how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Convert pdf to word searchable text control SDK platform web page winforms .net web browser R%20dummies21-part982

if you have only one short line of code in the code block, you don’t have to put
braces around it. You can change the complete 
if
statement in the function
with the following line:
if(hours > 100) net.price <- net.price * 0.9
The usual way of getting help on a function named, for example, 
fun.name
(
?fun.name
) does not work for 
if
. To access the built-in help for 
if
, you have
to quote the function name. You can use single quotes, double quotes, or
backticks. Each of the following statements takes you to the Help page for 
if
:
?’if’
?”if”
?`if`
Doing Something Else with an if...else Statement
In some cases, you need your function to do something if a condition is true
and something else if it is not. You could do this with two 
if
statements, but
there’s an easier way in R: an 
if...else
statement. An 
if…else
statement contains
the same elements as an 
if
statement (see the preceding section), and then some
extra:
The keyword 
else
, placed after the first code block
A second block of code, contained within braces, that has to be carried out if and
only if the result of the condition in the 
if()
statement is 
FALSE
In some countries, the amount of value added tax (VAT) that has to be paid
on certain services depends on whether the client is a public or private
organization. Imagine that public organizations have to pay only 6 percent VAT and
private organizations have to pay 12 percent VAT. You can add an extra argument
public
to the 
priceCalculator()
function and adopt it as follows to add the correct
amount of VAT:
priceCalculator <- function(hours, pph=40, public=TRUE){
net.price <- hours * pph
if(hours > 100) net.price <- net.price * 0.9
if(public) {
tot.price <- net.price * 1.06
} else {
Convert pdf to word searchable text - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert pdf to word searchable text; how to select all text in pdf file
Convert pdf to word searchable text - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search pdf files for text; make pdf text searchable
tot.price <- net.price * 1.12
}
round(tot.price)
}
If you send this code to the console, you can test the function. For example, if
you worked for 25 hours, the following code gives you the different amounts you
charge for public and private organizations, respectively:
> priceCalculator(25,public=TRUE)
[1] 1060
> priceCalculator(25,public=FALSE)
[1] 1120
This works well, but how does it work?
If you look at the 
if...else
statement in the previous function, you find these
elements. If the value of the argument 
public
is 
TRUE
, the total price is calculated
as 1.06 times the net price. Otherwise, the total price is 1.12 times the net price.
The 
if
statement needs a logical value between the parentheses. Any
expression you put between the parentheses is evaluated before it’s passed on
to the 
if
statement. So, if you work with a logical value directly, you don’t
have to specify an expression at all. Using, for example, 
if(public == TRUE)
is
about as redundant as asking if white snow is white. It would work, but it’s bad
coding practice.
Also, in the case of an 
if...else
statement you can drop the braces if both
code blocks exist of only a single line of code. So, you could just forget about the
braces and squeeze the whole 
if...else
statement on a single line. Or you could
even write it like this:
if(public) tot.price <- net.price * 1.06 else
tot.price <- net.price * 1.12
Putting the 
else
statement at the end of a line and not the beginning of the
next one is a good idea. In general, R reads multiple lines as a single line as
long as it’s absolutely clear that the command isn’t finished yet (see Chapter
3). If you put 
else
at the beginning of the second line, R considers the first line
finished and complains. You can put 
else
at the beginning of a next line only if
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
RasterEdge also provides other industry-leading methods to convert target PDF code, such as, PDF to HTML converter assembly, PDF to Word converter assembly
pdf text search; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. RasterEdge.XDoc.Word. dll. ' pdf convert to txt DocumentConverter.ToDocument("C:\\test.pdf", "C
search a pdf file for text; search pdf for text
you do so within a function and you source the complete file at once to R.
But you can still make this shorter. The 
if
statement works like a function
and, hence, it also returns a value. As a result, you can assign that value to an
object or use it in calculations. So, instead of recalculating 
net.price
and assigning
the result to 
tot.price
within the code blocks, you can use the 
if...else
statement like this:
tot.price <- net.price * if(public) 1.06 else 1.12
R will first evaluate the 
if...else
statement, and multiply the outcome by
net.price
. The result of this is then assigned to 
tot.price
. This differs not one iota
from the result of the five lines of code we used for the original 
if...else
statement. R allows programmers to be incredibly lazy, er, economical here.
Vectorizing Choices
As we discuss in Chapter 4, vectorization is one of the defining attributes of
the R language. R wouldn’t be R if it didn’t have some kind of vectorized version of
an 
if...else
statement. If you wonder why on earth you would need such a thing,
take a look at the problem discussed in this section.
Looking at the problem
The 
priceCalculator()
function still isn’t very economical to use. If you have
100 clients, you’ll have to calculate the price for every client separately. Check for
yourself what happens if you add, for example, three different amounts of hours as
an argument:
> priceCalculator(c(25,110))
[1] 1060 4664
Warning message:
In if (hours > 100) net.price <- net.price * 0.9 :
the condition has length > 1 and only the first element will be used
Not only does R warn you that something fishy is going on, but the result you
get is plain wrong. Instead of $4,664, the second client should be charged only
$4,198:
> priceCalculator(110)
[1] 4198
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
Convert PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET webpage. Create high quality Word documents from both scanned PDF and searchable PDF files without losing
how to make a pdf file text searchable; pdf find text
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Word
C# users can convert Convert Microsoft Office Word to searchable PDF online, create multi Word text is searchable when users use Word text search
cannot select text in pdf; pdf text searchable
What happened? The warning message should give you a fair idea about what
went on. An 
if
statement can deal only with a single value, but the expression
hours > 100
returns two values, as shown by the following code:
>  c(25, 110) > 100
[1] FALSE  TRUE
Choosing based on a logical vector
The solution you’re looking for is the 
ifelse()
function, which is a vectorized
way of choosing values from two vectors. This remarkable function takes three
arguments:
A test vector with logical values
A vector with values that should be returned if the corresponding value in the
test vector is 
TRUE
A vector with values that should be returned if the corresponding value in the
test vector is 
FALSE
Understanding how it works
Take a look at the following trivial example:
> ifelse(c(1,3) < 2.5 , 1:2 , 3:4)
[1] 1 4
To understand how it works, run over the steps the function takes:
1. The conditional expression 
c(1,3) < 2.5
is evaluated to a logical
vector.
2. The first value of this vector is 
TRUE
, because 1 is smaller than 2.5.
So, the first value of the result is the first value of the second argument,
which is 1.
3. The next value is 
FALSE
, because 3 is larger than 2.5. Hence,
ifelse()
takes the second value of the third argument (which is 4) as the
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert Word to PDF file with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
pdf text search tool; search pdf for text in multiple files
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
and more companies are trying to convert printed business you are executing character and word recognition. Texts will be outputted as searchable PDF, PDF/A,TXT
pdf search and replace text; search text in pdf image
second value of the result.
4. A vector with the selected values is returned as the result.
Trying it out
To see how this works in the example of the 
priceCalculator()
function, try
the function out at the command line in the console. Say you have two clients and
you worked 25 and 110 hours for them, respectively. You can calculate the net
price with the following code:
> my.hours <- c(25,110)
> my.hours * 40 * ifelse(my.hours > 100, 0.9, 1)
[1] 1000 3960
Didn’t you just read that the second and third arguments should be a vector?
Yes, but the 
ifelse()
function can recycle its arguments. And that’s exactly what it
does here. In the preceding 
ifelse()
function call, you translate the logical vector
created by the expression 
my.hours > 100
into a vector containing the numbers 0.9
and 1 in lieu of 
TRUE
and 
FALSE
, respectively.
Adapting the function
Of course, you need to adapt the 
priceCalculator()
function in such a way
that you also can input a vector with values for the argument 
public
. Otherwise,
you wouldn’t be able to calculate the prices for a mixture of public and private
clients. The final function looks like this:
priceCalculator <- function(hours,pph=40,public){
net.price <- hours * pph
net.price <- net.price * ifelse(hours > 100 , 0.9, 1)
tot.price <- net.price * ifelse(public, 1.06, 1.12)
round(price)
}
Next, create a little data frame to test the function. For example:
> clients <- data.frame(
+  hours = c(25, 110, 125, 40),
+  public = c(TRUE,TRUE,FALSE,FALSE)
+)
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Best C#.NET component to create searchable PDF document from Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Create writable PDF from text (.txt) file.
pdf editor with search and replace text; how to select text in a pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Easy to create searchable and scanned PDF files from Word. Convert to PDF with embedded fonts or without original fonts fast.
select text in pdf reader; pdf make text searchable
You can use this data frame now as arguments for the 
priceCalculator()
function, like this:
> with(clients, priceCalculator(hours, public = public))
[1] 1060 4198 5040 1792
There you go. Problem solved!
Making Multiple Choices
The 
if
and 
if...else
statements you use in the previous section leave you
with exactly two options, but life is seldom as simple as that. Imagine you have
some clients abroad.
Let’s assume that any client abroad doesn’t need to pay VAT for the sake of
the example. This leaves you now with three different VAT rates: 12 percent for
private clients, 6 percent for public clients, and none for foreign clients.
Chaining if...else statements
The most intuitive way to solve this problem is just to chain the choices. If a
client is living abroad, don’t charge any VAT. Otherwise, check whether the client is
public or private and apply the relevant VAT rate.
If you define an argument 
client
for your function that can take the values
‘abroad’
‘public’
, and 
‘private’
, you could code the previous algorithm like this:
if(client==’private’){
tot.price <- net.price * 1.12      # 12% VAT
} else {
if(client==’public’){
tot.price <- net.price * 1.06    # 6% VAT
} else {
tot.price <- net.price * 1    # 0% VAT
}
}
With this code, you nest the second 
if...else
statement in the first 
if...else
statement. That’s perfectly acceptable and it will work, but imagine what you
would have to do if you had four or even more possibilities. Nesting a statement in
a statement in a statement in a statement quickly creates one huge curly mess.
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
Why do we need to convert PDF document to HTML webpage One is that compared with HTML file, PDF file (a not be easily edited), is less searchable for search
how to select text in pdf image; select text pdf file
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
library also makes PDF document visible and searchable on the Internet by converting PDF document file to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to
text searchable pdf; text searchable pdf file
Luckily, R allows you to write all that code a bit more clearly. You can chain
the 
if...else
statements as follows:
if(client==’private’){
tot.price <- net.price * 1.12
} else if(client==’public’){
tot.price <- net.price * 1.06
} else {
tot.price <- net.price
}
In this example, the chaining makes a difference of only two braces, but when
you have more possibilities, it really makes the difference between readable code
and sleepless nights. Note, also, that you don’t have to test whether the argument
client
is equal to 
‘abroad’
(although it wouldn’t be wrong to do that). You just
assume that if 
client
doesn’t have any of the two other values, it has to be
‘abroad’
.
Chained 
if...else
statements work on a single value at a time. You can’t
use these chained 
if...else
statements in a vectorized way. For that, you can
nest multiple 
ifelse
statements, like this:
VAT <- ifelse(client==’private’, 1.12,
ifelse(client == ‘public’, 1.06, 1)
)
tot.price <- net.price * VAT
This piece of code can become quite confusing if you have more than three
choices, though. The solution to this is to switch.
Switching between possibilities
The nested 
if...else
statement is especially useful if you have complete code
blocks that have to be carried out when a condition is met. But if you need to
select values based only on a condition, there’s a better option: Use the 
switch()
function.
Making choices with switch
In the previous example, you wanted to adjust the VAT rate depending on
whether the client is a public one, is a private one, or lives abroad. You have a list
of three possible choices, and for each choice you have a specific VAT rate. You can
use the 
switch()
function like this:
VAT <- switch(client, private=1.12, public=1.06, abroad=1)
You construct a 
switch()
call as follows:
1. Give a single value as the first argument (in this case, the value of
client
).
Note that 
switch()
isn’t vectorized, so it can’t deal with vectors as a first
argument.
2. After the first argument, you give a list of choices with the
respected values.
Note that you don’t have to put quotation marks around the choices.
Remember that 
switch()
doesn’t work in a vectorized way. You can
distinguish the choices more easily, however, so the code becomes more
readable.
In fact, the first argument doesn’t have to be a value; it can be some
expression that evaluates to either a character vector or a number. In case you
work with numbers, you don’t even have to use 
choice=value
in the function
call. If you have integers, 
switch()
will return the option in that position. In
the statement 
switch(2,’some value’, ‘something else’, ‘some more’)
, the
result is 
‘something else’
. You can find more information and examples on
the Help page 
?switch
.
Using default values in switch
You don’t have to specify all options in a 
switch()
call. If you want to have a
certain result in case the matched value is not among the specified options, put
that result as the last option, without any choice before it. So, the following line of
code does exactly the same thing as the nested 
ifelse
call from “Chaining if...else
statements” section, earlier in this chapter:
VAT <- switch(client, private=1.12, public=1.06, 1)
You can easily test this out in the console by creating an object called
client
with a certain value and then running the 
switch()
call, as in the
following example:
> client <- ‘other’
> switch(client, private=1.12, public=1.06, 1)
[1] 1
You can give 
client
different values to see how 
switch()
works.
Looping Through Values
In the previous section, you use a couple different methods to make choices.
Many of these methods aren’t vectorized, so you can use only a single value to
base your choice on. You could, of course, apply that code on each value you have
by hand, but it makes far more sense to automate this task.
Constructing a for loop
As in many other programming languages, you repeat an action for every
value in a vector by using a 
for
loop. You construct a 
for
loop in R as follows:
for(i in values){
... do something ...
}
This 
for
loop consists of the following parts:
The keyword 
for
, followed by parentheses.
An identifier between the parentheses. In this example, we use 
i
, but that can
be any object name you like.
The keyword 
in
, which follows the identifier.
A vector with values to loop over. In this example code, we use the object
values
, but that again can be any vector you have available.
A code block between braces that has to be carried out for every value in the
object 
values
.
In the code block, you can use the identifier. Each time R loops through the
code, R assigns the next value in the vector with values to the identifier.
Calculating values in a for loop
Let’s take another look at the 
priceCalculator()
function (refer to the
“Making Multiple Choices” section, earlier in this chapter). Earlier, we show you a
few possibilities to adapt this function so you can apply a different VAT rate for
public, private, and foreign clients. You can’t use any of these options in a
vectorized way, but you can use a 
for
loop so the function can calculate the price
for multiple clients at once.
Using the values of the vector
Adapt the 
priceCalculator()
function as follows:
priceCalculator <- function(hours, pph=40, client){
net.price <- hours * pph *
ifelse(hours > 100, 0.9, 1)
VAT <- numeric(0)
for(i in client){
VAT <- c(VAT,switch(i, private=1.12, public=1.06, 1))
}
tot.price <- net.price * VAT
round(tot.price)
}
The first and the last part of the function haven’t changed, but in the middle
section, you do the following:
1. Create a numeric vector with length 0 and call it 
VAT
.
2. For every value in the vector client, apply 
switch()
to select the
correct amount of VAT to be paid.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested