how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Search pdf files for text programmatically control software system web page winforms .net console R%20dummies25-part986

From the description of 
ada::update
, it’s immediately apparent that this
function has nothing to do with dates or times. Nonetheless, it was included in the
search results because the function name contained the substring 
date
. In this
case, if you scroll down the list, you’ll also find references to several date functions
in the 
base
package, including 
Date()
DateTimeClasses()
, and 
diff()
.
After you’ve identified a function that looks helpful, type ?functionName to
open the relevant Help page. For example, typing ?Date opens the Help page for
Date
.
When you use 
help()
or 
?
, you also can specify a topic name, not just a
function name. Some really useful Help pages describe the effect of many
functions at once, and because they have a unique topic name, you can access
these directly. For example, try reading the Help for 
?Syntax
?Quotes
, or 
?
DateTimeClasses
.
Searching the Web for Help with R
Sometimes the built-in R Help simply doesn’t give you that moment of
inspiration to solve your problem. When this happens, it’s time to tap into the
information available on the web.
You can search the Internet directly from your R console, by using the
RSiteSearch()
function. This function enables you to search for keywords in
the R documentation, as well as the R Help mailing list archives (for more on
the R mailing lists, see “Using the R mailing lists,” later in this chapter).
RSiteSearch()
takes your search term and passes it to the search engine at
http://search.r-project.org
. Then you can view the search results in your
web browser.
For example, to use 
RSiteSearch()
to search for the term cluster analysis, use
the following:
> RSiteSearch(“cluster analysis”)
Search pdf files for text programmatically - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf for text in multiple files; text searchable pdf file
Search pdf files for text programmatically - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
how to search text in pdf document; pdf text searchable
Another way of searching the web directly from your console is to use the
add-on package called 
sos
and the search function 
findFn()
. This function is a
wrapper around 
RSiteSearch()
that combines all the 
RSiteSearch()
results
into tabular form on a single page, which may make the results easier to
digest.
To use 
findFn
, you first have to install the 
sos
package:
> install.packages(“sos”)
Then you load the package using 
library(sos)
. Finally, you use
findFn(“cluster”)
:
> library(sos)
> findFn(“cluster”)
found 2311 matches;  retrieving 20 pages, 400 matches.
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
This opens a new tab in your favorite web browser with the results in an easy-
to-read table. Each row of the table contains a function, the name of the package,
and a helpful description and link to the Help page for that function.
If you’re trying to search for R topics in your favorite search engine, you
may find that the results tend to be unrelated to the programming language.
One way of improving the accuracy of your search results is to enclose the R in
square brackets. For example, to search for the topic of regression in R, use
[R] regression as your search term. This technique seems to work because the
R mailing lists tend to have [R] in the topic for each message. In addition, on
the Stack Overflow website (
www.stackoverflow.com
), questions that are
related to R are tagged with [r].
In addition to your favorite search engine, you also can use the dedicated R
search site at 
http://search.r-project.org
to search through R functions,
vignettes, and the R Help mailing lists. Or you can use the search engine
www.rseek.org
, which is dedicated to R and will search first through all R-related
websites for an answer.
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
TIFF files compression and decompression method and Image files compression and images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size Embedded search index.
find and replace text in pdf; how to make pdf text searchable
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Create PDF Document from Existing Files Using C#.
pdf searchable text converter; how to select text on pdf
Getting Involved in the R Community
Sometimes, no matter how hard you search for help in the mailing list
archives, blogs, or other relevant material, you’re still stuck. If this ever happens to
you, you may want to tap into the R community. R has a very active community
made up of people who not only write and share code, but also are very willing to
help other R users with their problems.
Using the R mailing lists
The R Development Core Team actively supports four different mailing lists. At
www.r-project.org/mail.html
, you can find up-to-date information about these
lists, as well as find links to subscribe or unsubscribe from the lists. When you
subscribe to a mailing list, you can choose to receive either individual e-mail
messages or a daily digest.
The four important mailing lists are
R-help: This is the main R Help mailing list. Anyone can register and post
messages on this list, and people discuss a wide variety of topics (for example,
how to install packages, how to interpret R’s output of statistical results, or what
to do in response to warnings and error messages).
R-announce: This list is for announcements about significant developments in
the R code base.
R-packages: This list is where package authors can announce news about their
packages.
R-devel: This is a specialist mailing list aimed at developers of functions or new
R packages — in other words, serious R developers! It’s more about
programming than about general topics.
Before posting a message to any of the R mailing lists, make sure that you
read the posting guidelines, available at 
www.r-project.org/posting-
guide.html
. In particular, make sure you include a good, small, reproducible
example (see “Making a Minimal Reproducible Example,” later in this chapter).
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Merge, split PDF files. Insert, delete PDF pages. Read PDF metadata. Search text content inside PDF. Edit, remove images from PDF. Add, edit, delete links.
how to select text in pdf reader; how to select text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert CSV to PDF
C#.NET rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF to batch convert multiple RTF files to adobe PDF files. are able to convert RTF to PDF programmatically with VB
convert pdf to word searchable text; select text in pdf
In addition to these general mailing lists, you also can participate in about 20
special interest group mailing lists. See the sidebar “Special interest group mailing
lists” for more information.
Special interest group mailing lists
The R mailing list website 
www.r-project.org/mail.html
also contains links
to more than 20 mailing lists for special interest groups. We list them here by
topic:
Operating systems:
R-SIG-Mac: Mac ports of R
R-SIG-Debian: Debian ports of R
R-SIG-Fedora: Fedora and Redhat ports of R
Advanced modeling:
R-sig-dynamic-models: Dynamic simulation models in R
R-sig-Epi: Epidemiological data analysis
R-sig-ecology: Ecological data analysis
R-sig-gR: Graphical models
R-sig-networks: Network- or graph-related software within R
R-sig-phylo: Phylogenetic and comparative methods and analyses
R-sig-Robust: Robust statistics
R-sig-mixed-models: Mixed effect models, notably 
lmer()
-related
Fields of application for R:
R-SIG-Finance: Finance
R-sig-Geo: Geographical data and mapping
Specialist development:
R-sig-DB: Database Interfaces
R-SIG-GUI: GUI development
R-SIG-HPC: High-performance computing
Other:
R-sig-Jobs: Announcements of jobs where R is used
R-sig-mediawiki: The R extension for MediaWiki
R-sig-QA: Quality assurance and validation
R-sig-teaching: Teaching statistics (and more) using R
R-sig-Wiki: The development of an “R wiki”
Discussing R on Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange
Stack Exchange (
www.stackexchange.com
) is a popular website where people
C# PowerPoint - PowerPoint Creating in C#.NET
to Create New PowerPoint File and Load PowerPoint from Other Files. searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics programmatically.
select text in pdf reader; text searchable pdf
C# Word - Word Creating in C#.NET
Users How to Create New Word File and Load Word from Other Files. is searchable and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics programmatically.
find text in pdf image; can't select text in pdf file
can ask and answer questions on a variety of topics. It’s really a network of sites.
Two of the Stack Exchange sites have substantial communities of people asking
and answering questions about R:
Stack Overflow (
www.stackoverflow.com
): Here, people discuss programming
questions in a variety of programming languages, such as C++, Java, and R.
CrossValidated (
http://stats.stackexchange.com
): Here, people discuss
topics related to statistics and data visualization. Because R really excels at
these tasks, there is a growing community of R coders on CrossValidated.
Both of these sites use tags to identify topics that are discussed. Both sites
use the 
[r]
tag to identify questions about R. To find these questions,
navigate to the Tags section on the page and type r in the search box.
Tweeting about R
If you want to join the discussion about R on Twitter (
www.twitter.com
), follow
and use the hashtag #rstats. This hashtag attracts discussion from a wide variety
of people, including bloggers, package authors, professional R developers, and
other interested parties.
Making a Minimal Reproducible Example
When you ask the R community for help, you’ll get the most useful advice if
you know how to make a minimal reproducible example. A reproducible example is
a sample of code and data that any other user can run and get the same results as
you do. A minimal reproducible example is the smallest possible example that
illustrates the problem; it consists of the following:
A small set of sample data
A short snippet of code that reproduces the error
The necessary information on your R version, the system it’s being run on, and
the packages you’re using
C# Word - Word Create or Build in C#.NET
C#.NET using this Word document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Create Word Document from Existing Files Using C#. Create Word From PDF.
find and replace text in pdf file; cannot select text in pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create writable PDF file from text (.txt) file in VB.NET project. Load PDF from stream programmatically in VB.NET.
how to select all text in pdf file; text select tool pdf
If you want to know what a minimal reproducible example looks like, take a
look at the examples in the R Help files. In general, all the code given in the R
Help files fulfills the requirements of a minimal reproducible example.
Creating sample data with random values
In most cases, you can use random data to illustrate a problem. R has some
useful built-in functions to generate random numbers and other random data.
For example, to make a vector of random numbers, use 
rnorm()
for the normal
distribution or 
runif()
for a uniform distribution. To make a random vector
with five elements, try the following:
> set.seed(1)
> x <- rnorm(5)
> x
[1] -0.6264538  0.1836433 -0.8356286  1.5952808  0.3295078
You can use the 
set.seed()
function to specify a starting seed value for
generating random numbers. By setting a seed value, you guarantee that the
random numbers are the same each time you run the code. This sounds a bit
pointless, doesn’t it? It may be pointless in production code, but it’s essential
for a reproducible example. By setting a seed, you guarantee that your code
will produce the same results as another person running your code.
If you want to generate random values of a predetermined set, use the
sample()
function. This function is a bit like dealing from a deck of playing
cards. In a card game, you have 52 cards and you know exactly which cards
are in the deck. But each deal will be different. You can simulate dealing a
hand of seven cards using the following code:
> cards <- c(1:9, “J”, “Q”, “K”, “A”)
> suits <- c(“Spades”, “Diamonds”, “Hearts”, “Clubs”)
> deck <- paste(rep(suits, each=13), cards)
> set.seed(123)
> sample(deck, 7)
[1] “Diamonds 2” “Clubs 2”    “Diamonds 8” “Clubs 5”
[5] “Clubs 7”    “Spades 3”   “Diamonds K”
By default, 
sample()
uses each value only once. But sometimes you want
elements of this section to appear multiple times. In this case, you can use the
argument 
replace=TRUE
. If you want to create a sample of size 12 consisting of the
first three letters of the alphabet, you use the following:
> set.seed(5)
> sample(LETTERS[1:3], 12, replace=TRUE)
[1] “A” “C” “C” “A” “A” “C” “B” “C” “C” “A” “A” “B”
Creating a 
data.frame
with sample data is straightforward:
> set.seed(42)
> dat <- data.frame(
+     x = sample(1:5),
+     y = sample(c(“yes”, “no”), 5, replace = TRUE)
+ )
> dat
x   y
1 5  no
2 4  no
3 1 yes
4 2  no
5 3  no
How to use a copy of your own data
Sometimes you have to use a small set of your real-world data in an
example. On these occasions, you can first create a subset of your data and
then use the function 
dput
to get an ASCII representation of your data. Then
you can paste this representation in your question to the community. As an
example, take the built in dataset 
cars
and create an ASCII representation of
the first four rows:
> dput(cars[1:4, ]) > structure(list(speed = c(4, 4,
7, 7), + dist = c(2, 10, 4, 22)), + .Names = c(“speed”,
“dist”), + row.names = c(NA, 4L), + class = “data.frame”)
Producing minimal code
The hardest part of producing a minimal reproducible example is to keep it
minimal. The challenge is to identify the smallest example (the fewest lines of
code) that reproduces the problem or error.
Before you submit your code, make sure to describe clearly which packages
you use. In other words, remember to include the 
library()
statements. Also,
test your code in a new, empty R session to make sure it runs without error.
People should be able to just copy and paste your data and your code in the
console and get exactly the same results as you get.
Providing the necessary information
Including a little bit of information about your R environment helps people
answer your questions. You should consider supplying the following:
Your R version (for example, R 2.13-1)
Your operating system (for example, Windows 7 64-bit)
The function 
sessionInfo()
prints information about your version of R and
some locale information, as well as attached or loaded packages. Sometimes
the output of this function can help you determine whether there are conflicts
between your loaded packages. Here’s an example of the results of
sessionInfo()
:
> sessionInfo()
R version 2.14.1 (2011-12-22)
Platform: x86_64-pc-mingw32/x64 (64-bit)
locale:
[1] LC_COLLATE=English_United Kingdom.1252
[2] LC_CTYPE=English_United Kingdom.1252
[3] LC_MONETARY=English_United Kingdom.1252
[4] LC_NUMERIC=C
[5] LC_TIME=English_United Kingdom.1252
attached base packages:
[1] stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets
[6] methods   base
other attached packages:
[1] rj_1.0.2-5     devtools_0.5.1
loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
[1] RCurl_1.6-10.1 tools_2.14.1
The results tell you that this session is running R version 2.14 on 64-bit
Windows, with a United Kingdom locale. You also can see that R has loaded two
packages: package 
rj
(version 1.0.2-5) and package 
devtools
(version 0.5.1).
Sometimes it’s helpful to include the results of 
sessionInfo()
in your question,
because other R users can then tell whether there could be an issue with your R
installation.
Part IV
Making the Data Talk
In this part . . .
R has earned its status as one of the leading statistical packages for a reason.
Statisticians use it to extract meaningful relationships from sometimes gigabytes of
available data in a variety of ways. For them, R is often the right tool to convert a
bunch of numbers into an interesting story.
In this part, you meet a small selection of tools that allow you to tell the story
of your data. You get to subset, combine, and restructure your data; summarize it
in meaningful ways; and use the power of statistics to test your hypotheses on the
data at hand.
Because thousands of people continue to develop new statistical techniques
and write new R packages, this section covers only a tiny spectrum of possible
analyses. But you do get insight into how you formulate tests and what you can do
with the resulting objects.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested