argument to the argument
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
The PDF document file created by RasterEdge C# PDF document creator library is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics
convert pdf to word searchable text; pdf search and replace text
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage One is that compared with HTML file, PDF file (a not be easily edited), is less searchable for search
pdf searchable text; pdf select text
list instead of using the dots.
So, to get 
addPercent()
to use a default rounding to one decimal, you have to
use the following code:
addPercent <- function(x, mult = 100, digits = 1){
percent <- round(x * mult, digits = digits)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
You don’t have to give the argument in the argument list the same name as
the argument used by 
round()
. You can use whatever name you want, as long as
you place it in the right position within the body. However, if you can use names
for arguments that also are used by native functions within R, it’ll be easier for
people to understand what the argument does without having to look at the source
code.
R won’t complain if you use the dots argument in more than one function
within the body, but before passing arguments to more than one function in
the body, you have to be sure this won’t cause any trouble. R passes all extra
arguments to every function, and — if you’re lucky — complains about the
resulting mess afterward.
Using functions as arguments
You read that correctly. In R, you can pass a function itself as an argument. In
the “Playing with function objects” section, earlier in this chapter, you saw that you
can easily assign the complete code of a function to a new object. In much the
same way, you also can assign the function code to an argument. This opens up a
complete new world of possibilities. We show you only a small piece of that world
in this section.
Applying different ways of rounding
In Chapter 4, we show you different options for rounding numbers. The
addPercent()
function uses 
round()
for that, but you may want to use one of the
other options — for example, 
signif()
. The 
signif()
function doesn’t round to a
specific number of decimals; instead, it rounds to a specific number of digits (see
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
library also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to
how to search pdf files for text; how to make a pdf document text searchable
C# PDF: C# Code to Draw Text and Graphics on PDF Document
Draw and write searchable text on PDF file by C# code in both Web and Windows applications. C#.NET PDF Document Drawing Application.
find text in pdf files; how to search a pdf document for text
Chapter 4). You can’t use it before you call 
addPercent()
, because the 
round()
function in that body will mess everything up again.
Of course, you could write a second function specifically for that, but there’s no
need to do so. Instead, you can just adapt 
addPercent()
in such a way that you
simply give the function you want to use as an argument, like this:
addPercent <- function(x, mult = 100, FUN = round, ...){
percent <- FUN(x * mult, ...)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
This really couldn’t be easier: You add an argument to the list — in this case,
FUN
— and then you can use the name of that argument as a function. Also,
specifying a default value works exactly the same as with other arguments; just
specify the default value — in this case, 
round
— after an 
=
sign.
If you want to use 
signif()
now for rounding the numbers to three digits, you
can easily do that using the following call to 
addPercent()
:
> addPercent(new.numbers, FUN = signif, digits = 3)
[1] “82.2%” “2.49%” “162%”  “40%”
What happens here?
1. As before, R takes the vector 
new.numbers
and multiplies it by 100, because
that’s the default value for 
mult
.
2. R assigns the function code of 
signif
to 
FUN
, so now 
FUN()
is a perfect copy
of 
signif()
and works exactly the same way.
3. R takes the argument 
digits
and passes it on to 
FUN()
.
Note the absence of parentheses in the argument assignment. If you added
the parentheses there, you would assign the result of a call to 
signif()
instead of
the function itself. R would interpret 
signif()
, in that case, as a nested function,
and that’s not what you want. Plus, R would throw an error because, in that case,
you call 
signif()
without arguments, and R doesn’t like that.
Using anonymous functions
You can, of course, use any function you want for the 
FUN
argument. In fact,
that function doesn’t even need to have a name, because you effectively copy the
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
how to search text in pdf document; search text in pdf image
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi to add annotations to Word, such as add text annotations to
pdf text searchable; search pdf for text
code. So, instead of giving a function name, you can just add the code as an
argument as a nameless or anonymous function. An anonymous function is a
function without a name.
Suppose you have the quarterly profits of your company in a vector like this:
> profits <- c(2100, 1430, 3580, 5230)
Your boss asks you to report how much profit was made in each quarter
relative to the total for the year, and, of course, you want to use your new
addPercent()
function. To calculate the relative profits in percent, you could write a
rel.profit()
function like this:
> rel.profit <- function(x) round(x / sum(x) * 100)
But you don’t have to. Instead, you can just use the function body itself as an
argument, as in the following example:
> addPercent(profits,
FUN = function(x) round(x / sum(x) * 100) )
[1] “17%” “12%” “29%” “42%”
Of course, this isn’t the optimal way of doing this specific task. You could
easily have gotten the same result with the following code:
> addPercent(profits / sum(profits))
[1] “17%” “12%” “29%” “42%”
But in some cases, this construct with anonymous functions is really a treat,
especially when you want to use functions that can be written in only a little code
and aren’t used anywhere else in your script. (You find more — and better —
examples of anonymous functions in Chapter 13.)
Coping with Scoping
In the previous chapters, you work solely in the workspace. Every object you
create ends up in this environment, which is called the global environment. The
workspace — or global environment — is the universe of the R user where
everything happens.
R gurus will tell you that this “universe” is actually contained in another
“universe” and that one in yet another, and so on — but that “outer space” is a
hostile environment suited only to daring coders without fear of breaking
things. So, there’s no need to go there now.
Crossing the borders
In the functions in the previous sections, you worked with some objects that
you didn’t first create in the workspace. You use the arguments 
x
mult
, and 
FUN
as
if they’re objects, and you create an object 
percent
within the function that you
can’t find back in the workspace after using the function. So, what’s going on?
Creating a test case
Let’s find out through a small example. First, create an object 
x
and a small
test()
function like this:
x <- 1:5
test <- function(x){
cat(“This is x:”, x, “\n”)
rm(x)
cat(“This is x after removing it:”,x,”\n”)
}
Matching functions
In the examples in the “Using functions as arguments” section, you
effectively pass the code of a function as an argument. This also means that
if you have an object with the same name as the function you want to use,
this whole construct won’t work. Suppose you had the not-so-smart idea of
creating a vector with the relative gain of a couple rounds of poker like this:
> round <- c(0.48,-0.52,1.88)
If you tried to call 
addPercent()
with the 
FUN
argument on this vector, you’d
get the following error:
> addPercent(round,FUN=round)
Error in addPercent(round, FUN = round) :
could not find function “FUN”
Instead of passing the code of the 
round
function, R passes the vector 
round
as the 
FUN
argument. To avoid these kind of problems, you can use a special
function, 
match.fun()
, in the body of 
addPercent()
, like this:
addPercent <- function(x, mult = 100, FUN, ...){
FUN <- match.fun(FUN)
percent <- FUN(x * mult, ...)
paste(percent, “%”, sep = “”)
}
This function will look for a function that matches the name 
round
and copy
that code into the 
FUN
argument instead of the vector 
round
. As an added
bonus, 
match.fun()
also allows you to use a character object as the
argument, so specifying 
FUN = ‘round’
now works as well. All native R
functions use 
match.fun()
for this purpose, and we can only advise you to do
the same if you write code that will be used by other people. But passing
functions works fine without using 
match.fun()
as well, as long as you use
sensible names for the other objects in your workspace.
The 
test()
function doesn’t do much. It takes an argument 
x
, prints it to the
console, removes it, and tries to print it again. You may think this function will fail,
because 
x
disappears after the line 
rm(x)
. But no, if you try this function it works
just fine, as shown in the following example:
> test(5:1)
This is x: 5 4 3 2 1
This is x after removing it: 1 2 3 4 5
Even after removing 
x
, R still can find another 
x
that it can print. If you look a
bit more closely, you see that the 
x
printed in the second line is actually not the
one you gave as an argument, but the 
x
you created before in the workspace. How
come?
Searching the path
If you use a function, the function first creates a temporary local environment.
This local environment is nested within the global environment, which means that,
from that local environment, you also can access any object from the global
environment. As soon as the function ends, the local environment is destroyed
together with all objects in it.
To be completely correct, a function always creates an environment within
the environment it’s called from, called the parent environment. If you call a
function from the workspace through a script or using the command line, this
parent environment happens to be the global environment.
You can see a schematic illustration of how the 
test()
function works in Figure
8-1. The big rectangle represents the global environment, and the small rectangle
represents the local environment of the test function. In the global environment,
you assign the value 
1:5
to the object 
x
. In the function call, however, you assign
the value 
5:1
to the argument 
x
. This argument becomes an object 
x
in the local
environment.
Figure 8-1: How R looks through global and local environments.
If R sees any object name — in this case, 
x
— mentioned in any code in the
function, it first searches the local environment. Because it finds an object 
x
there,
it uses that one for the first 
cat()
statement. In the next line, R removes that
object 
x
. So, when R reaches the third line, it can’t find an object 
x
in the local
environment anymore. No problem. R moves up the stack of environments and
checks to see if it finds anything looking like an 
x
in the global environment.
Because it can find an 
x
there, it uses that one in the second 
cat()
statement.
If you use 
rm()
inside a function, 
rm()
will, by default, delete only objects
within that function. This way, you can avoid running out of memory when you
write functions that have to work on huge datasets. You can immediately
remove big temporary objects instead of waiting for the function to do so at
the end.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested