how to view pdf file in asp.net c# : Cannot select text in pdf SDK control service wpf azure winforms dnn R%20dummies32-part994

that benefits from being converted to a factor and data that needs to stay
numeric. If you can view your data as categorical, converting it to a factor
helps with analyzing it.
Counting unique values
Let’s take another look at the dataset 
mtcars
. This built-in dataset describes
fuel consumption and ten different design points from 32 cars from the 1970s. It
contains, in total, 11 variables, but all of them are numeric. Although you can work
with the data frame as is, some variables could be converted to a factor because
they have a limited amount of values.
If you don’t know how many different values a variable has, you can get this
information in two simple steps:
1. Get the unique values of the variable using 
unique()
.
2. Get the length of the resulting vector using 
length()
.
Using the 
sapply()
function from Chapter 9, you can do this for the whole data
frame at once. You apply an anonymous function combining both mentioned steps
on the whole data frame, like this:
> sapply(mtcars, function(x) length(unique(x)))
mpg  cyl disp   hp drat   wt qsec   vs   am gear carb
25    3   27   22   22   29   30    2    2    3    6
So, it looks like the variables 
cyl
vs
am
gear
, and 
carb
can benefit from a
conversion to factor. Remember: You have 32 different observations in that
dataset, so none of the variables has unique values only.
When to treat a variable like a factor depends a bit on the situation, but, as
a general rule, avoid more than ten different levels in a factor and try to have
at least five values per level.
Preparing the data
In many real-life cases, you get heaps of data in a big file, and preferably in a
format you can’t use at all. That must be the golden rule of data gathering: Make
Cannot select text in pdf - search text inside PDF file in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn how to search text in PDF document and obtain text content and location information
how to make a pdf file text searchable; cannot select text in pdf
Cannot select text in pdf - VB.NET PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Learn How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information in VB.NET application
cannot select text in pdf file; pdf searchable text
sure your statistician sweats his pants off just by looking at the data. But no
worries! With R at your fingertips, you can quickly shape your data exactly as you
want it. Selecting only the variables you need and transforming them to the right
format becomes pretty easy with the tricks you see in the previous chapters.
Let’s prepare the data frame 
mtcars
a bit using some simple tricks. First,
create a data frame 
cars
like this:
> cars <- mtcars[c(1,2,9,10)]
> cars$gear <- ordered(cars$gear)
> cars$am <- factor(cars$am, labels=c(‘auto’, ‘manual’))
With this code, you do the following:
Select four variables from the data frame 
mtcars
and save them in a
data frame called 
cars
. Note that you use the index system for lists to select
the variables (see Chapter 7).
Make the variable 
gear
in this data frame an ordered factor.
Give the variable 
am
the value 
‘auto’
if its original value is 
1
, and
‘manual’
if its original value is 
0
.
Transform the new variable 
am
to a factor.
In the conversion of 
cars$am
, you notice that the first argument of the
ifelse()
statement isn’t a logical expression. The original variable has 
0
and 
1
as values, and R reads a 
0
as 
FALSE
and everything else as 
TRUE
. You can use
this property in your own code, as shown earlier.
After running this code, you should have a dataset 
cars
in your workspace
with the following structure:
> str(cars)
‘data.frame’:  32 obs. of  4 variables:
$ mpg : num  21 21 22.8 21.4 18.7 ...
$ cyl : num  6 6 4 6 8 ...
$ am  : Factor w/ 2 levels “auto”,”manual”: 1 1 1 2 2 ...
$ gear: Ord.factor w/ 3 levels “3”<”4”<”5”: 2 2 2 1 1 ...
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on AzureCloudService
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. Or you can select x86 if you use x86 dlls. (The application cannot to work without this node.).
pdf text search tool; pdf editor with search and replace text
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. When you select x64 and directly run the application, you may get following error. (The application cannot to work without
can't select text in pdf file; search text in pdf using java
With this dataset in your workspace you’re ready to tackle the rest of this
chapter.
In order to avoid too much clutter on the screen, we set the argument
vec.len
to 
2
in the 
str()
function when creating the output. This argument
defines the default number of values that are displayed for each variable. If
you use 
str(cars)
, your output may look a bit different from the one shown
here. See the Help page 
?str
for more information. Or just forget about it —
you’ll never use it unless you start writing a book about R.
Describing Continuous Variables
You have the dataset and you’ve formatted it to fit your needs, so now you’re
ready for the real work. Analyzing your data always starts with describing it. This
way you can detect errors in the data, and you can decide which models are
appropriate to get the information you need from the data you have. Which
descriptive statistics you use depends on the nature of your data, of course. Let’s
first take a look at some things you want to do with continuous data.
Talking about the center of your data
Sometimes you’re more interested in the general picture of your data than you
are in the individual values. You may be interested not in the mileage of every car,
but in the average mileage of all cars from that dataset. For this, you calculate the
mean using the 
mean()
function, like this:
> mean(cars$mpg)
[1] 20.09062
You also could calculate the average number of cylinders those cars have, but
this doesn’t really make sense. The average would be 6.1875 cylinders, and we
have yet to see a car driving with an incomplete cylinder. In this case, the median
— the most central value in your data — makes more sense. You get the median
from using the function 
median()
, like this:
> median(cars$cyl)
[1] 6
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
Choose Items", and browse to locate and select "RasterEdge.Imaging open a file dialog and load your PDF document in will be a pop-up window "cannot open your
how to select all text in pdf; cannot select text in pdf
C# Image: How to Deploy .NET Imaging SDK in Visual C# Applications
RasterEdge.Imaging.MSWordDocx.dll; RasterEdge.Imaging.PDF.dll; in C# Application. Q: Error: Cannot find RasterEdge Right click on projects, and select properties.
how to make a pdf file text searchable; select text pdf file
There are numerous other reasons for calculating the median instead of the
mean, or even both together. Both statistics describe a different property of
your data, and even the combination can tell you something. If you don’t know
how to interpret these statistics, Statistics For Dummies, 2nd Edition, by
Deborah J. Rumsey, PhD (Wiley) is a great resource.
Describing the variation
A single number doesn’t tell you that much about your data. Often it’s at least
as important to have an idea about the spread of your data. You can look at this
spread using a number of different approaches.
First, you can calculate either the variance or the standard deviation to
summarize the spread in a single number. For that, you have the convenient
functions 
var()
for the variance and 
sd()
for the standard deviation. For example,
you calculate the standard deviation of the variable 
mpg
in the data frame 
cars
like
this:
> sd(cars$mpg)
[1] 6.026948
Checking the quantiles
Next to the mean and variation, you also can take a look at the quantiles. A
quantile, or percentile, tells you how much of your data lies below a certain value.
The 50 percent quantile, for example, is nothing but the median. Again, R has
some convenient functions to help you with looking at the quantiles.
Calculating the range
The most-used quantiles are actually the 0 percent and 100 percent quantiles.
You could just as easily call them the minimum and maximum, because that’s what
they are. We introduce the 
min()
and 
max()
functions in Chapter 4. You can get
both together using the 
range()
function. This function conveniently gives you the
range of the data. So, to know between which two values all the mileages are
situated, you simply do the following:
GIF to PNG Converter | Convert GIF to PNG, Convert PNG to GIF
Imaging SDK; Save the converted list in memory if you cannot convert at Select "Convert to PNG"; Select "Start" to start conversion procedure; Select "Save" to
how to search text in pdf document; how to make pdf text searchable
C# PowerPoint: Document Viewer Creating in Windows Forms Project
You can select a PowerPoint file to be loaded into the WinViewer control. is not supported by WinViewer control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your
convert pdf to word searchable text; search text in pdf image
> range(cars$mpg)
[1] 10.4 33.9
Calculating the quartiles
The range still gives you only limited information. Often statisticians report the
first and the third quartile next to the range and the median. These quartiles are,
respectively, the 25 percent and 75 percent quantiles, which are the numbers for
which one-fourth and three-fourths of the data is smaller. You get these numbers
using the 
quantile()
function, like this:
> quantile(cars$mpg)
0%    25%    50%    75%   100%
10.400 15.425 19.200 22.800 33.900
The quartiles are not the same as the lower and upper hinge calculated in
the five-number summary. The latter two are, respectively, the median of the
lower and upper half of your data, and they differ slightly from the first and
third quartiles. To get the five number statistics, you use the 
fivenum()
function.
Getting on speed with the quantile function
The 
quantile()
function can give you any quantile you want. For that, you use
the 
probs
argument. You give the 
probs
(or probabilities) as a fractional number.
For the 20 percent quantile, for example, you use 
0.20
as an argument for the
value. This argument also takes a vector as a value, so you can, for example, get
the 5 percent and 95 percent quantiles like this:
> quantile(cars$mpg, probs=c(0.05, 0.95))
5%    95%
11.995 31.300
The default value for the 
probs
argument is a vector representing the
minimum (0), the first quartile (0.25), the median (0.5), the third quartile (0.75),
and the maximum (1).
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
DeleteAnnotation: Delete all selected text or graphical annotations. You can select a file to be loaded into the there will prompt a window "cannot open your
find and replace text in pdf file; how to select text in pdf and copy
C# Image: How to Use C# Code to Capture Document from Scanning
installed on the client as browsers cannot interface directly a multi-page document (including PDF, TIFF, Word Select Fill from the Dock property located in
search pdf for text; pdf find text
All functions from the previous sections have an argument 
na.rm
that allows
you to remove all 
NA
values before calculating the respective statistic. If you
don’t do this, any vector containing 
NA
will have 
NA
as a result. This works
identically to the 
na.rm
argument of the 
sum()
function (see Chapter 4).
Describing Categories
A first step in every analysis consists of calculating the descriptive statistics for
your dataset. You have to get to know the data you received before you can
accurately decide what models you try out on them. You need to know something
about the range of the values in your data, how these values are distributed in the
range, and how values in different variables relate to each other. Much of what you
do and how you do it depends on the type of data.
Counting appearances
Whenever you have a limited number of different values, you can get a quick
summary of the data by calculating a frequency table. A frequency table is a table
that represents the number of occurrences of every unique value in the variable. In
R, you use the 
table()
function for that.
Creating a table
You can tabulate, for example, the amount of cars with a manual and an
automatic gearbox using the following command:
> amtable <- table(cars$am)
> amtable
auto manual
13     19
This outcome tells you that, in your data, there are 13 cars with an automatic
gearbox and 19 with a manual gearbox.
Working with tables
C# Word: How to Create C# Word Windows Viewer with .NET DLLs
and browse to find and select RasterEdge.XDoc control, there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to select text in pdf; pdf text search
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Items", and browse to find & select WinViewer DLL; there will prompt a window "cannot open your powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
text searchable pdf file; find and replace text in pdf
As with most functions, you can save the output of 
table()
in a new object (in
this case, called 
amtable
). At first sight, the output of 
table()
looks like a named
vector, but is it?
> class(amtable)
[1] “table”
The 
table()
function generates an object of the class 
table
. These objects
have the same structure as an array. Arrays can have an arbitrary number of
dimensions and dimension names (see Chapter 7). Tables can be treated as
arrays to select values or dimension names.
In the “Describing Multiple Variables” section, later in this chapter, you use
multidimensional tables and calculate margins and proportions based on those
tables.
Calculating proportions
After you have the table with the counts, you can easily calculate the
proportion of each count to the total simply by dividing the table by the total
counts. To calculate the proportion of manual and automatic gearboxes in the
dataset 
cars
, you can use the following code:
> amtable/sum(amtable)
auto  manual
0.40625 0.59375
Yet, R also provides the 
prop.table()
function to do the same. You can get
the exact same result as the previous line of code by doing the following:
> prop.table(amtable)
You may wonder why you would use an extra function for something that’s as
easy as dividing by the sum. The 
prop.table()
function also can calculate marginal
proportions (see the “Describing Multiple Variables” section, later in this chapter).
Finding the center
In statistics, the mode of a categorical variable is the value that occurs most
frequently. It isn’t exactly the center of your data, but if there’s no order in your
data — if you look at a nominal variable — you can’t really talk about a center
either.
Although there isn’t a specific function to calculate the mode, you can get it by
combining a few tricks:
1. To get the counts for each value, use 
table()
.
2. To find the location of the maximum number of counts, use 
max()
.
3. To find the mode of your variable, select the name corresponding
with the location in Step 2 from the table in Step 1.
So, to find the mode for the variable 
am
in the dataset 
cars
, you can use the
following code:
> id <- amtable == max(amtable)
> names(amtable)[id]
[1] “manual”
The variable 
id
contains a logical vector that has the value 
TRUE
for every
value in the table 
amtable
that is equal to the maximum in that table. You select
the name from the values in 
amtable
using this logical vector as an index.
You also can use the 
which.max()
function to find the location of the
maximum in a vector. This function has one important disadvantage, though:
If you have multiple maximums, 
which.max()
will return the position of the
first maximum only. If you’re interested in all maximums, you should use the
construct in the previous example.
Describing Distributions
Sometimes the information about the center of the data just isn’t enough. You
get some information about your data from the variance or the quantiles, but still
you may miss important features of your data. Instead of calculating yet more
numbers, R offers you some graphical tools to inspect your data further. And in the
meantime, you can impress people with some fancy plots.
Plotting histograms
To get a clearer idea about how your data is distributed within the range, you
can plot a histogram. In Chapter 16, you fancy up your plots, but for now let’s just
check the most-used tool for describing your data graphically.
Making the plot
To make a histogram for the mileage data, you simply use the 
hist()
function, like this:
> hist(cars$mpg, col=’grey’)
The result of this function is shown on the left of Figure 14-1. There you see
that the 
hist()
function first cuts the range of the data in a number of even
intervals, and then counts the number of observations in each interval. The bars
height is proportional to those frequencies. On the y-axis, you find the counts.
With the argument 
col
, you give the bars in the histogram a bit of color. In
Chapter 16, we give you some more tricks for customizing the histogram (for
example, by adding a title).
Playing with breaks
R chooses the number of intervals it considers most useful to represent the
data, but you can disagree with what R does and choose the breaks yourself. For
this, you use the 
breaks
argument of the 
hist()
function.
Figure 14-1: Creating a histogram for your data.
You can specify the breaks in a couple different ways:
You can tell R the number of bars you want in the histogram by giving
a single number as the argument. Just keep in mind that R will still decide
whether that’s actually reasonable, and it tries to cut up the range using nice
rounded numbers.
You can tell R exactly where to put the breaks by giving a vector with
the break points as a value to the 
breaks
argument.
So, if you don’t agree with R and you want to have bars representing the
intervals 5 to 15, 15 to 25, and 25 to 35, you can do this with the following code:
> hist(cars$mpg, breaks=c(5,15,25,35))
The resulting plot is on the right side of Figure 14-1.
You also can give the name of the algorithm R has to use to determine the
number of breaks as the value for the 
breaks
argument. You can find more
information on those algorithms on the Help page 
?hist
. Try to experiment
with those algorithms a bit to check which one works the best.
Using frequencies or densities
By breaking up your data in intervals, you still lose some information, albeit a
lot less than when just looking at the descriptives you calculate in the previous
sections. Still, the most complete way of describing your data is by estimating the
probability density function (PDF) or density of your variable.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested