how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to make a pdf file text searchable SDK application service wpf html windows dnn R%20dummies26-part987

Chapter 12
Getting Data into and out of R
In This Chapter
Exploring the various ways of getting data into R
Looking at how to save your results
Understanding how files are organized in R
Every data-processing or analysis problem involves at least three broad steps:
input, process, and output. In this chapter, we cover the input and output steps.
In this chapter, we look at some of the options you have for importing your
data into R, including using the Clipboard, reading data from comma-separated
value (CSV) files, and interfacing with spreadsheets like Excel. We also give you
some pointers on importing data from commercial software such as SPSS. Next, we
give you some options for exporting your data from R. Finally, you get to
manipulate files and folders on your computer.
Getting Data into R
You have several options for importing your data into R, and we cover those
options in this section.
Because spreadsheets are so widely used, the bulk of this chapter looks at the
different options for importing data originating in spreadsheets. To illustrate the
techniques in this chapter, we use a small spreadsheet table with information
about the first ten elements of the periodic table, as shown in Figure 12-1.
Entering data in the R text editor
Although R is primarily a programming language, R has a very basic data
editor that allows you to enter data directly using the 
edit()
function.
Figure 12-1: A spreadsheet with elements of the periodic table serves as our example
How to make a pdf file text searchable - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to make a pdf document text searchable; pdf text search tool
How to make a pdf file text searchable - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
pdf text searchable; how to select text on pdf
throughout this chapter.
The 
edit()
function is only available in some R code editors, so depending
on which software you’re using to edit your R code, this approach may not
work. As of this writing, this option is not yet supported by RStudio.
To use the R text editor, first you need to initiate a variable. For example, to
create a data frame and manually enter some of the periodic table data, enter the
following:
elements <- data.frame()
elements <- edit(elements)
This displays an interactive editor where you can enter data, as shown in
Figure 12-2. Notice that because the data frame is empty, you can scroll left and
right, or up and down, to extend the editing range. Notice also that the editor
doesn’t allow you to modify column or row names.
Figure 12-2: Editing data in the R interactive text editor.
Enter some data. Then to save your work, click the X in the top-right corner.
To view the details that you’ve just entered, use the 
print()
function:
> print(elements)
var1     var2 var3
1    1 Hydrogen    H
2    2   Helium   He
3    3  Lithium   Li
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
Thus, please make sure you have installed VS 2005 or above versions and .NET Framework Now you can convert source PDF document to text file using the
search pdf for text; pdf find text
Online Convert PDF to Text file. Best free online PDF txt
We try to make it as easy as possible to convert your PDF NET solution for Visual C# developers to convert PDF document to editable & searchable text file.
how to make a pdf file text searchable; pdf search and replace text
Using the Clipboard to copy and paste
Another way of importing data interactively into R is to use the Clipboard to
copy and paste data.
If you’re used to working in spreadsheets and other interactive applications,
copying and pasting probably feels natural. If you’re a programmer or data
analyst, it’s much less intuitive. Why? Because data analysts and programmers
strive to make their results reproducible. A copy-and-paste action can’t be
reproduced easily unless you manually repeat the same action. Still,
sometimes copying and pasting is useful, so we cover it in this section.
To import data from the Clipboard, use the 
readClipboard()
function. For
example, select cells B2:B4 in the periodic table spreadsheet, press Ctrl+C to copy
those cells to the Clipboard, and then use the following R code:
> x <- readClipboard()
> x
[1] “Hydrogen” “Helium”   “Lithium”
As you can see, this approach works very well for vector data (in other words,
a single column or row of data). But things get just a little bit more complicated
when you want to import tabular data to R.
To copy and paste tabular data from a spreadsheet, first select a range in your
sheets (for example, cells B1:D5). Then use the 
readClipboard()
function and see
what happens:
> x <- readClipboard()
> x
[1] “Name\tSymbol\tGroup” “Hydrogen\tH\t1”      “Helium\tHe\t1”
[4] “Lithium\tLi\t1”      “Beryllium\tBe\t2”
This rather unintelligible result looks like complete gibberish. If you look a
little bit closer, though, you’ll notice that R has inserted lots of 
“\t”
elements into
the results. The 
“\t”
is the R way of indicating a tab character — in other words, a
tab separator between elements of data. Clearly, we need to do a bit more
processing on this to get it to work.
VB.NET Image: Robust OCR Recognition SDK for VB.NET, .NET Image
Images exported can be Png, Jpeg, Tiff, image-only PDF or Bmp. NET OCR SDK supports a wide range of image file formats, so you can make all desired changes
how to search text in pdf document; searching pdf files for text
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
API, users will be able to convert a PDF file or a page to text and easily save it as new txt file. Before you get started, please make sure that you have
make pdf text searchable; select text in pdf file
The backslash in 
“\t”
is called an escape sequence. See the sidebar “Using
special characters in escape sequences,” later in this chapter, for other
examples of frequently used escape sequences in R.
The very powerful 
read.table()
function (which you get to explore in more
detail later in this chapter) imports tabular data into R. You can customize the
behavior of 
read.table()
by changing its many arguments. Pay special attention to
the following arguments:
file
: The name of the file to import. To use the Clipboard, specify 
file =
“clipboard”
.
sep
: The separator between data elements. In the case of Microsoft Excel
spreadsheet data copied from the Clipboard, the separator is a tab, indicated by
“\t”
.
header
: This argument indicates whether the Clipboard data includes a header in
the first row (that is, column names). Whether you specify 
TRUE
or 
FALSE
depends on the range of data that you copied.
stringsAsFactors
: If 
TRUE
, this argument converts strings to factors. It’s 
FALSE
by
default.
> x <- read.table(file = “clipboard”, sep = “\t”, header=TRUE)
> x
Name Symbol Group
1  Hydrogen      H     1
2    Helium     He     1
3   Lithium     Li     1
4 Beryllium     Be     2
Although R offers some interactive facilities to work with data and the
Clipboard, it’s almost certainly less than ideal for large amounts of data. If you
want to import large data files from spreadsheets, you’ll be better off using
CSV files (described later in this chapter).
Note: Unfortunately, 
readClipboard()
is available only on Windows.
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Create multipage PDF from OpenOffice and CSV file. Creating a PDF document is a good way to share your ideas because you can make sure that the PDF file
find and replace text in pdf; cannot select text in pdf file
OCR Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
Scan a document and convert it to a searchable PDF file; provides detailed information for recognizing text from scanned in Web Document Viewer, make sure that
how to search a pdf document for text; convert pdf to word searchable text
Using special characters in escape sequences
Certain keys on your keyboard, such as the Enter and Tab keys, produce
behavior without leaving a mark in the document. To use these keys in R,
you need to use an escape sequence (a special character preceded by a
backslash).
Here are some escape sequences you may encounter or want to use:
New line: 
\n
Tab stop: 
\t
Backslash: 
\\
Hexadecimal code: 
\xnn
The new line (
\n
) character comes in handy when you create reports or print
messages from your code, while the tab stop (
\t
) is important when you try
to read some types of delimited text file.
For more information, refer to the section of the R online manual that
describes literal constants: 
http://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/R-
lang.html#Literal- constants
.
Reading data in CSV files
One of the easiest and most reliable ways of getting data into R is to use text
files, in particular CSV files. The CSV file format uses commas to separate the
different elements in a line, and each line of data is in its own line in the text file,
which makes CSV files ideal for representing tabular data. The additional benefit of
CSV files is that almost any data application supports export of data to the CSV
format. This is certainly the case for most spreadsheet applications, including
Microsoft Excel and OpenOffice Calc.
Some EU countries use an alternative standard where a comma is the
decimal separator and a semicolon is the field separator.
In the following examples, we assume that you have a CSV file stored in a
convenient folder in your file system. If you want to reproduce the exact
examples, create a small spreadsheet that looks like the example sheet in
Figure 12-1. To convert an Excel spreadsheet to CSV format, you need to
choose File⇒Save As, which gives you the option to save your file in a variety
of formats. Keep in mind that a CSV file can represent only a single worksheet
VB.NET Image: Start with RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK in Visual
this dll, users are capable of recognizing text from scanned or existing PDF documents and creating searchable PDF-OCR in in VB.NET, Open or Create a File in VB
pdf searchable text converter; pdf text search tool
of a spreadsheet. Finally, be sure to use the topmost row of your worksheet
(row 1) for the column headings.
Using read.csv() to import data
In R, you use the 
read.csv()
function to import data in CSV format. This
function has a number of arguments, but the only essential argument is 
file
,
which specifies the location and filename. To read a file called 
elements.csv
located at 
f:
use 
read.csv()
with 
file.path
:
> elements <- read.csv(file.path(“f:”, “elements.csv”))
> str(elements)
‘data.frame’: 10 obs. of  9 variables:
$ Atomic.number: int  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
$ Name         : Factor w/ 10 levels “Beryllium”,”Boron”,..: 6 5 7 1 2 3 9
10 4 8
$ Symbol       : Factor w/ 10 levels “B”,”Be”,”C”,”F”,..: 5 6 7 2 1 3 8 10
4 9
$ Group        : int  1 18 1 2 13 14 15 16 17 18
$ Period       : int  1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
$ Block        : Factor w/ 2 levels “p”,”s”: 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1
$ State.at.STP : Factor w/ 2 levels “Gas”,”Solid”: 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1
$ Occurrence   : Factor w/ 1 level “Primordial”: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
$ Description  : Factor w/ 6 levels “Alkali metal”,..: 6 5 1 2 4 6 6 6 3 5
R imports the data into a data frame. As you can see, this example has ten
observations of nine variables.
Notice that the default option is to convert character strings into factors.
Thus, the columns 
Name
Block
State.At.STP
Occurrence
, and 
Description
all
have been converted to factors. Also, notice that R converts spaces in the
column names to periods (for example, in the column 
State.At.STP
).
This default option of converting strings to factors when you use 
read.table()
can be a source of great confusion. You’re often better off importing data that
contains strings in such a way that the strings aren’t converted factors, but remain
character vectors. To import data that contains strings, use the argument
stringsAsFactors=FALSE
to 
read.csv()
or 
read.table()
:
> elements <- read.csv(file.path(“f:”, “elements.csv”),
stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
> str(elements)
‘data.frame’: 10 obs. of  9 variables:
$ Atomic.number: int  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
$ Name         : chr  “Hydrogen” “Helium” “Lithium” “Beryllium” ...
$ Symbol       : chr  “H” “He” “Li” “Be” ...
$ Group        : int  1 18 1 2 13 14 15 16 17 18
$ Period       : int  1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
$ Block        : chr  “s” “s” “s” “s” ...
$ State.at.STP : chr  “Gas” “Gas” “Solid” “Solid” ...
$ Occurrence   : chr  “Primordial” “Primordial” “Primordial” “Primordial”
...
$ Description  : chr  “Non-metal” “Noble gas” “Alkali metal” “Alkaline
earth metal” ...
If you have a file in the EU format mentioned earlier (where commas are
used as decimal separators and semicolons are used as field separators), you
need to import it to R using the 
read.csv2()
function.
Using read.table() to import tabular data in text files
The CSV format, described in the previous section, is a special case of tabular
data in text files. In general, text files can use a multitude of options to distinguish
between data elements. For example, instead of using commas, another format is
to use tab characters as the separator between columns of data. If you have a tab-
delimited file, you can use 
read.delim()
to read your data.
The functions 
read.csv()
read.csv2()
, and 
read.delim()
are special cases of
the multipurpose 
read.table()
function that can deal with a wide variety of data
file formats. The 
read.table()
function has a number of arguments that give you
fine control over the specification of the text file you want to import. Here are
some of these arguments:
header
: If the file contains column names in the first row, specify 
TRUE
.
sep
: The data separator (for example, 
sep=”,”
for CSV files or 
sep=”\t”
for tab-
separated files).
quote
: By default, strings are enclosed in double quotation marks (
). If the text
file uses single quotation marks, you can specify this as the argument to quote
(for example, 
quote=”’”
, a single quote embedded between double quotes).
nrows
: If you want to read only a certain number of rows of a file, you can specify
this by providing an integer number.
skip
: Allows you to ignore a certain number of lines before starting to read the
rest of the file.
stringsAsFactors
: If 
TRUE
, it converts strings to factors. It’s 
FALSE
by default.
You can access the built-in help by typing ?read.table into your console.
Reading data from Excel
If you ask users of R what the best way is to import data directly from
Microsoft Excel, most of them will probably answer that your best option is to first
export from Excel to a CSV file and then use 
read.csv()
to import your data to R.
In fact, this is still the advice in Chapter 8 of the R import and export manual,
which says, “The first piece of advice is to avoid doing so if possible!” See for
yourself at 
http://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/R-data.html#Reading-Excel-
spreadsheets
. The reason is that many of the existing methods for importing data
from Excel depend on third-party software or libraries that may be difficult to
configure, not available on all operating systems, or perhaps have restrictive
licensing terms.
However, since February 2011 there exists a new alternative: using the
package 
XLConnect
, available from CRAN at 
http://cran.r-
project.org/web/packages/XLConnect/index.html
. What makes 
XLConnect
different is that it uses a Java library to read and write Excel files. This has two
advantages:
It runs on all operating systems that support Java. 
XLConnect
is written in
Java and runs on Window, Linux, and Mac OS.
There’s nothing else to load. 
XLConnect
doesn’t require any other libraries or
software. If you have Java installed, it should work.
XLConnect
also can write Excel files, including changing cell formatting, in both
Excel 97–2003 and Excel 2007/10 formats.
To find out more about XLConnect, you can read the excellent package
vignette at 
http://cran.r-
project.org/web/packages/XLConnect/vignettes/XLConnect.pdf
.
By now you’re probably itching to get started with an example. Let’s assume
you want to read an Excel spreadsheet in your user directory called 
Elements.xlsx
.
First, install and load the package; then create an object with the filename:
> install.packages(“XLConnect”)
> library(“XLConnect”)
> excel.file <- file.path(“~/Elements.xlsx”)
Now you’re ready to read a sheet of this workbook with the
readWorksheetFromFile()
function. You need to pass it at least two arguments:
file: A character string with a path to a valid 
.xls
or 
.xlsx
file
sheet: Either an integer indicating the position of the worksheet (for example,
sheet=1
) or the name of the worksheet (for example, 
sheet=”Sheet2”
)
The following two lines do exactly the same thing — they both import the data
in the first worksheet (called 
Sheet1
):
> elements <- readWorksheetFromFile(excel.file, sheet=1)
> elements <- readWorksheetFromFile(excel.file, sheet=”Sheet1”)
Working with other data types
Despite the fact that CSV files are very widely used to import and export data,
they aren’t always the most appropriate format. Some data formats allow the
specification of data that isn’t tabular in nature. Other data formats allow the
description of the data using metadata (data that describes data).
The base distribution of R includes a package called 
foreign
that contains
functions to import data files from a number of commercial statistical packages,
including SPSS, Stata, SAS, Octave, and Minitab. Table 12-1 lists some of the
functions in the 
foreign
package.
To use these functions, you first have to load the 
foreign
package:
> library(foreign)
> read.spss(file=”location/of/myfile”)
Table 12-1 Functions to Import from Commercial
Statistical Software Available in the foreign Package
System
Function to Import to R
SPSS
read.spss
SAS
read.xport
or 
read.ssd
Stata
read.dta
Minitab
read.mtp
Read the Help documentation on these functions carefully. Because data
frames in R may have a quite different structure than datasets in the statistical
packages, you have to pay special attention to how value and variable labels
are treated by the functions mentioned in Table 12-1. Check also the
treatment of special missing values.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested