how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to select text in pdf reader application control cloud windows azure web page class R%20dummies20-part981

Using internal functions
Writing your functions in such a way that they need objects in the global
environment doesn’t really make sense, because you use functions to avoid
dependency on objects in the global environment in the first place.
In fact, the whole concept behind R strongly opposes using global variables
used in different functions. As a functional programming language, one of the main
ideas of R is that the outcome of a function should not be dependent on anything
but the values for the arguments of that function. If you give the arguments the
same values, you always get the same result. If you come from other programming
languages like Java, this characteristic may strike you as odd, but it has its merits.
Sometimes you need to repeat some calculations a few times within a function, but
these calculations only make sense inside that function.
Suppose you want to compare the light production of some lamps at half
power and full power. The towels you put in front of the window to block the sun
out aren’t really up to the job, so you also measure how much light is still coming
through. You want to subtract the mean of this value from the results in order to
correct your measurements.
To calculate the efficiency at 50 percent power, you can use the following
function:
calculate.eff <- function(x, y, control){
min.base <- function(z) z - mean(control)
min.base(x) / min.base(y)
}
Inside the 
calculate.eff()
function, you see another function definition for a
min.base()
function. Exactly as in the case of other objects, this function is created
in the local environment of 
calculate.eff()
and destroyed again when the
function is done. You won’t find 
min.base()
back in the workspace.
You can use the function as follows:
> half <- c(2.23, 3.23, 1.48)
> full <- c(4.85, 4.95, 4.12)
> nothing <- c(0.14, 0.18, 0.56, 0.23)
> calculate.eff(half, full, nothing)
[1] 0.4270093 0.6318887 0.3129473
If you look a bit more closely at the function definition of 
min.base()
, you
How to select text in pdf reader - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
searching pdf files for text; make pdf text searchable
How to select text in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to select text in a pdf; how to select text in pdf and copy
notice that it uses an object 
control
but doesn’t have an argument with that name.
How does this work then? When you call the function, the following happens (see
Figure 8-2):
1. The function 
calculate.eff()
creates a new local environment that
contains the objects 
x
(with the value of 
fifty
), 
y
(with the value of 
hundred
),
control
(with the value of 
nothing
), as well as the function 
min.base()
.
2. The function 
min.base()
creates a new local environment within the one of
calculate.eff()
containing only one object 
z
with the value of 
x
.
3. 
min.base()
looks for the object 
control
in the environment of
calculate.eff()
and subtracts the mean of this vector from every number of 
z
.
This value is then returned.
4. The same thing happens again, but this time 
z
gets the value of 
y
.
5. Both results are divided by another, and the 
result
is passed on to the
global environment again.
The local environment is embedded in the environment where the function
is defined, not where it’s called. Suppose you use 
addPercent()
inside
calculate.eff()
to format the numbers. The local environment created by
addPercent()
is not embedded in the one of 
calculate.eff()
but in the global
environment, where 
addPercent()
is defined.
Figure 8-2: The relations between the environments of the functions 
calculate.eff
and
min.base
.
Dispatching to a Method
We want to cover one more thing about functions, because you need it to
understand how one function can give a different result based on the type of value
you give the arguments. R has a genius system, called the generic function system,
that allows you to call different functions using the same name. If you think this is
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
select text pdf file; how to search a pdf document for text
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
cannot select text in pdf; pdf text search
weird, think again about data frames and lists (see Chapter 7). If you print a list in
the console, you get the output arranged in rows. On the other hand, a data frame
is printed to the console arranged in columns. So, the 
print()
function treats lists
and data frames differently, but both times you used the same function. Or did you
really?
Finding the methods behind the function
It’s easy to find out if you used the same function both times — you can just
peek inside the function code of 
print()
by typing its name at the command line,
like this:
> print
function (x, ...)
UseMethod(“print”)
<bytecode: 0x0464f9e4>
<environment: namespace:base>
You can safely ignore the two last lines, because they refer to complicated
stuff in the “outer space” of R and are used only by R developers. But take a look at
the function body — it’s only one line!
Functions that don’t do much other than passing on objects to the right
function are called generic functions. In this example, 
print()
is a generic
function. The functions that do the actual work are called methods. So, every
method is a function, but not every function is a method.
Using methods with UseMethod
How on earth can that one line of code in the 
print()
function do so many
complex things like printing vectors, data frames, and lists all in a different way?
The answer is contained in the 
UseMethod()
function, which is the central function
in the generic function system of R. All 
UseMethod()
does is tell R to move along
and look for a function that can deal with the type of object that is given as the
argument 
x
.
R does that by looking through the complete set of functions in search of
another function that starts with 
print
followed by a dot and then the name of the
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. NET class without adobe reader installed. Provide
search text in pdf using java; convert pdf to searchable text
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
search a pdf file for text; cannot select text in pdf file
object type.
You can do that yourself by using the command 
apropos(‘print\\.’)
.
Between the quotation marks, you can put a regular expression much like in
the 
grep()
function we discuss in Chapter 5. In order to tell R that the dot
really means a dot, you have to precede it with two backslashes. Don’t be
surprised when you get over 40 different 
print()
functions for all kinds of
objects.
Suppose you have a data frame you want to print. R will look up the function
print.data.frame()
and use that function to print the object you passed as an
argument. You also can call that function yourself like this:
> small.one <- data.frame(a = 1:2, b = 2:1)
> print.data.frame(small.one)
a b
1 1 2
2 2 1
The effect of that function differs in no way from what you would get if you
used the generic 
print(small.one)
function instead. That’s because 
print()
will
give the 
small.one
to the 
print.data.frame()
function to take care of it.
Using default methods
In the case of a list, you may be tempted to look for a 
print.list()
function.
But it won’t work, because the 
print.list()
function doesn’t exist. Still that isn’t a
problem for R — R will ignore the type of the object in that case and just look for a
default method, 
print.default()
.
For many generic functions, there is a default method that’s used if no
specific method can be found. If there is one, you can recognize the default
method by the word default after the dot in the function name.
So, if you want to print the data frame as a list, you can use the default
method like this:
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
pdf editor with search and replace text; how to search text in pdf document
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
find and replace text in pdf file; search text in multiple pdf
> print.default(small.one)
$a
[1] 1 2
$b
[1] 2 1
attr(,”class”)
[1] “data.frame”
Doing it yourself
All that method dispatching sounds nice, but it may seem mostly like internal
affairs of R and not that interesting to know as a user . . . unless you could use that
system yourself, of course — and you can!
Adapting the addPercent function
Suppose you want to be able to paste the percent sign to character vectors
with the 
addPercent
function. As the function is written in the previous sections,
you can’t. A character vector will give an error the moment you try to multiply it, so
you need another function for that, like the following:
addPercent.character <- function(x){
paste(x,”%”,sep=””)
}
Note that the type of the object is not vector but character. In the same way,
you also have to rename the original 
addPercent
function to 
addPercent.numeric
in
your script.
If you use the system of method dispatching, you can keep all functions in
one script file if they aren’t too big. That way, you have to source only one
script file in order to have the whole generic system working.
Object-oriented programming (OOP) in R
The system of method dispatching described in this chapter is called S3, and
it’s only one of the ways you can work object oriented in R. If you’ve
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
how to select all text in pdf file; convert pdf to searchable text online
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
find text in pdf files; how to make a pdf document text searchable
programmed in an object-oriented language like Java or C++ before, be sure
to check out the options for OOP in R. The method dispatching here is only
the very start; the S4 methods and reference classes are far more powerful
and include many of the necessary principles of OOP, including constructors,
inheritance, and the like. But that’s a subject so complex that it could fill a
whole book.
Quite a big part of OOP in R is covered in R Programming for Bioinformatics,
by Robert Gentleman (Chapman and Hall/CRC), which we highly recommend.
All you need now is a generic 
addPercent()
function like this:
addPercent <- function(x,...){
UseMethod(“addPercent”)
}
You use only two arguments here: 
x
and the dots (
...
). The use of the dots
argument assures you can still use all the arguments from the
addPercent.numeric()
function in your call to 
addPercent()
. The extra arguments
are simply passed on to the appropriate method via the dots argument, as
explained in the “Using Arguments the Smart Way” section, earlier in this chapter.
After sending the complete script file to the console, you can send both
character vectors and numeric vectors to 
addPercent()
, like this:
> addPercent(new.numbers, FUN = floor)
[1] “82%”  “2%”   “162%” “40%”
> addPercent(letters[1:6])
[1] “a%” “b%” “c%” “d%” “e%” “f%”
Adding a default function
If you try to use the small data frame you made in the previous section, you
would get the following error:
> addPercent(small.one)
Error in UseMethod(“addPercent”) :
no applicable method for ‘addPercent’ applied to an object of class
“data.frame”
That’s a rather complicated way of telling you that there’s no method for a
data frame. There’s no need for a data frame method either, but it may be nice to
point out to the users of your code that they should use a vector instead. So, you
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
how to select text in pdf image; converting pdf to searchable text format
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
find text in pdf image; how to select text on pdf
can easily add a default method exactly like R does:
addPercent.default <- function(x){
cat(‘You should try a numeric or character vector.\n’)
}
This default method doesn’t do much apart from printing a message, but at
least that message is a bit easier to understand than the one R spits out.
Sometimes it’s apparent that the error messages of R aren’t always written with a
normal end-user in mind.
Chapter 9
Controlling the Logical Flow
In This Chapter
Making choices based on conditions
Looping over different values
Applying functions row-wise and column-wise
Applying functions over values, variables, and list elements
A function can be nothing more than a simple sequence of actions, but these
kinds of functions are highly inflexible. Often, you want to make choices and take
action dependent on a certain value.
Choices aren’t the only things that can be useful in functions. Loops can
prevent you from having to rewrite the same code over and over again. If you want
to calculate the summary statistics on different datasets, for example, you can
write the code to calculate those statistics and then tell R to carry out that code for
all the datasets you had in mind.
R has a very specific mechanism for looping over values that not only is
incredibly powerful, but also poses less trouble when you get the hang of it.
Instead of using a classic loop structure, you use a function to apply another
function on any of the objects discussed in the previous chapters. This way of
looping over values is one of the features that distinguishes R from many other
programming languages.
In this chapter, we cover the R tools to create loops and make decisions.
Note: If a piece of code is not preceded by a prompt (
>
), it represents an
example function that you can copy to your editor and then send to the console (as
explained in Chapter 2). All code you normally type directly at the command line is
preceded by a prompt.
Making Choices with if Statements
Defining a choice in your code is pretty simple: If this condition is true, then
carry out a certain task. Many programming languages let you do that with exactly
those words: if . . . then. R makes it even easier: You can drop the word then and
specify your choice in an 
if
statement.
An 
if
statement in R consists of three elements:
The keyword 
if
A single logical value between parentheses (or an expression that leads to a
single logical value)
A block of code between braces that has to be executed when the logical value
is 
TRUE
To show you how easy this is, let’s write a very small function,
priceCalculator()
, that calculates the price you charge to a customer based on
the hours of work you did for that customer. The function should take the number
of hours (
hours
) and the price per hour (
pph
) as input. The 
priceCalculator()
function could be something like this:
priceCalculator <- function(hours, pph=40){
net.price <- hours * pph
round(net.price)
}
Here’s what this code does:
With the 
function
keyword, you define the function.
Everything between the braces is the body of the function (see Chapter 8).
Between the parentheses, you specify the arguments 
hours
(without a default
value) and 
pph
(with a default value of $40 per hour).
You calculate the net price by multiplying 
hours
by 
pph
.
The outcome of the last statement in the body of your function is the returned
value. In this case, this is the total price rounded to the dollar.
You could drop the argument 
pph
and just multiply hours by 40. But that
would mean that if, for example, your colleague uses a different hourly rate,
he would have to change the value in the body of the function in order to be
able to use it. It’s good coding practice to use arguments with default values
for any value that can change. Doing so makes a function more flexible and
usable.
Now imagine you have some big clients that give you a lot of work. To keep
them happy, you decide to give them a reduction of 10 percent on the price per
hour for orders that involve more than 100 hours of work. So, if the number of
hours worked is larger than 100, you calculate the new price by multiplying the
price by 0.9. You can write that almost literally in your code like this:
priceCalculator <- function(hours, pph=40){
net.price <- hours * pph
if(hours > 100) {
net.price <- net.price * 0.9
}
round(net.price)
}
Copy this code in a script file, and send it to the console to make it available
for use. If you try out this function, you can see that the reduction is given only
when the number of hours is larger than 100:
> priceCalculator(hours = 55)
[1] 2200
> priceCalculator(hours = 110)
[1] 3960
An 
if
statement in R consists of three elements: the keyword 
if
, a single
logical value between parentheses, and a block of code between braces that
has to be executed when the logical value is 
TRUE
. If you look at the 
if
statement in the previous function, you find these three elements. Between
the parentheses, you find an expression (
hours > 100
) that evaluates to a
single logical value. Between the braces stands one line of code that reduces
the net price by 10 percent when the line is carried out.
This construct is the most general way you can specify an 
if
statement. But
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested