how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Select text in pdf control Library platform web page asp.net wpf web browser R%20dummies30-part992

order. Do this using the 
order()
function:
> order.pop <- order(some.states$Population)
> order.pop
[1]  2  8  4  3  6  7  1 10  9  5
This means to sort the elements in ascending order, you first take the second
element, then the eighth element, then the fourth element, and so on. Try it:
> some.states$Population[order.pop]
[1]   365   579  2110  2212  2541  3100  3615  4931  8277
[10] 21198
Yes, this is rather long winded. But next we look at how you can use 
order()
in a very powerful way to sort a data frame.
Sorting a data frame in ascending order
In the preceding section, you calculated the order in which the elements of
Population
should be in order for it to be sorted in ascending order, and you stored
that result in 
order.pop
. Now, use 
order.pop
to sort the data frame 
some.states
in
ascending order of population:
> some.states[order.pop, ]
Region Population Income
Alaska           West        365   6315
Delaware        South        579   4809
Arkansas        South       2110   3378
....
Georgia         South       4931   4091
Florida         South       8277   4815
California       West      21198   5114
Sorting in decreasing order
Just like 
sort()
, the 
order()
function also takes an argument called
decreasing
. For example, to sort 
some.states
in decreasing order of population:
> order(some.states$Population)
[1]  2  8  4  3  6  7  1 10  9  5
> order(some.states$Population, decreasing=TRUE)
[1]  5  9 10  1  7  6  3  4  8  2
Select text in pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
text searchable pdf; how to select all text in pdf
Select text in pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
find text in pdf files; search a pdf file for text
Just as before, you can sort the data frame 
some.states
in decreasing order of
population. Try it, but this time don’t assign the order to a temporary variable:
> some.states[order(some.states$Population, decreasing=TRUE), ]
Region Population Income
California       West      21198   5114
Florida         South       8277   4815
Georgia         South       4931   4091
....
Arkansas        South       2110   3378
Delaware        South        579   4809
Alaska           West        365   6315
Sorting on more than one column
You probably think that sorting is very straightforward, and you’re correct.
Sorting on more than one column is almost as easy.
You can pass more than one vector as an argument to the 
order()
function.
If you do so, the result will be the equivalent of adding a secondary sorting
key. In other words, the order will be determined by the first vector and any
ties will then sort according to the second vector.
Next, you get to sort 
some.states
on more than one column — in this case,
Region
and 
Population
. If this sounds confusing, don’t worry — it really isn’t. Try it
yourself. First, calculate the order to sort 
some.states
in the order of region as well
at population:
> index <- with(some.states, order(Region, Population))
> some.states[index, ]
Region Population Income
Connecticut Northeast       3100   5348
Delaware        South        579   4809
Arkansas        South       2110   3378
Alabama         South       3615   3624
Georgia         South       4931   4091
Florida         South       8277   4815
Alaska           West        365   6315
Arizona          West       2212   4530
Colorado         West       2541   4884
California       West      21198   5114
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
C#: Select All Images from One PDF Page. C# programming sample for extracting all images from a specific PDF page. C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
pdf find text; find and replace text in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for extracting an image from a specific position on PDF in VB.NET program.
pdf select text; search pdf documents for text
Sorting multiple columns in mixed order
You may start to wonder how to calculate the order when some of the
columns need to be in increasing order and others need to be in decreasing
order.
To do this, you need to make use of a helper function called 
xtfrm()
. This
function transforms a vector into a numeric vector that sorts in the same
order. After you’ve transformed a vector, you can take the negative to
indicate decreasing order.
To sort 
some.states
into decreasing order of region and increasing order of
population, try the following:
> index <- order(-xtfrm(some.states$Region),
+ some.states$Population)
> some.states[index, ]
Region Population Income
Alaska West 365 6315
Arizona West 2212 4530
Colorado West 2541 4884
California West 21198 5114
Delaware South 579 4809
Arkansas South 2110 3378
Alabama South 3615 3624
Georgia South 4931 4091
Florida South 8277 4815
Connecticut Northeast 3100 5348
Traversing Your Data with the Apply Functions
R has a powerful suite of functions that allows you to apply a function
repeatedly over the elements of a list. The interesting and crucial thing about this
is that it happens without an explicit loop. In Chapter 9, you see how to use loops
appropriately and get a brief introduction to the apply family.
Because this is such a useful concept, you’ll come across quite a few different
flavors of functions in the apply family of functions. The specific flavor of 
apply()
depends on the structure of data that you want to traverse:
Array or matrix: Use the 
apply()
function. This traverses either the rows or
columns of a matrix, applies a function to each resulting vector, and returns a
vector of summarized results.
VB.NET PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from
Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. Image: Extract Image from PDF. VB.NET PDF - Redact PDF Text. Help
how to search a pdf document for text; how to search pdf files for text
C# PDF Text Redact Library: select, redact text content from PDF
Page: Rotate a PDF Page. PDF Read. Text: Extract Text from PDF. Text: Search Text in PDF. C#.NET PDF SDK - Redact PDF Text in C#.NET.
search text in multiple pdf; text searchable pdf file
List: Use the 
lapply()
function to traverse a list, apply a function to each
element, and return a list of the results. Sometimes it’s possible to simplify the
resulting list into a matrix or vector. This is what the 
sapply()
function does.
Figure 13-3 demonstrates the appropriate function, depending on whether
your data is in the form of an array or a list.
Figure 13-3: Use 
apply
on arrays and matrices; use 
lapply
or 
sapply
on lists.
The ability to apply a function over the elements of a list is one of the
distinguishing features of the functional programming style as opposed to an
imperative programming style. In the imperative style, you use loops, but in
the functional programming style you apply functions. R has a variety of apply-
type functions, including 
apply()
lapply()
, and 
sapply()
.
Using the apply() function to summarize arrays
If you have data in the form of an array or matrix and you want to summarize
this data, the 
apply()
function is really useful. The 
apply()
function traverses an
array or matrix by column or row and applies a summarizing function.
The 
apply()
function takes four arguments:
X
: This is your data — an array (or matrix).
MARGIN
: A numeric vector indicating the dimension over which to traverse; 
1
means rows and 
2
means columns.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
select text in pdf reader; pdf find highlighted text
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Select tool. Select text and image on PDF document. 2. Hand tool. Pan around the document. Go To Tab. Item. Name. Description
how to select text in pdf; how to select text in a pdf
FUN
: The function to apply (for example, 
sum
or 
mean
).
...
(dots): If your 
FUN
function requires any additional arguments, you can add
them here.
To illustrate this, look at the built-in dataset 
Titanic
. This is a four-
dimensional table with passenger data of the ship Titanic, describing their cabin
class, gender, age, and whether they survived.
> str(Titanic)
table [1:4, 1:2, 1:2, 1:2] 0 0 35 0 0 0 17 0 118 154 ...
- attr(*, “dimnames”)=List of 4
..$ Class   : chr [1:4] “1st” “2nd” “3rd” “Crew”
..$ Sex     : chr [1:2] “Male” “Female”
..$ Age     : chr [1:2] “Child” “Adult”
..$ Survived: chr [1:2] “No” “Yes”
In Chapter 14, you find some more examples of working with tables, including
information about how tables differ from arrays.
To find out how many passengers were in each of their cabin classes, you
need to summarize 
Titanic
over its first dimension, 
Class
:
> apply(Titanic, 1, sum)
1st  2nd  3rd Crew
325  285  706  885
Similarly, to calculate the number of passengers in the different age groups,
you need to apply the 
sum()
function over the third dimension:
> apply(Titanic, 3, sum)
Child Adult
109  2092
You also can apply a function over two dimensions at the same time. To do
this, you need to combine the desired dimensions with the 
c()
function. For
example, to get a summary of how many people in each age group survived, you
do the following:
> apply(Titanic, c(3, 4), sum)
Survived
Age       No Yes
Child   52  57
Adult 1438 654
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
search pdf for text in multiple files; how to select all text in pdf file
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Tools Tab. Item. Name. Description. Ⅰ. Hand. Pan around the PDF document. Ⅱ. Select. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V.
searching pdf files for text; pdf text search
Using lapply() and sapply() to traverse a list or data frame
In Chapter 9 we show you how to use the 
lapply()
and 
sapply()
functions. In
this section, we briefly review these functions.
When your data is in the form of a list, and you want to perform calculations
on each element of that list, the appropriate 
apply
function is 
lapply()
. For
example, to get the class of each element of 
iris
, do the following:
> lapply(iris, class)
As you know, when you use 
sapply()
, R attempts to simplify the results to a
matrix or vector:
> sapply(iris, class)
Sepal.Length  Sepal.Width Petal.Length  Petal.Width      Species
“numeric”    “numeric”    “numeric”    “numeric”     “factor”
Say you want to calculate the mean of each column of 
iris
:
> sapply(iris, mean)
Sepal.Length  Sepal.Width Petal.Length  Petal.Width      Species
5.843333     3.057333     3.758000     1.199333           NA
Warning message:
In mean.default(X[[5L]], ...) :
argument is not numeric or logical: returning NA
There is a problem with this line of code. It throws a warning message
because 
species
is not a numeric column. So, you may want to write a small
function inside 
apply()
that tests whether the argument is numeric. If it is, then
calculate the mean score; otherwise, simply return 
NA
.
In Chapter 8, you create your own functions. The 
FUN
argument of the
apply()
functions can be any function, including your own custom functions. In
fact, you can go one step further. It’s actually possible to define a function
inside the 
FUN
argument call to any 
apply()
function:
> sapply(iris, function(x) ifelse(is.numeric(x), mean(x), NA))
Sepal.Length  Sepal.Width Petal.Length  Petal.Width      Species
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Click to select drawing annotation with default properties. Other Tab. Item. Name. Description. 17. Text box. Click to add a text box to specific location on PDF
search text in pdf image; make pdf text searchable
C# Image: Select Document or Image Source to View in Web Viewer
Supported document formats: TIFF, PDF, Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Dicom; Supported Viewer Library enables Visual C# programmers easily to select and load
convert pdf to searchable text; how to select text in pdf reader
5.843333     3.057333     3.758000     1.199333           NA
What’s happening here? You defined a function that takes a single argument 
x
.
If 
x
is numeric, it returns 
mean(x)
; otherwise, it returns 
NA
. Because 
sapply()
traverses your list, each column, in turn, is passed to your function and evaluated.
When you define a nameless function like this inside another function, it’s
called an anonymous function. Anonymous functions are useful when you want
to calculate something fairly simple, but you don’t necessarily want to
permanently store that function in your workspace.
Using tapply() to create tabular summaries
So far, you’ve used three members of the apply family of functions: 
apply()
,
lapply()
, and 
sapply()
. It’s time to meet the fourth member of the family. You use
tapply()
to create tabular summaries of data. This function takes three
arguments:
X
: A vector
INDEX
: A factor or list of factors
FUN
: A function
With 
tapply()
, you can easily create summaries of subgroups in data. For
example, calculate the mean sepal length in the dataset 
iris
:
> tapply(iris$Sepal.Length, iris$Species, mean)
setosa versicolor  virginica
5.006      5.936      6.588
With this short line of code, you do some powerful stuff. You tell R to take the
Sepal.Length
column, split it according to 
Species
, and then calculate the mean for
each group.
This is an important idiom for writing code in R, and it usually goes by the
name Split, Apply, and Combine (SAC). In this case, you split a vector into
groups, apply a function to each group, and then combine the result into a
vector.
Of course, using the 
with()
function, you can write your line of code in a
slightly more readable way:
> with(iris, tapply(Sepal.Length, Species, mean))
setosa versicolor  virginica
5.006      5.936      6.588
Using 
tapply()
, you also can create more complex tables to summarize your
data. You do this by using a list as your 
INDEX
argument.
Using tapply() to create higher-dimensional tables
For example, try to summarize the data frame 
mtcars
, a built-in data frame
with data about motor-car engines and performance. As with any object, you can
use 
str()
to inspect its structure:
> str(mtcars)
The variable 
am
is a numeric vector that indicates whether the engine has an
automatic (
0
) or manual (
1
) gearbox. Because this isn’t very descriptive, start by
creating a new object, 
cars
, that is a copy of 
mtcars
, and change the column 
am
to
be a factor:
> cars <- within(mtcars,
+     am <- factor(am, levels=0:1, labels=c(“Automatic”, “Manual”))
+ )
Now use 
tapply()
to find the mean miles per gallon (
mpg
) for each type of
gearbox:
> with(cars, tapply(mpg, am, mean))
Automatic    Manual
17.14737  24.39231
Yes, you’re correct. This is still only a one-dimensional table. Now, try to make
a two-dimensional table with the type of gearbox (
am)
and number of gears (
gear
):
> with(cars, tapply(mpg, list(gear, am), mean))
Automatic Manual
3  16.10667     NA
4  21.05000 26.275
5        NA 21.380
You use 
tapply()
to create tabular summaries of data. This is a little bit
similar to the 
table()
function. However, 
table()
can create only contingency
tables (that is, tables of counts), whereas with 
tapply()
you can specify any
function as the aggregation function. In other words, with 
tapply()
, you can
calculate counts, means, or any other value.
If you want to summarize statistics on a single vector, 
tapply()
is very useful
and quick to use.
Using aggregate()
Another R function that does something very similar is 
aggregate()
:
> with(cars, aggregate(mpg, list(gear=gear, am=am), mean))
gear        am        x
1    3 Automatic 16.10667
2    4 Automatic 21.05000
3    4    Manual 26.27500
4    5    Manual 21.38000
Next, you take 
aggregate()
to new heights using the formula interface.
Getting to Know the Formula Interface
Now it’s time to get familiar with another very important idea in R: the formula
interface. The formula interface allows you to concisely specify which columns to
use when fitting a model, as well as the behavior of the model.
It’s important to keep in mind that the formula notation refers to statistical
formulae, as opposed to mathematical formulae. So, for example, the formula
operator 
+
means to include a column, not to mathematically add two columns
together. Table 13-3 contains some formula operators, as well as examples and
their meanings. You need these operators when you start building models.
We won’t go deeper into this subject in this book, but now you know what
to look for in the Help pages of different modeling functions. Be aware of the
fact that the interpretation of the signs can differ depending on the modeling
function you use.
Table 13-3 Some Formula Operators and Their
Meanings
Operator
Example
Meaning
~
y ~ x
Model 
y
as a function of 
x
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested