how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Select text in pdf reader software control cloud windows azure web page class R%20dummies23-part984

Chapter 10
Debugging Your Code
In This Chapter
Discovering what warnings tell you
Reading errors correctly
Finding the bugs in your code
Optimizing your debugging strategies
To err is human, and programmers fall into that “human” category as well
(even though we like to believe otherwise!). Nobody manages to write code
without errors, so instead of wondering if you have errors in your code, you should
ask yourself where you have errors in your code. In this chapter, you discover some
general strategies and specific tools to find that out.
Knowing What to Look For
A bug is simply another word for some kind of error in your program. So,
debugging doesn’t involve insecticides — it just means getting rid of all type of
semantic and/or logical errors in your functions.
Before you start hunting down bugs, you have to know what you’re looking for.
In general, you can divide errors in your code into three different categories:
Syntax errors: If you write code that R can’t understand, you have syntax
errors. Syntax errors always result in an error message and often are caused by
misspelling a function or forgetting a bracket.
Semantic errors: If you write correct code that doesn’t do what you think it
does, you have a semantic error. The code itself is correct, but the outcome of
that line of code is not. It may, for example, return another type of object than
you expect. If you use that object further on, it won’t be the type you think it is
and your code will fail there.
Logic errors: Probably the hardest-to-find are errors in the logic of your code.
Your code works, it doesn’t generate any error or warning, but it still doesn’t
Select text in pdf reader - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to make pdf text searchable; search pdf documents for text
Select text in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf find highlighted text; search text in multiple pdf
return the result you expect. The mistake is not in the code itself, but in the
logic it executes.
This may seem like a small detail, but finding different types of bugs requires
different strategies. Often, you can easily locate a syntax error by simply reading
the error messages, but semantic errors pose a whole different challenge and logic
errors can hide in your code without your being aware they exist.
Reading Errors and Warnings
If something goes wrong with your code, R tells you. That can happen in two
ways:
The code keeps on running until the end, and when the code is finished, R prints
out a warning message.
The code stops immediately because R can’t carry it out, and R prints out an
error message.
We have to admit it: These error messages can range from mildly confusing to
completely incomprehensible if you’re not used to them. But it doesn’t have to stay
that way. When you get familiar with the error and warning messages from R, you
can quickly tell what’s wrong.
Reading error messages
Let’s take a look at such an error message. If you try the following code, you
get this more or less clear error message:
> “a” + 1
Error in “a” + 1 : non-numeric argument to binary operator
You get two bits of information in this error message. First, the line 
“a” + 1
tells you in which line of code you have an error. Then it tells you what the error is.
In this case, you used a non-numeric argument (the character 
‘a’
): In combination
with a binary operator (the 
+
sign).
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
pdf select text; pdf searchable text
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
searching pdf files for text; pdf find and replace text
R always tells you in which code the error occurs, so you know in many
cases where you have to start looking.
Error messages aren’t always that clear. Take a look at the following example:
> data.frame(1:10,10:1,)
Error in data.frame(1:10, 10:1, ) : argument is missing, with no default
To what argument does this error refer? Actually, it refers to an empty
argument you provided for the function. After the second vector, there’s a comma
that shouldn’t be there. A small typing error, but R expects another argument after
that comma and doesn’t find one.
If you don’t immediately understand an error message, take a closer look at
the things the error message is talking about. Chances are, you just typed
something wrong there.
Caring about warnings (or not)
You can’t get around errors, because they just stop your code. Warnings on
the other hand are a whole different beast. Even if R throws a warning, it continues
to execute the code regardless. So, you can ignore warnings, but in general that’s a
pretty bad idea. Warnings often are the only sign you have that your code has
some semantic or logic error.
For example, you could’ve forgotten about the 
ifelse()
function discussed in
Chapter 9 and tried something like the following example:
> x <- 1:10
> y <- if (x < 5 ) 0 else 1
Warning message:
In if (x < 5) 0 else 1 :
the condition has length > 1 and only the first element will be used
This warning points at a semantic error: 
if
expects a single 
TRUE
or 
FALSE
value, but you provided a whole vector. Note that, just like errors, warnings tell you
in general which code has generated the warning.
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Free online C# source code to erase text from adobe PDF file in Visual Studio. NET class without adobe reader installed. Provide
how to make a pdf file text searchable; convert pdf to searchable text online
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; C#; XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
how to select text in pdf; how to search pdf files for text
Here is another warning that pops up regularly and may point to a semantic or
logic error in your code:
> x <- 4
> sqrt(x - 5)
[1] NaN
Warning message:
In sqrt(x - 5) : NaNs produced
Because 
x - 5
is negative when 
x
is 4, R cannot calculate the square root and
warns you that the square root of a negative number is not a number (
NaN
).
If you’re a mathematician, you may point out that the square root of –1 is 
0
- 1i
. R can, in fact, do calculations on complex numbers, but then you have to
define your variables as complex numbers. You can check, for example, the
Help file 
?complex
for more information.
Although most warnings result from either semantic or logic errors in your
code, even a simple syntax error can generate a warning instead of an error. If you
want to plot some points in R, you use the 
plot()
function, as shown in Chapter
16. It takes an argument 
col
to specify the color of the points, but you could
mistakenly try to color the points using the following:
> plot(1:10, 10:1, color=’green’)
If you try this, you get six warning messages at once, all telling you that 
color
is probably not the argument name you were looking for:
Warning messages:
1: In plot.window(...) : “color” is not a graphical parameter
2: In plot.xy(xy, type, ...) : “color” is not a graphical parameter
....
Notice that the warning messages don’t point toward the code you typed at
the command line; instead, they point to functions you never used before, like
plot.window()
and 
plot.xy()
. Remember: You can pass arguments from one
function to another using the dots argument (see Chapter 8). That’s exactly what
plot()
does here. So, 
plot()
itself doesn’t generate a warning, but every function
that 
plot()
passes the 
color
argument to does.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
pdf search and replace text; find text in pdf files
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. XDoc.Tiff. XDoc.Dicom. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool.
how to select all text in pdf; pdf make text searchable
If you get warning or error messages, a thorough look at the Help pages of
the function(s) that generated the error can help in determining what the
reason is for the message you got. For example, at the Help page of 
?plot.xy
,
you find that the correct name for the argument is 
col
.
So, to summarize, most warnings point to one of the following problems:
The function gave you a result, but for some reason that result may not be
correct.
The function generated an atypical outcome, like 
NA
or 
NaN
values.
The function couldn’t deal with some of the arguments and ignored them.
Only the last one tells you there’s a problem with your syntax. For the other
ones, you have to examine your code a bit more.
Going Bug Hunting
Although the error message always tells you which line of code generates the
error, it may not be the line of code where things started going wrong. This makes
bug hunting a complex business, but some simple strategies can help you track
down these pesky creatures.
Calculating the logit
To illustrate some bug-hunting strategies in R, we use a simple example. Say,
for example, your colleague wrote two functions to calculate the logit from both
proportions and percentages, but he can’t get them to work. So, he asks you to
help find the bugs. Here’s the code he sends you:
# checks input and does logit calculation
logit <- function(x){
x <- ifelse(x < 0 | x > 1, “NA”, x)
log(x / (1 - x) )
}
# transforms percentage to number and calls logit
logitpercent <- function(x){
x <- gsub(“%”, “”, x)
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
search text in pdf using java; search pdf documents for text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V
pdf find and replace text; pdf text select tool
logit(as.numeric(x))
}
Copy and paste this code into the editor, and save the file using, for example,
logitfunc.R
as its name. After that, source the file in R from the editor using either
the 
source()
function or the source button or command from the editor of your
choice. Now the function code is loaded in R, and you’re ready to start hunting.
The logit is nothing else but the logarithm of the odds, calculated as 
log(x
/ (1-x))
if 
x
is the probability of some event taking place. Statisticians use
this when modeling binary data using generalized linear models. If you ever
need to calculate a logit yourself, you can use the function 
qlogis()
for that.
To calculate probabilities from logit values, you use the 
plogis()
function.
Knowing where an error comes from
Your colleague complained that he got an error when trying the following
code:
> logitpercent(‘50%’)
Error in 1 - x : non-numeric argument to binary operator
Sure enough, but you don’t find the code 
1 - x
in the body of 
logit
percent()
. So, the error comes from somewhere else. To know from where, you
can use the 
traceback()
function immediately after the error occurred, like this:
> traceback()
2: logit(as.numeric(x)) at logitfunc.R#9
1: logitpercent(“50%”)
This 
traceback()
function prints what is called the call stack that lead to
the last error. This call stack represents the sequence of function calls, but in
reverse order. The function at the top is the function in which the actual error
is generated.
In this example, R called the 
logitpercent()
function, and that function, in
turn, called 
logit()
. The traceback tells you that the error occurred inside the
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
pdf select text; search multiple pdf files for text
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
how to select text in pdf image; pdf find text
logit()
function. Even more, the 
traceback()
function tells you that the error
occurred in line 9 of the 
logitfunc.R
code file, as indicated by 
logitfunc.R#9
in the
traceback()
output.
The call stack gives you a whole lot of information — sometimes too much.
It may point to some obscure internal function as the one that threw the error.
If that function doesn’t ring a bell, check higher in the call stack for a function
you recognize and start debugging from there.
Looking inside a function
Now that you know where the error came from, you can try to find out how the
error came about. If you look at the code, you expect that the 
as.numeric()
function in 
logitpercent()
sends a numeric value to the 
logit()
function. So, you
want to check what’s going on in there.
In ancient times, programmers debugged a function simply by letting it print
out the value of variables they were interested in. You can do the same by
inserting a few 
print()
statements in the 
logit()
function. This way, you can’t
examine the object though, and you have to add and delete print statements at
every point where you want to peek inside the function. Luckily, we’ve passed the
age of the dinosaurs; R gives you better methods to check what’s going on.
Telling R which function to debug
You can step through a function after you tell R you want to debug it using the
debug()
function, like this:
> debug(logit)
From now on, R will switch to the browser mode every time that function is
called from anywhere in R, until you tell R explicitly to stop debugging or until you
overwrite the function by sourcing it again. To stop debugging a function, you
simply use 
undebug(logit)
.
If you want to step through a function only once, you can use the function
debugonce()
instead of 
debug()
. R will go to browser mode the next time the
function is called, and only that time — so you don’t need to use 
undebug()
to
stop debugging.
If you try the function 
logitpercent()
again after running the code
debug(logit)
, you see the following:
> logitpercent(‘50%’)
debugging in: logit(as.numeric(x))
debug at D:/RForDummies/Ch10/logitfunc.R#2: {
x <- ifelse(x < 0 | x > 1, “NA”, x)
log(x/(1 - x))
}
Browse[2]>
You see that the prompt changed. It now says 
Browse[2]
. This prompt tells
you that you’re browsing inside a function.
The number indicates at which level of the call stack you’re browsing at that
moment. Remember from the output of the 
traceback()
function that the
logit()
function occurred as the second function on the call stack. That’s the
number 
2
in the output above.
The additional text above the changed prompt gives you the following
information:
The line from where you called the function — in this case, the line
logit(as.numeric(x))
from the 
logitpercent()
function
The file or function that you debug — in this case, the file 
logitfunc.R
, starting
at the second line
Part of the code you’re about to browse through
Stepping through the function
When you’re in browser mode, you can use any R code you want in order to
check the state of different objects. You can browse through the function now with
the following commands:
To run the next line of code, type n and press Enter. R enters the step-through
mode. To run the subsequent lines of code line by line, you don’t have to type n
anymore (although you still can). Just pressing Enter suffices.
To run the remaining part of the code, type c and press Enter.
To exit browser mode, type Q and press Enter.
If you want to look at an object that’s named like any of the special browse
commands, you have to specifically print it out, using either 
print(n)
or
str(n)
.
You can try it out yourself now. Just type n in the console, press Enter, and
you see the following:
Browse[2]> n
debug at D:/RForDummies/Ch10 /logitfunc.R#3: x <- ifelse(x < 0 | x > 1,
“NA”, x)
R now tells you what line it will run next. Because this is the first line in your
code, 
x
still has the value that was passed by the 
logitpercent()
function.
It’s always smart to check whether that value is what you expect it to be.
The 
logitpercent()
function should pass the value 
0.50
to 
logit()
, because
this is the translation of 50 percent into a proportion. However, if you look at
the value of 
x
, you see the following:
Browse[2]> str(x)
num 50
Okay, it is a number, but it’s 100 times larger than it should be. So, in the
logitpercent()
function, your colleague made a logical error and forgot to divide
by 100. If you correct that in the editor window and then save and source the file
again, the test command gives the correct answer:
> logitpercent(‘50%’)
[1] 0
Start browsing from within the function
This still doesn’t explain the error. Your colleague intended to return 
NA
if the
number wasn’t between 0 and 1, but the function doesn’t do that. It’s the 
ifelse()
line in the code where the number is checked, so you know where the problem lies.
You can easily browse through the 
logit()
function until you reach that point,
but when your function is larger, that task can become tedious. R allows you to
start the browser at a specific point in your code if you insert a 
browser()
statement at that point. For example, to start the browser mode right after the
ifelse()
line, you change the body of the 
logit()
function, as in the following
code, and source it again:
logit <- function(x){
x <- ifelse(x < 0 | x > 1, “NA”, x)
browser()
log(x / (1 - x) )
}
By sourcing the same function again, you implicitly stop debugging the
function. That’s why you don’t have to un-debug the function explicitly using
undebug(logit)
.
If you now try to run this function again, you see the following:
> logit(50)
Called from: logit(50)
Browse[1]>
You get less information than you do when you use 
debug()
, but you can use
the browser mode in exactly the same way as with 
debug()
.
You can put a 
browser()
statement inside a loop as well. If you use the
command c to run the rest of the code, in this case, R will carry out the
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested