how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to search text in pdf document application SDK tool html wpf azure online R%20dummies22-part983

3. In each round through the loop, add the outcome of 
switch()
at the
end of the vector 
VAT
.
The result is a vector 
VAT
that contains, for each client, the correct VAT that
needs to be applied. You can test this by adding, for example, a variable 
type
to
the data frame clients you created in the previous section like this:
> clients$type <- c(‘public’,’abroad’,’private’,’abroad’)
> priceCalculator(clients$hours, client=clients$type)
[1] 1060 3960 5040 1600
Using loops and indices
The function from the previous section works, but you can write more efficient
code if you loop not over the values but over the indices. To do so, you replace the
middle section in the function with the following code:
nclient <- length(client)
VAT <- numeric(nclient)
for(i in seq_along(client)){
VAT[i] <- switch(client[i], private=1.12, public=1.06, 1))
}
This code acts very similar to the previous one, but there are a few
differences:
You assign the length of the vector 
client
to the variable 
nclient
.
Then you make a numeric vector 
VAT
that is exactly as long as the vector
client
. This is called pre-allocation of a vector.
Then you loop over indices of client instead of the vector itself by using the
function 
seq_along()
. In the first pass through the loop, the first value in 
VAT
is
set to be the result of 
switch()
applied to the first value in 
client
. In the
second pass, the second value of 
VAT
is the result of 
switch()
applied to the
second value in 
client
and so on.
You may be tempted to replace 
seq_along(client)
with the vector
1:nclient
, but that would be a bad idea. If the vector 
client
has a length of
0, 
seq_along(client)
creates an empty vector and the code in the loop never
How to search text in pdf document - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; convert pdf to searchable text online
How to search text in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
select text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf
executes. If you use 
1:nclient
, R creates a vector 
c(1,0)
and loop over those
two values, giving you a completely wrong result.
Doing more with loops — and when not to do so
R contains some of the mechanisms used in other programming languages to
manipulate loops:
The keyword 
next
, to skip to the next iteration of a loop without
running the remaining code in the code block
The keyword 
break
, to break out of a loop at any given point
The keyword 
while
, to construct a loop that continues as long as a
certain condition is 
TRUE
.
You find more information on the use of these keywords on the Help page 
?
Control
.
Although you can technically use all three options, they’re not often used.
Many programmers consider the use of 
break
and 
next
to be bad coding
practice in any language.
For 
while
, the situation is a bit more complex. A 
while
loop is useful only in
very specific cases, like when you generate artificial data that has to meet
certain conditions or when you write your own optimization algorithms. But
in many cases the built-in optimization functions like 
optim()
optimize()
,
and 
nlm()
work faster than a 
while
loop — and often more stable. These
functions require a bit of study before you can apply them, but studying the
Help pages 
?optim
?optimize
, and 
?nlm
, as well as related pages, can really
pay off.
Every time you lengthen an object in R, R has to copy the whole object and
move it to a new place in the memory. This has two effects: First, it slows
down your code, because all the copying takes time. Second, as R continuously
moves things around in memory, this memory gets split up in a lot of small
spaces. This is called fragmentation, and it makes the communication between
R and the memory less smooth. You can avoid this fragmentation by pre-
allocating memory as in the previous example.
Looping without Loops: Meeting the Apply Family
Using 
for
loops has some important side effects that some people would call
serious drawbacks. For one, the objects you create in the 
for
loop stay in the
workspace afterward. Objects you change in the 
for
loop are changed in the
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
pdf searchable text converter; pdf text select tool
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
cannot select text in pdf file; search multiple pdf files for text
workspace. This may be exactly what you’re trying to do, but more often than not,
this is an unwanted side effect of the way 
for
loops are implemented in R.
Take a look at the following trivial example:
> songline <- ‘Get out of my dreams...’
> for(songline in 1:5) print(‘...Get into my car!’)
Contrary to what you may expect, after running this code, the value of
songline
is not the string 
‘Get out of my dreams...’
, but the number 
5
, as shown
in the output below:
> songline
[1] 5
Although you never explicitly changed the value of 
songline
anywhere in the
code, R does so implicitly when carrying out the 
for
loop. Every iteration, R
reassigns the next value from the vector to 
songline
. . . in the workspace! By
choosing the names of the variables and the identifier wisely, you can avoid
running into this kind of trouble. But when writing large scripts, you need to do
some serious bookkeeping for the names, and making mistakes becomes all too
easy.
To be completely correct, using a 
for
loop has an effect on the environment
you work in at that moment. If you just use the 
for
loop in scripts that you run
in the console, the effects will take place in the workspace. If you use a 
for
loop in the body of the function, the effects will take place within the
environment of that function. For more information, see Chapter 8.
Here’s the good news: R has another looping system that’s very powerful,
that’s at least as fast as 
for
loops (and sometimes much faster), and — most
important of all — that doesn’t have the side effects of a 
for
loop. Actually, this
system consists of a complete family of related functions, known as the apply
family. This family contains seven functions, all ending with 
apply
.
Looking at the family features
Before you start using any of the functions in the apply family, here are the
most important properties of these functions:
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
find text in pdf files; text select tool pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
converting pdf to searchable text format; how to select all text in pdf
Every one of the apply functions takes at least two arguments: an object and
another function. You pass the function as an argument (see Chapter 8).
None of these apply functions has side effects. This is the main reason to use
them, so we can’t stress it enough: If you can use any apply function instead of
for
loop, use the apply solution. Be aware, though, that possible side effects
of the applied function are not taken care of by the apply family.
Every apply function can pass on arguments to the function that is given as an
argument. It does that using the 
dots
argument (see Chapter 8).
Every function of the apply family always returns a result. Using the apply family
makes sense only if you need that result. If you want to print messages to the
console with 
print()
or 
cat() 
for example, there’s no point in using the apply
family for that.
Meeting three of the members
Say hello to 
apply()
sapply()
, and 
lapply()
, the most used members of the
apply family. Every one of these functions applies another function to all elements
in an object. What those elements are depends on the object and the function.
Table 9-1 provides an overview of the objects that each of these three functions
works on, what each function sees as an element, and which objects each function
can return. We explain how to use these functions in the remainder of this chapter.
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
how to search text in pdf document; search text in pdf using java
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
select text in pdf; find and replace text in pdf
Applying functions on rows and columns
In Chapter 7, you calculate the sum of a matrix with the 
rowSums()
function.
You can do the same for means with the 
rowMeans()
function, and you have the
related functions 
colSums()
and 
colMeans()
to calculate the sum and the mean for
each column. But R doesn’t have similar functions for every operation you want to
carry out. Luckily, you can use the 
apply()
function to apply a function over every
row or column of a matrix or data frame.
Counting birds
Imagine you counted the birds in your backyard on three different days and
stored the counts in a matrix like this:
> counts <- matrix(c(3,2,4,6,5,1,8,6,1), ncol=3)
> colnames(counts) <- c(‘sparrow’,’dove’,’crow’)
> counts
sparrow dove crow
[1,]       3    6    8
[2,]       2    5    6
[3,]       4    1    1
Each column represents a different species, and each row represents a
different day. Now you want to know the maximum count per species on any given
day. You could construct a 
for
loop to do so, but using 
apply()
, you do this in only
one line of code:
> apply(counts, 2, max)
sparrow    dove    crow
4       6       8
The 
apply()
function returns a vector with the maximum for each column and
conveniently uses the column names as names for this vector as well. If R doesn’t
find names for the dimension over which 
apply()
runs, it returns an unnamed
object instead.
Let’s take a look at how this 
apply()
function works. In the previous lines of
code, you used three arguments:
The object on which the function has to be applied: In this case, it’s the
matrix 
counts
.
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
search pdf files for text programmatically; how to make a pdf document text searchable
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option. 'Open a document Dim doc As
how to select text in pdf and copy; how to search a pdf document for text
The dimension or index over which the function has to be applied: The
number 
1
means row-wise, and the number 
2
means column-wise. Here, we
apply the function over the columns. In the case of more-dimensional arrays,
this index can be larger than 
2
.
The name of the function that has to be applied: You can use quotation
marks around the function name, but you don’t have to. Here, we apply the
function 
max
. Note that there are no parentheses needed after the function
name.
The 
apply()
function splits up the matrix (or data frame) in rows (or
columns). Remember that if you select a single row or column, R will, by
default, simplify that to a vector. The 
apply()
function then uses these vectors
one by one as an argument to the function you specified. So, the applied
function needs to be able to deal with vectors.
Adding extra arguments
Let’s go back to our example from the preceding section: Imagine you didn’t
look for doves the second day. This means that, for that day, you don’t have any
data, so you have to set that value to 
NA
like this:
> counts[2, 2] <- NA
If you apply the 
max
function on the columns of this matrix, you get the
following result:
> apply(counts,2,max)
sparrow    dove    crow
4      NA       8
That’s not what you want. In order to deal with the missing values, you need
to pass the argument 
na.rm
to the 
max
function in the 
apply()
call (see Chapter 4).
Luckily, this is easily done in R. You just have to add all extra arguments to the
function as extra arguments of the 
apply()
call, like this:
> apply(counts, 2, max, na.rm=TRUE)
sparrow    dove    crow
4       6       8
You can pass any arguments you want to the function in the 
apply()
call by
just adding them between the parentheses after the first three arguments.
Applying functions to listlike objects
The 
apply()
function works on anything that has dimensions, but what if you
don’t have dimensions (for example, when you have a list or a vector)? For that,
you have two related functions from the apply family at your disposal: 
sapply()
and 
lapply()
. The l in 
lapply
stands for list, and the s in 
sapply
stands for simplify.
The two functions work basically the same — the only difference is that 
lapply()
always returns a list with the result, whereas 
sapply()
tries to simplify the final
object if possible.
Applying a function to a vector
As you can see in Table 9-1, both 
sapply()
and 
lapply()
consider every value
in the vector to be an element on which they can apply a function. Many functions
in R work in a vectorized way, so there’s often no need to use this.
Using switch on vectors
The 
switch()
function, however, doesn’t work in a vectorized way. Consider
the following basic example:
> sapply(c(‘a’,’b’), switch, a=’Hello’, b=’Goodbye’)
a         b
“Hello” “Goodbye”
The 
sapply()
call works very similar to the 
apply()
call from the previous
section, although you don’t have an argument that specifies the index. Here’s a
recap:
The first argument is the vector on which values you want to apply the function
— in this case, the vector 
c(‘a’, ‘b’)
.
The second argument is the name of the function — in this case, 
switch
.
All other arguments are simply the arguments you pass to the 
switch
function.
The 
sapply()
function now takes first the value 
‘a’
and then the value 
‘b’
as
the first argument to 
switch()
, using the arguments 
a=’Hello’
and 
b=’Goodbye’
each time as the other arguments. It combines both results into a vector and uses
the values of 
c(‘a’, ‘b’)
as names for the resulting vector.
The 
sapply()
function has an argument 
USE.NAMES
that you can set to 
FALSE
if you don’t want 
sapply()
to use character values as names for the result. For
details about this argument, see the Help page 
?sapply
.
Replacing a complete for loop with a single statement
In the “Calculating values in a for loop” section, earlier in this chapter, you use
for
loop to apply the 
switch()
function on all values passed through the
argument 
client
. Although that trick works nicely, you can replace the pre-
allocation and the loop with one simple statement, like this:
priceCalculator <- function(hours, pph=40, client){
net.price <- hours * pph * ifelse(hours > 100, 0.9, 1)
VAT <- sapply(client, switch, private=1.12, public=1.06, 1)
tot.price <- net.price * VAT
round(tot.price)
}
Applying a function to a data frame
You also can use 
sapply()
on lists and data frames. In this case, 
sapply()
applies the specified function on every element in that list. Because data frames
are lists as well, everything in this section applies to both lists and data frames.
Imagine that you want to know which type of variables you have in your data
frame 
clients
. For a vector, you can use the 
class()
function to find out the type.
In order to know this for all variables of the data frame at once, you simply apply
the 
class()
function to every variable by using 
sapply()
like this:
> sapply(clients,class)
hours      public        type
“numeric”   “logical” “character”
R returns a named vector that gives you the types of every variable, and it
uses the names of the variables as names for the vector. In case you use a named
list, R uses the names of the list elements as names for the vector.
Simplifying results (or not) with sapply
The 
sapply()
function doesn’t always return a vector. In fact, the standard
output of 
sapply
is a list, but that list gets simplified to either a matrix or a vector if
possible.
If the result of the applied function on every element of the list or vector is a
single number, 
sapply()
simplifies the result to a vector.
If the result of the applied function on every element of the list or vector is a
vector with exactly the same length, 
sapply()
simplifies the result to a matrix.
In all other cases, 
sapply()
returns a (named) list with the results.
Say you want to know the unique values of every variable in the data frame
clients
. To get all unique values in a vector, you use the 
unique()
function. You
can get the result you want by applying that function to the data frame 
clients
like this:
> sapply(clients, unique)
$hours
[1]  25 110 125  40
$public
[1]  TRUE FALSE
$type
[1] “public”  “abroad”  “private”
In the variable 
hours
, you find four unique values; in the variable 
public
, only
two; and in the variable 
type
, three. Because the lengths of the result differ for
every variable, 
sapply()
can’t simplify the result, so it returns a named list.
Getting lists using lapply
The 
lapply()
function works exactly the same as the 
sapply()
function,
with one important difference: It always returns a list. This trait can be
beneficial if you’re not sure what the outcome of 
sapply()
will be.
Say you want to know the unique values of only a subset of the data frame
clients
. You can get the unique values in the first and third rows of the data frame
like this:
> sapply(clients[c(1,3), ], unique)
hours public  type
[1,] “25”  “TRUE”  “public”
[2,] “125” “FALSE” “private”
But because every variable now has two unique values, 
sapply()
simplifies the
result to a matrix. If you counted on the result to be a list in the following code,
you would get errors. If you used 
lapply()
, on the other hand, you would also get
a list in this case, as shown in the following output:
> lapply(clients[c(1,3), ], unique)
$hours
[1]  25 125
$public
[1]  TRUE FALSE
$type
[1] “public”  “private”
Actually, the 
sapply()
function has an extra argument, 
simplify
, that you
can set to 
FALSE
if you don’t want a simplified list. If you set both the
arguments 
simplify
and 
USE.NAMES
to 
FALSE
sapply()
and 
lapply()
return
exactly the same result. For details on the difference between the two
functions, look at the Help file 
?sapply
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested