how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : How to search text in pdf document application SDK cloud html wpf azure class R%20dummies28-part989

$
: The dollar-sign operator selects a single element of your data (and drops the
dimensions of the returned object). When you use this operator with a data
frame, the result is always a vector; when you use it with a named list, you get
that element.
[[
: The double-square-brackets operator also returns a single element, but it
offers you the flexibility of referring to the elements by position, rather than by
name. You use it for data frames and lists.
[
: The single-square-brackets operator can return multiple elements of your
data.
This summary is simplified. Next, we look at how to use these operators to get
exactly the elements from your data that you want.
Understanding the five ways of specifying the subset
When you use the single-square-brackets operator, you return multiple
elements of your data. This means that you need a way of specifying exactly which
elements you need.
In this paragraph, you can try subsetting with the built-in dataset 
islands
, a
named numeric vector with 48 elements.
> str(islands)
Named num [1:48] 11506 5500 16988 2968 16 ...
- attr(*, “names”)= chr [1:48] “Africa” “Antarctica” “Asia” “Australia”
...
Table 13-2 illustrates the five ways of specifying which elements you want to
include in or exclude from your data.
Table 13-2 Specifying the Subset Elements
How to search text in pdf document - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
search pdf documents for text; how to select text in pdf
How to search text in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
converting pdf to searchable text format; search text in pdf image
Subset
Effect
Example
Blank
Returns all your data
islands[]
Positive
numerical values
Extracts the elements at these locations
islands[c(8, 1, 1,
42)]
Negative
numerical values
Extract all but these elements; in other words,
excludes these elements
islands[-(3:46)]
Logical values
A logical value of 
TRUE
includes element; 
FALSE
excludes element
islands[islands < 20]
Text strings
Includes elements where the names match
islands[c
(“Madagascar”,
“Cuba”)]
Subsetting data frames
Now that you’ve reviewed the rules for creating subsets, you can try it with
some data frames. You just have to remember that a data frame is a two-
dimensional object and contains rows as well as columns. This means that you
need to specify the subset for rows and columns independently. To do so, you
combine the operators.
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word
C# Word - Search and Find Text in Word. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
search a pdf file for text; how to select text in pdf image
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Insert Text to PDF Document in C#.NET. This C# coding example describes how to add a single text character to PDF document. // Open a document.
find text in pdf files; pdf text select tool
To illustrate subsetting of data frames, have a look at the built-in dataset
iris
, a data frame of five columns and 150 rows with data about iris flowers.
> str(iris)
‘data.frame’: 150 obs. of  5 variables:
$ Sepal.Length: num  5.1 4.9 4.7 4.6 5 5.4 4.6 5 4.4 4.9 ...
$ Sepal.Width : num  3.5 3 3.2 3.1 3.6 3.9 3.4 3.4 2.9 3.1 ...
$ Petal.Length: num  1.4 1.4 1.3 1.5 1.4 1.7 1.4 1.5 1.4 1.5 ...
$ Petal.Width : num  0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.1 ...
$ Species     : Factor w/ 3 levels “setosa”,”versicolor”,..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
1 1 1 ...
When you subset objects with more than one dimension, you specify the
subset argument for each dimension — you separate the subset arguments
with commas.
For example, to get the first five rows of 
iris
and all the columns, try the
following:
> iris[1:5, ]
To get all the rows but only two of the columns, try the following:
> iris[, c(“Sepal.Length”, “Sepal.Width”)]
You need to take special care when subsetting in a single column of a data
frame. Try the following:
iris[, ‘Sepal.Length’]
You’ll see that the result is a vector, not a data frame as you would expect.
When your subset operation returns a single column, the default behavior is
to return a simplified version. The way this works, is that R inspects the
lengths of the returned elements. If all these elements have the same length,
then R simplifies the result to a vector, matrix, or array. In our example, R
simplifies the result to a vector. To override this behavior, you need to specify
the argument 
drop=FALSE
in your subset operation:
> iris[, ‘Sepal.Length’, drop=FALSE]
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint - Search and Find Text in PowerPoint. Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information. Overview.
find and replace text in pdf file; search pdf files for text programmatically
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. C# HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search.
how to select text in pdf and copy; how to select text in a pdf
Alternatively, you can subset the data frame like a list, as shown in Chapter 7.
The following code returns you a data frame with only one column as well:
> iris[‘Sepal.Length’]
Finally, to get a subset of only some columns and some rows:
> iris[1:5, c(“Sepal.Length”, “Sepal.Width”)]
Sepal.Length Sepal.Width
1          5.1         3.5
2          4.9         3.0
3          4.7         3.2
4          4.6         3.1
5          5.0         3.6
Taking samples from data
Statisticians often have to take samples of data and then calculate statistics.
Because a sample is really nothing more than a subset of data, taking a sample is
easy with R. To do so, you make use of 
sample()
, which takes a vector as input;
then you tell it how many samples to draw from that list.
Say you wanted to simulate rolls of a die, and you want to get ten results.
Because the outcome of a single roll of a die is a number between one and six,
your code looks like this:
> sample(1:6, 10, replace=TRUE)
[1] 2 2 5 3 5 3 5 6 3 5
You tell 
sample()
to return ten values, each in the range 
1:6
. Because every
roll of the die is independent from every other roll of the die, you’re sampling with
replacement. This means that you take one sample from the list and reset the list
to its original state (in other words, you put the element you’ve just drawn back
into the list). To do this, you add the argument 
replace=TRUE
, as in the example.
Because the return value of the 
sample()
function is a randomly determined
number, if you try this function repeatedly, you’ll get different results every time.
This is the correct behavior in most cases, but sometimes you may want to get
repeatable results every time you run the function. Usually, this will occur only
when you develop and test your code, or if you want to be certain that someone
else can test your code and get the same values you did. In this case, it’s
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
All text content of target PDF document can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout. C#.NET class source code
convert a scanned pdf to searchable text; select text pdf file
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
The following C# coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text deleting function in your .NET project, according to search option. // Open a document.
how to make a pdf document text searchable; text select tool pdf
customary to specify a so-called seed value.
If you provide a seed value, the random-number sequence will be reset to a
known state. This is because R doesn’t create truly random numbers, but only
pseudo-random numbers. A pseudo-random sequence is a set of numbers that,
for all practical purposes, seem to be random but were generated by an
algorithm. When you set a starting seed for a pseudo-random process, R
always returns the same pseudo-random sequence. But if you don’t set the
seed, R draws from the current state of the random number generator (RNG).
On startup R may set a random seed to initialize the RNG, but each time you
call it, R starts from the next value in the RNG stream. You can read the Help
for 
?RNG
to get more detail.
In R, you use the 
set.seed()
function to specify your seed starting value. The
argument to 
set.seed()
is any integer value.
> set.seed(1)
> sample(1:6, 10, replace=TRUE)
[1] 2 3 4 6 2 6 6 4 4 1
If you draw another sample, without setting a seed, you get a different set of
results, as you would expect:
> sample(1:6, 10, replace=TRUE)
[1] 2 2 5 3 5 3 5 6 3 5
Now, to demonstrate that 
set.seed()
actually does reset the RNG, try it again.
But this time, set the seed once more:
> set.seed(1)
> sample(1:6, 10, replace=TRUE)
[1] 2 3 4 6 2 6 6 4 4 1
You get exactly the same results as the first time you used 
set.seed(1)
.
You can use 
sample()
to take samples from the data frame 
iris
. In this case,
you may want to use the argument 
replace=FALSE
. Because this is the default
value of the 
replace
argument, you don’t need to write it explicitly:
> set.seed(123)
> index <- sample(1:nrow(iris), 5)
> index
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Easy to search PDF text in whole PDF document. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: View PDF Online. 13. Page Thumbnails. Navigate PDF document with thumbnails. 14. Text Search
how to select all text in pdf; pdf editor with search and replace text
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
following coding example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing function in your VB.NET project, according to search option. 'Open a document Dim doc As
pdf searchable text; pdf find highlighted text
[1]  44 119  62 133 142
> iris[index, ]
Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width    Species
44           5.0         3.5          1.6         0.6     setosa
119          7.7         2.6          6.9         2.3  virginica
62           5.9         3.0          4.2         1.5 versicolor
133          6.4         2.8          5.6         2.2  virginica
142          6.9         3.1          5.1         2.3  virginica
Removing duplicate data
A very useful application of subsetting data is to find and remove duplicate
values.
R has a useful function, 
duplicated()
, that finds duplicate values and returns a
logical vector that tells you whether the specific value is a duplicate of a previous
value. This means that for duplicated values, 
duplicated()
returns 
FALSE
for the
first occurrence and 
TRUE
for every following occurrence of that value, as in the
following example:
> duplicated(c(1,2,1,3,1,4))
[1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
If you try this on a data frame, R automatically checks the observations
(meaning, it treats every row as a value). So, for example, with the data frame
iris
:
> duplicated(iris)
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
[10] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
....
[136] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
[145] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
If you look carefully, you notice that row 143 is a duplicate (because the 143rd
element of your result has the value 
TRUE
). You also can tell this by using the
which()
function:
> which(duplicated(iris))
[1] 143
Now, to remove the duplicate from 
iris
, you need to exclude this row from
your data. Remember that there are two ways to exclude data using subsetting:
Specify a logical vector, where 
FALSE
means that the element will be
excluded. The 
!
(exclamation point) operator is a logical negation. This means
that it converts 
TRUE
into 
FALSE
and vice versa. So, to remove the duplicates
from 
iris
, you do the following:
> iris[!duplicated(iris), ]
Specify negative values. In other words:
> index <- which(duplicated(iris))
> iris[-index, ]
In both cases, you’ll notice that your instruction has removed row 143.
Removing rows with missing data
Another useful application of subsetting data frames is to find and remove
rows with missing data. The R function to check for this is 
complete.cases()
. You
can try this on the built-in dataset 
airquality
, a data frame with a fair amount of
missing data:
> str(airquality)
> complete.cases(airquality)
The results of 
complete.cases()
is a logical vector with the value 
TRUE
for
rows that are complete, and 
FALSE
for rows that have some 
NA
values. To remove
the rows with missing data from 
airquality
, try the following:
> x <- airquality[complete.cases(airquality), ]
> str(x)
Your result should be a data frame with 111 rows, rather than the 153 rows of
the original 
airquality
data frame.
As always with R, there is more than one way of achieving your goal. In this
case, you can make use of 
na.omit()
to omit all rows that contain NA values:
> x <- na.omit(airquality)
When you’re certain that your data is clean, you can start to analyze it by
adding calculated fields.
If you use any of these methods to subset your data or clean out missing
values, remember to store the result in a new object. R doesn’t change
anything in the original data frame unless you explicitly overwrite it. That’s a
good thing, because you can’t accidently mess up your data.
Adding Calculated Fields to Data
After you’ve created the appropriate subset of your data, the next step in your
analysis is likely to be to perform some calculations.
Doing arithmetic on columns of a data frame
R makes it very easy to perform calculations on columns of a data frame
because each column is itself a vector. This means that you can use all the tools
that you encountered in Chapters 4, 5, and 6.
Sticking to the 
iris
data frame, try to do a few calculations on the columns.
For example, calculate the ratio between the lengths and width of the sepals:
> x <- iris$Sepal.Length / iris$Sepal.Width
Now you can use all the R tools to examine your result. For example, inspect
the first five elements of your results with the 
head()
function:
> head(x)
[1] 1.457143 1.633333 1.468750 1.483871 1.388889 1.384615
As you can see, performing calculations on columns of a data frame is
straightforward. Just keep in mind that each column is really a vector, so you
simply have to remember how to perform operations on vectors (see Chapter 5).
Using with and within to improve code readability
After a short while of writing subset statements in R, you’ll get tired of
typing the dollar sign to extract columns of a data frame. Fortunately, there is
a way to reduce the amount of typing and to make your code much more
readable at the same time. The trick is to use the 
with()
function. Try this:
> y <- with(iris, Sepal.Length / Sepal.Width)
The 
with()
function allows you to refer to columns inside a data frame without
explicitly using the dollar sign or even the name of the data frame itself. So, in our
example, because you use 
with(iris, ...)
R knows to evaluate both
Sepal.Length
and 
Sepal.Width
in the context of 
iris
.
Hopefully, you agree that this is much easier to read and understand. By
printing the values of your new variable 
y
, you can confirm that it’s identical to 
x
in
the previous example.
> head(y)
[1] 1.457143 1.633333 1.468750 1.483871 1.388889 1.384615
You also can use the 
identical()
function to get R to tell you whether these
values are, in fact, the same:
> identical(x, y)
[1] TRUE
In addition to 
with()
, the helpful 
within()
function allows you to assign
values to columns in your data very easily. Say you want to add your
calculated ratio of sepal length to width to the original data frame. You’re
already familiar with writing it like this:
> iris$ratio <- iris$Sepal.Length / iris$Sepal.Width
Now, using 
within()
it turns into the following:
> iris <- within(iris, ratio <- Sepal.Length / Sepal.Width)
This works in a very similar way to 
with()
, except that you can use the assign
operator (
<-
) inside your function. If you now look at the structure of 
iris
, you’ll
notice that 
ratio
is a column:
> head(iris$ratio)
[1] 1.457143 1.633333 1.468750 1.483871 1.388889 1.384615
Next, we take a look at how to cut your data into subgroups.
Creating subgroups or bins of data
One of the first tasks statisticians often use to investigate their data is to draw
histograms. (You get to plot histograms in Chapter 15). A histogram is a plot of the
number of occurrences of data in specific bins or subgroups. Because this type of
calculation is fairly common when you do statistics, R has some functions to do
exactly that.
The 
cut()
function creates bins of equal size (by default) in your data and
then classifies each element into its appropriate bin.
If this sounds like a mouthful, don’t worry. A few examples should make this
come to life.
Using cut to create a fixed number of subgroups
To illustrate the use of 
cut()
, have a look at the built-in dataset 
state.x77
, an
array with several columns and one row for each state in the United States:
> head(state.x77)
Population Income Illiteracy Life Exp Murder HS Grad
Frost   Area
Alabama          3615   3624        2.1    69.05   15.1    41.3    20  50708
Alaska            365   6315        1.5    69.31   11.3    66.7   152
566432
Arizona          2212   4530        1.8    70.55    7.8    58.1    15
113417
Arkansas         2110   3378        1.9    70.66   10.1    39.9    65  51945
California      21198   5114        1.1    71.71   10.3    62.6    20
156361
Colorado         2541   4884        0.7    72.06    6.8    63.9   166
103766
We want to work with the column called 
Frost
. To extract this column, try the
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested