how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Search text in pdf image control Library platform web page asp.net wpf web browser R%20dummies24-part985

function only until the next round in the loop. This way, you can step through
the loops of a function.
As you entered the function after the 
ifelse()
line, R carried out that code
already, so the value of 
x
should be changed to 
NA
. But if you check the value of 
x
now, you see this:
Browse[2]> str(x)
chr “NA”
Running the next line finally gives the error. Indeed, your colleague made a
semantic error here: He wanted to return 
NA
if the value of 
x
wasn’t between 0 and
1, but he accidentally quoted the 
NA
and that makes it a character vector. The code
doesn’t have any syntax error, but it’s still not correct.
If you use 
browser()
in your code, don’t forget to delete it afterward.
Otherwise, your function will continue to switch to browse mode every time
you use it. And don’t think you won’t forget — even experienced R
programmers forget this all the time!
Generating Your Own Messages
Generating your own messages may sound strange in a chapter about
debugging, but you can prevent bugs by actually generating your own errors.
Remember the logic error in the 
logitpercent()
function? It would’ve been easier
to spot if the 
logit()
function returned an error saying that you passed a number
greater than 1.
Adding sensible error (or warning) messages to a function can help
debugging future functions where you call that specific function again. It
especially helps in finding semantic or logic errors that are otherwise hard to
find.
Creating errors
You can tell R to throw an error by inserting the 
stop()
function anywhere in
Search text in pdf image - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf for text; pdf editor with search and replace text
Search text in pdf image - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
search text in pdf image; select text in pdf file
the body of the function, as in the following example:
logit <- function(x){
if( any(x < 0 | x > 1) ) stop(‘x not between 0 and 1’)
log(x / (1 - x) )
}
With the 
if()
statement, you test whether any value in 
x
lies between 0 and
1. Using the 
any()
function around the condition allows your code to work with
complete vectors at once, instead of with single values. Because the 
log()
function
works vectorized as well, the whole function is now vectorized (see Chapter 4).
If you change the body of the 
logit()
function this way and try to calculate
the logit of 50% and 150% (or 0.5 and 1.5), R throws an error like the following:
> logitpercent(c(‘50%’,’150%’))
Error in logit(as.numeric(x)/100) : x not between 0 and 1
As the name implies, the execution of the code stops anytime the 
stop()
function is actually carried out; hence, it doesn’t return a result.
Creating warnings
Your colleague didn’t intend for the 
logit()
function to stop, though, when
some input values were wrong — he just wanted the function to return 
NA
for those
values. So, you also could make the function generate a warning instead of an
error. That way you still get the same information, but the complete function is
carried out so you get a result as well.
To generate a warning, use the 
warning()
function instead of the 
stop()
function. So, to get the result your colleague wants, you simply change the body of
the function to the following code:
x <- ifelse(x < 0 | x > 1, NA, x )
if( any(is.na(x)) ) warning(‘x not between 0 and 1’)
log(x / (1 - x) )
If you try the function now, you get the desired result:
> logitpercent(c(‘50%’,’150%’))
[1]  0 NA
Warning message:
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
pdf searchable text; searching pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET code to add an image to the inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
pdf text search; search pdf files for text
In logit(as.numeric(x)/100) : x not between 0 and 1
Not only does the function return 
NA
when it should, but it also gives you a
warning that can help with debugging other functions that use the 
logit()
function
somewhere in the body.
Recognizing the Mistakes You’re Sure to Make
Despite all the debugging tools you have at your disposal, you need some
experience to quickly find pesky bugs. But some mistakes are fairly common, and
checking whether you made any of these gives you a big chance of pinpointing the
error easily. Some of these mistakes come from default behavior of R you didn’t
take into account; others are just the result of wool gathering. But every R
programmer has made these mistakes at one point, and so will you.
Starting with the wrong data
Probably the most common mistakes in R are made while reading in data from
text files using 
read.table()
or 
read.csv()
, as you do in Chapter 12. Many
mistakes result in R throwing errors, but sometimes you only notice something
went wrong when you look at the structure of your data. In the latter case you
often find that some or all variables are converted to factors when they really
shouldn’t be (for example, because they should contain only numerical data).
When R gives errors or the structure of your data isn’t what you think it should
be, check the following:
Did you forget to specify the argument 
header=TRUE
? If so, R will see the
column names as values and, as a result, convert every variable to a factor as it
always does with character data in a text file.
Did you have spaces in your column names or data? The 
read.table()
function can interpret spaces in, for example, column names or in string data as
a separator. You then get errors telling you 
‘line x did not have y elements’
.
Did you have a different decimal separator? In some countries, decimals
are separated by a comma. You have to specifically tell R that’s the case by
using the argument 
dec=”,”
in the 
read.table()
function.
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
select text pdf file; make pdf text searchable
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
If you want to turn PDF file into image file format in C# application, then RasterEdge XDoc.PDF for .NET can also help with this.
pdf find highlighted text; cannot select text in pdf
Did you forget to specify 
stringsAsFactors = FALSE
? By default, R changes
character data to factors, so you always have to add this argument if you want
your data to remain character variables.
Did you have another way of specifying missing values? R reads 
‘NA’
in a
text file as a missing value, but the file may use a different code (for example,
‘missing’
). R will see that as text and again convert that variable to a factor.
You solve this by specifying the argument 
na.strings
in the 
read.table()
function.
If you always check the structure of your data immediately after you read it
in, you can catch errors much earlier and avoid hours of frustration. Your best
bet is to use 
str()
for information on the types and 
head()
to see if the values
are what you expected.
Having your data in the wrong format
As we’ve stressed multiple times, every function in R expects your data to be
in a specific format. That doesn’t mean simply whether it’s an integer, character, or
factor, but also whether you supply a vector, a matrix, a data frame, or a list. Many
functions can deal with multiple formats, but sometimes the result isn’t what you
expect at all.
In fact, functions are generic functions that dispatch to a method for the
object you supplied as an argument. (See Chapter 8 for more information on
dispatching.)
Dropping dimensions when you don’t expect it
This mistake is definitely another classic. R automatically tries to reduce the
number of dimensions when subsetting a matrix, array, or data frame (see Chapter
7). If you want to calculate the row sums of the numeric variables in a data frame
— for example, the built-in data frame 
sleep
— you can write a little function like
this:
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Free PDF image processing SDK library for Visual Studio .NET program. Powerful .NET PDF image edit control, enable users to insert vector images to PDF file.
search text in multiple pdf; convert a scanned pdf to searchable text
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Text to PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. Providing C# Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page with .NET PDF Library.
search pdf files for text programmatically; convert pdf to searchable text
rowsum.df <- function(x){
id <- sapply(x,is.numeric)
rowSums(x[, id])
}
If you try that out on two built-in data frames, 
pressure
and 
sleep
, you get a
result for the first one but the following error message for the second:
> rowsum.df(sleep)
Error in rowSums(x[, id]) :
‘x’ must be an array of at least two dimensions
Because 
sleep
contains only a single numeric variable, 
x[, id]
returns a
vector instead of a data frame, and that causes the error in 
rowSums()
.
You can solve this problem either by adding 
drop=FALSE
(as shown in
Chapter 7) or by using the list subsetting method 
x[i]
instead.
Messing up with lists
Although lists help with keeping data together and come in very handy when
you’re processing multiple datasets, they can cause some trouble as well.
First, you can easily forget that some function returns a list instead of a vector.
For example, many programmers forget that 
strsplit()
returns a list instead of a
vector. So, if you want the second word from a sentence, the following code
doesn’t return an error, but it doesn’t give you the right answer either:
> strsplit(‘this is a sentence’,’ ‘)[2]
[[1]]
NULL
In this example, 
strsplit()
returns a list with one element, the vector with
the words from the sentence:
> strsplit(‘this is a sentence’,’ ‘)
[[1]]
[1] “this”     “is”       “a”        “sentence”
To access this vector, you first have to select the wanted element from the
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
be converted to plain text. Text can be extracted from scanned PDF image with OCR component. Professional PDF to text converting library
how to select text in pdf and copy; search a pdf file for text
C# PDF replace text Library: replace text in PDF content in C#.net
The following demo code will show how to replace text in specified PDF page. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); // Set the search options.
how to search a pdf document for text; converting pdf to searchable text format
list. Only then can you look for the second value using the vector indices, like this:
> strsplit(‘this is a sentence’,’ ‘)[[1]][2]
[1] “is”
Even the indexing mechanism itself can cause errors of this kind. For example,
you have some names of customers and you want to add a dot between their first
and last names. So, first, you split them like this:
> customer <- c(‘Johan Delong’,’Marie Petit’)
> namesplit <- strsplit(customer,’ ‘)
You want to paste the second name together with a dot in between, so you
need to select the second element from the list. If you use single brackets, you get
the following:
> paste(namesplit[2],collapse=’.’)
[1] “c(\”Marie\”, \”Petit\”)”
That isn’t what you want at all. Remember from Chapter 7 that you can use
both single brackets and double brackets to select elements from a list, but when
you use single brackets, you always get a list returned. So, to get the correct
result, you need double brackets, like this:
> paste(namesplit[[2]],collapse=’.’)
[1] “Marie.Petit”
Notice that R never gave a sign — not even a warning — that something
was wrong. So, if you notice lists where you wouldn’t expect them (or don’t
notice them where you do expect them), check your brackets.
Mixing up factors and numeric vectors
If you work with factors that have numeric values as levels, you have to be
extra careful when using these factors in models and other calculations. For
example, you convert the number of cylinders in the dataset 
mtcars
to a factor like
this:
> cyl.factor <- as.factor(mtcars$cyl)
If you want to know the median number of cylinders, you may be tempted to
do the following:
> median(as.numeric(cyl.factor))
[1] 2
This result is bogus, because the minimum number of cylinders is four. R
converts the internal representation of the factor to numbers, not the labels. So,
you get numbers starting from one to the number of levels instead of the original
values.
To correctly transform a factor its original numeric values, you can first
transform the factor to character and then to numeric, as shown in Chapter 5.
But on very big data, this is done faster with the following construct:
> as.numeric(levels(cyl.factor))[cyl.factor]
With this code, you create a short vector with the levels as numeric values,
and then use the internal integer representation of the factor to select the correct
value.
Although R often converts a numeric vector to a factor automatically when
necessary, it doesn’t do so if both numeric vectors and factors can be used. If
you want to model, for example, the mileage of a car to the number of
cylinders, you get a different model when you use the number of cylinders as a
numeric vector or as a factor. The interpretation of both models is completely
different, and a lot depends on what exactly you want to do. But you have to
be aware of that, or you may be interpreting the wrong model.
Chapter 11
Getting Help
In This Chapter
Using the built-in R help
Finding information online
Joining the R community
Making a reproducible example to get help
Even the best R programmers occasionally get stuck on a problem. In these
situations, you need to know how to find help. Fortunately, R code is generally very
well documented and has excellent help available. You just need to know how to
access it. In this chapter, we show you how.
If the built-in help doesn’t solve your problem, you can search for information
on the Internet and turn to the online R community. We end this chapter by
walking you through how to create a minimal reproducible example, which you’ll
find helpful in getting help.
Finding Information in the R Help Files
The R documentation (in the form of R Help files) is a phenomenally rich
resource. Most of the time, if you read the Help files carefully, you’ll get a better
understanding of why a function isn’t doing what you think it should or why you’re
getting an error. Although some of the R Help files can look cryptic at first glance, if
you persevere — and know what to look for — your investment will pay off.
When you know exactly what you’re looking for
If you know the name of the function you need help with, you can access
the R Help files in two ways:
By typing help(...) with the function name inside the brackets. For example,
typing help(paste) returns help about the 
paste()
function.
By typing ? followed by the name of the function. For example, typing ?paste
returns help about the 
paste()
function.
Typically, the R Help files follow a fairly standard outline. You find most of the
following sections in every R Help file:
Title: A one-sentence overview of the function.
Description: An introduction to the high-level objectives of the function,
typically about one paragraph long.
Usage: A description of the syntax of the function (in other words, how the
function is called). This is where you find all the arguments that you can supply
to the function, as well as any default values of these arguments.
Arguments: A description of each argument. Usually this includes a specification
of the class (for example, 
character
numeric
list
, and so on). This section is
an important one to understand, because supplying an argument of the wrong
class is quite frequently a cause of errors in R.
Details: Extended details about how the function works, provides longer
descriptions of the various ways to call the function (if applicable), and a longer
discussion of the arguments.
Value: A description of the class of the value returned by the function.
See also: Links to other relevant functions. In most of the R editors, you can
click these links to read the Help files for these functions.
Examples: Worked examples of real R code that you can paste into your console
and run.
One of the most powerful ways of using R Help is to carefully study the
examples in the Examples section. The documentation authors designed these
examples to be reproducible, which means that you can copy the whole example to
your R console and run it directly. Often, this can help you really understand the
nature of the input that each function needs and the output the function gives.
When you don’t know exactly what you’re looking for
Sometimes you don’t know the exact function to use. Or maybe you know the
name of the function but you can’t remember whether it’s spelled in all lowercase
letters or with some uppercase letters. In these situations, you have to search the
R Help files to find what you need.
You can search the R Help files by typing help.search(...) with a quoted
search term inside the brackets. This gives a list of functions that are similar to the
search term; it’s useful if you can’t remember the exact name of a function,
because 
help.search()
makes use of fuzzy matching to return a list of matching
Help topics. For example, typing help.search(“date”) in the console returns a
long list of possible matches, including 
format.Date
as.POSIXlt
, and
DateTimeClasses
, among others.
Typing two question marks followed by the search term is a shortcut for
help.search()
. For example, typing ??date returns the same list of functions
as typing help.search(“date”) does.
When you search for R help, you get a list of topics that match the search
term. For example, you may get the following result when typing ??date:
ada::update.ada            Add more trees to an ada object
chron::chron               Create a Chronological Object
chron::cut.dates           Create a Factor from a Chron or Dates Object
chron::dates               Generate Dates and Times Components from Input
....
base::Date                 Date Class
base::DateTimeClasses      Date-Time Classes
base::diff                 Lagged Differences
...
The left-hand column contains the functions that match your search term,
and the right-hand column contains the R Help file title for this function. Notice
that each function consists of two elements separated by two colons (for
example, 
ada::update.ada
). This means, for example, that in the package 
ada
,
there is a function called 
update.ada()
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested